Talking to Cool People w/ Jason Frazell

Ed Arincue - Coach, Chief Revenue Officer, Sales Expert

October 19, 2022 Season 3 Episode 40
Talking to Cool People w/ Jason Frazell
Ed Arincue - Coach, Chief Revenue Officer, Sales Expert
Show Notes Transcript

Jason and Ed talk about when the right time is to fire a customer, Jason shares his perspective on what you should be thinking about before leaving your corporate gig to start your own thing, and they talk about the future of sports performance through the lens of technology.

"Live, love, learn."

Ed is an employee-focused leader passionate about leading teams through profitable and transformational growth. Strategy, sales, and leadership are his core skills supported by an overarching mindset that people development leads to excellence.

Driving to excellence means delivering on near-term and long-term growth objectives while unleashing the potential of every team member. This type of growth fuels him as a leader, and he has learned that it leads to measurable results for all performance objectives.

His career has spanned numerous industries, from legal to healthcare, entertainment to sports. He believes in the power of human connection while leveraging the strength that modern technology brings to our ability to connect.

In addition to his passion for building successful teams and companies,he is a golf and basketball enthusiast that loves the thrill of motorcycle racing and all things related to food.

https://www.linkedin.com/in/edarcinue/

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Find the show at all of the cool spots below and find us at jasonfrazell.com/podcasts.

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Jason Frazell:

My guest on the show today is at our sin way, he is a seasoned sales leader. With a, like a long resume, I'm not even gonna go there ad because you know, people don't probably care that much about your resume, you can check them out on LinkedIn. He's has experienced running teams across a variety of industries. And he's also much more than that he is a coach. He's a speaker, he's an investor. He's a franchise owner. And when we connected right away, he's an avid video game player. So I said this dude, you can make as much money as you want. You can sell millions and millions of dollars of product. But you're a video gamer. And that's where I'm like, Yep, we're going to talk about that. So we're going to spend the entire time talking about video games.

Ed Arincue:

Okay, that'd be cool. We could

Jason Frazell:

add, we just, I think I could hear like 99% of the audience just drop already. And we're doing this live. I'm just envisioning that in my mind.

Ed Arincue:

I just put on on Twitch.

Jason Frazell:

Put it on. Yeah, we're broadcasting this on Twitch right now. But Edie, thanks for being here today.

Ed Arincue:

Hey, it's great to be here, Jason.

Jason Frazell:

Awesome. Let's get into it. And let's start by talking about something that you nerd out about. What is something we

Ed Arincue:

just talked about? We just talked about video games. And I'll tell you just don't worry about that. Please. My parents were not interested in me playing games, video games. Like I was a huge nerd. Like gigantic with a capital and I was the president of the Advanced Dungeons and Dragons club in seventh grade. I was like, I consider myself a really good dungeon master at that point in time, but that was before video games. At four, that's how I'm dating myself.

Jason Frazell:

You know what's so perfect about I just have to say this, and I'm sure you've heard this. This is now cool because of Stranger Things.

Ed Arincue:

It is it wasn't cool to tell the Hellfire Club. It was yeah, it was the Hellfire Club.

Jason Frazell:

You were the Hellfire Club.

Ed Arincue:

President of the Hellfire Club. Now it's cool. It was not cool. For i It's questionable if it's still cool. Yeah, that's where I live, you know, surprised at how big the Dungeons and Dragons community is they're interested in you know, I would say it started with that. But then computers, you know, I got an F in citizenship in middle school because I was seeking out of art class to play video games on a trs 80 Which is, you know, there's no graphics, it's just tennis like it's text based game. And so I was so in love with that. That, you know, it continued for a while in college, I was building PCs because I couldn't get any money to do to buy a decent PC. I would I would sneak into a another friend's room because he was like a rich prince from Bahrain and he had like the super cool computer. Yeah. But eventually I was just building them on my own just trying to get games to work. And that led into a career where I was playing basketball with a guy kept on bugging him for discounts and he said just come work for me. You know, you can you can sell computers you can build your own and so I did that. And I was just chasing games you know, worked at Egghead software worked at a reseller was eventually recruited by Hewlett Packard got interviewed by Microsoft they asked me you know what to do for fun? I said I played video games and they got super interested I think that's why I got the job.

Jason Frazell:

They're like well, you have an ideally you games to

Ed Arincue:

really good at Counter Strike. I don't know if you remember that game. Of course. Still, I was like, I was like on the number one team on the OG I miss my column, because before the end, we got

Jason Frazell:

paid to be good at that. You were an Esports person before eSports

Ed Arincue:

before eSports was cool. Like I was Yeah, multiplayer gaming before it was a thing. So I really nerd it out. I still stuff. Yeah, like it's, it's a thing, but it's driven a lot of my passions, my career, my thought process.

Jason Frazell:

Yeah, that's good. And now you play video games. And it's called sales. You're like, if I if I open up this door? In other words, hire these people. Like, what? The branching is an art. It's like a living role playing game. You're like, well, what if we could bring in these people with these strengths? We build this team with this strength, and then we level them up. What what's the output of this thing?

Ed Arincue:

That's right. Gotta get experience points level up so you can be better at your hit roles.

Jason Frazell:

Exactly. You're here. That's awesome, man. That's awesome. Yeah, we have we have a similar background I built compute. I was never a d&d. I've actually never played d&d. I played plenty of video games that are based on d&d. Yeah. The rolling Yeah, but I've never done that. But I did build my own computers. When I was little. I really had a passion for that as fun and then I, I worked at a store called Computer city, which was purchased by CompUSA. I sold computers. And I was I was always on the sales floor. But I really had a passion for like building my own PCs and stuff. I haven't done it a long time and I kind of want to do it again. I don't underwhelming to put it I know

Ed Arincue:

it's a pain in the ass. Yeah, now I just buy him fully configured. Because

Jason Frazell:

yeah. Now I just now I just use my MacBook Pro. And then I just use GeForce Now three with a, like the like the cloud services like Nvidia as a cloud service. And you can run any game that they support on top specs. And it's spectacular, as long as you have a good internet connection. So like, really, like the whole thing has just completely changed now, getting away from the hardware, and it's all with the software and streaming. And again, I'm hearing the one person who's left listening, they've now dropped off. So now we're just gonna have whatever conversation we want. All right, so let's talk about

Ed Arincue:

some of the other cool stuff. You know, like, yeah, exactly, I got to talk with this guy as my other nerd out. Yeah. motorcycle racing all that

Jason Frazell:

you're, well, you're a well rounded individual. So what's something that's inside of your comfort zone that you know is going to be outside of somebody else's?

Ed Arincue:

I think it's getting to that outside of the comfort zone. So I don't mind pushing the limits, we're going to do something different, changing careers changing companies, taking a company and transforming it in in ways that people aren't used to. So I'm comfortable. constantly moving up the concert, and I wouldn't sound comfortable, like I just do it. You just do it necessary. It feels uncomfortable. But I know that that is the only way to learn. And the only way to get better is to push push out of the comfort zone. That being said, like I can't stand staying in the comfort zone. So so I get bored really easily. So the opposite is true is like if things get static, or things are the same or or were very routine, you know, I can't do it. You know, I can't like exercise. I hate exercise. You know, most people love they like Oh, I love to run I love to workout I hate I hate doing that. I have to force myself to do that. So I I have a hard time understanding. When people love to do something, you know, routine and? And hard. Like, yeah, it's kind of forced myself to do those those things. Yeah. Or commit myself tricking myself into it.

Jason Frazell:

trick yourself. You've gamified it? Yeah. Well, that one thing that really struck me is a new, you know, the answer the second part of this question, which is what's something that's outside your comfort zone? What is just uncomfortable for you is what I hear is being bored, or I don't even use the word bored, but it's like staying with it. Have you ever unsimilar? And have you ever found or that's actually been a negative in your life?

Ed Arincue:

Yeah, it's, it seems like I'm really impatient. Maybe I am impatient. And, and, you know, I'm not just pushing myself and pushing entire organizations in this direction. And, and, and I got to, you know, the heart, part of the thing is, he's got to realize that you get to meet people where they're at. And yeah, some people don't want to change or they don't want to move out of their comfort zone, or it's something different. And when it's different, it's something that people are afraid of happen. Yeah.

Jason Frazell:

Yeah, I think we've, we've caught up about this, I come from a sales background and worked at a couple massive companies, some smaller companies. You know, this as well as anybody, I think the average the average tenure of like a CRO to start up as like a year and a half. It's, it's not high. Yeah, it's 18 months, right. So it's interesting, because I think most CROs that I know, and I worked with or worked for, usually have a similar kind of like, spin is like, we need to do things differently. And that's cool. Except the other executive positions usually don't have that level of uncomfortability sometimes or the board or the investors. So like, I think one of the reasons for that is one it sales, there's always more money to be made elsewhere. There's new products, and it's a very transferable skill to that. Cool Ed, you do whatever you want, make people uncomfortable. You don't have that long to do that, though. For like this, you'd better start working in a better start working in a pretty specific amount of time. Or we're gonna find somebody else who will.

Ed Arincue:

Yeah, I mean, think about it this way. It's like being a wartime leader. Right, exactly. Things need to change. So let's bring in this guy and get to the change. Now we want things to be the same. He's not the right guy anymore. That's right. Or that's not the right place anymore.

Jason Frazell:

Not the right place. Yeah. I'm sure if we dug into your career, which we won't hear that you've had some experiences like that. both good and bad. Not even good and bad. It's like it's just, it's almost what it is. It is what it is part of it right? Is like it's like you're like hey, I'm gonna go be a CRO or, or a chief customer officer like yeah, you got to you got a long lease for a little bit and then it's a very short lease pretty quickly, it's shortly as well. So it's a short leash.

Ed Arincue:

Yeah. Which I assume by quarter, and you're directly connected to business results. Yeah, it's just just what it is

Jason Frazell:

hero to zero on a recurring 90 day basis, or, or for some companies on a recurring 31 or 30 day basis where you're like, wow, I worked, I worked for a really great sales leader. And you'd always say he goes, this is why y'all get paid more than the engineers, because this is an easy, if it was easy, you wouldn't, we wouldn't need to pay you much. And this is also why it's stressful, because we wouldn't need to pay that much if it wasn't stressful. And that's why salespeople get paid well, is it stressful? It's and it's certain, and a lot of people just don't either don't can't they can't do it, they can't handle it, or they don't want to. And that's okay,

Ed Arincue:

anyone could do it. It's just anybody got to be willing to be uncomfortable willing to get rejected, willing to to, you know, try to talk through these things. Like, I think we were we were on that. That seminar with with a Santa recently. Yeah, what is sales? And, you know, there's a lot of soft definitions about it. But the reality is, is you have to ultimately get someone to part with money for something that they weren't intending to do.

Jason Frazell:

They weren't intended to do not exactly like

Ed Arincue:

if they were intended to do it, you don't need sales. Yeah, the order takers,

Jason Frazell:

right? Well, in order takers can be a website, you don't even need a person you don't even need to be. What's interesting about the psychology of sales to is it's the actual transfer of money isn't the thing. It's the emotion in the psychology behind what that means.

Ed Arincue:

Some exchange, like you can take money, it's probably the definite definition of it, but it's some sort of either transaction commitment or action. That yeah, that you've got someone to do. Because you know, you have your pre closes and if and that's selling to until you get to the to the close, and then there's the sell and expand. So yeah, every step of the way. And if you're great at it, it's it's it's not just for you, it's for it's for your customer for lifetime value. And they see That's right. Keep wanting to come back. So, yes. All right. And yes, together. Yeah.

Jason Frazell:

Well, it's a I think most of your career has been spent in business to business selling, right. Like you've been running teams that are b2b, for the most part

Ed Arincue:

to see b2b. I was in b2b sales initially selling be Well, I'd say, you know, as negatives, b2c was b2b, Microsoft, b2b. And then legal Sam, it was B to C to B. So we would sell businesses to become businesses and then sell them as after they became businesses. Yeah. And then at eHealth, it was b2c and on health care. Yeah, it's been

Jason Frazell:

the thing I'd say a b2b sales. Yeah, the thing about the b2b stuff is when somebody parts when that procurement department writes that check somebody's butts on the line almost all the time. So it's like the psychology of like this, the money is the money. And then there's also the reputation that's attached to that money, who's the decision maker who made this decision? And boy, I hope the software or service or consulting engagement or training, or coach, or whatever, the thing you're selling is like, there's always that moving, that the psychology that behind, it is never just about the money.

Ed Arincue:

No, it's never about the money. And then the way that people protect themselves as you move larger organizations is they're more group decisions. So you have Committee decisions, and I told you what you say, No,

Jason Frazell:

yeah, I need Yeah, exactly. I need consensus. All right. We're gonna move on from sales and video games, because I think these are two things you and I could definitely, we could probably start our own podcast and do like a weekly show about these two things and talk forever, very specifically, very specifically. So give you five minutes said, you get to speak to everybody in the world. What is it? Well, you'd want to speak on or what would you speak to us about and what would be your call to action at the end of that speech?

Ed Arincue:

It's along the same lines, you can push your limits, you are infinitely capable and immersed, most of the time. Anyone can do it, but don't you have to get yourself to do it. So find a way find a way to get yourself to get started and have fun doing it and keep doing it. Like, yeah, it's grindy. But things that are grindy you can make fun or you can create habitual triggers that get you to go start or find the environment or find the people to do it with go because anyone can do anything. Yeah, do everything. But if you set your mind to something, you'd be surprised that you're always breaking your own personal boundaries or records or accomplishments and, and mostly what's in people's way is themselves. Yeah, for sure. Their, their their own self limiting belief around those things. And that can be, as I said, manipulated that can be changed that can be, you can trick yourself. Even if you're not even psychologically capable of accepting the change. I think what people don't realize is you're changing every day. Yeah, exactly. Like people, they got people to change. It's like now you're you're changing right now, like right now at a molecular level. Right thing right now. And it's the only thing that is constant. Do you want to direct it in a particular direction? Or do you want to live the consequences in one of your, your podcasts before? It's like, most of the diseases and cancers are preventable? Like, do you just want to walk unconsciously to a bitter end? Yeah. Do you have something in mind? Yeah, that you want to go to? So there's my message to the world.

Jason Frazell:

I love that. Yeah, let's take a really brief commercial break. And we'll be right back and get to know you more. And we're right back after this. All right, and we are back. And at this point, I always love to ask my guests what else you'd like for all of us? What would you like us to know about you? So what what else would you like to share with us? We know you're the head of the Hellfire Club, which seems like the most important thing, you've been a leader, let's reframe that you've been a leader your entire life. You've always been a leader, whether it be the Dungeons and Dragons group, or now in your career. Yeah, what else do you want us to know about you?

Ed Arincue:

Sometimes I don't want anyone to know anything about me sound weird? And hey, how

Jason Frazell:

about that? No, no, it's great. Let me reframe the question, let, let's poke it out here. Hey, Ed, what are you willing to share with us?

Ed Arincue:

That's, that's a better question.

Jason Frazell:

Right? You're like, well, the weather in Texas is it's a nice fall day, the Cowboys play somebody this weekend, and, you know, all the deep stuff.

Ed Arincue:

You know, I guess I'm thinking about some some of some of what I've accomplished and not accomplished, right? Like, I still feel like there's a lot to do. And while while I've accomplished, you know, a lot in, in the career that I've had, I feel like I'm just getting started all over again. And sometimes I feel like that every day. But I'll tell you, you know, what I've learned so far is you can't really do it by yourself. So if there's if there's something that I want to share is like, it's it's much better when you work with people you love to work with. And it's much more fun when you're dealing with customers you want to you want to deal with? And and I just like to have fun with the folks that I'm working with and spending the most amount of time my time with?

Jason Frazell:

Yeah, I mean, yeah, I am. Man, I'm in such agreement on that. This is something that I've really experienced, through my journey is working for myself. It's like being in sales when, and I think it's just like it is for most companies, they're like, We need somebody to pay us a buck. We need somebody to pay us a buck. And then you get an idea about who your ideal client is whether you'd be solopreneur, or you're selling things, and yeah, you're still going to take their buck, but you're going to understand how to manage them better. And for me, personally, if somebody works for myself, I've, I kind of know who I don't want to work with. And if I run across those people, you don't attract very many of them, which is really good. But if you do, and I start to feel it, I'll be like, I'm not sure I'm the right person for you, but I got for the people I think would be great. And I wanted to ask you something, as a sales leader. How do you feel about firing a customer?

Ed Arincue:

Do it just for the same reasons? Right. But especially around respect and safety? Yeah. Like, those are things that that you should fire your customer about. Right? And yeah, like, those are definitely areas where I don't I don't fault anyone for not wanting to work with a client. Right? Like, those are those are crucial, you know, for any environment. So, but just be careful, you know what I mean? Like, are you fired client because of of prejudice or or were because you're having a bad day? Right? Like, like, don't don't reflect back to anyone what you don't? What you don't expect to see. So? Yeah, and then I'd hire hold hold people to a higher standard on that. For the work in our organization.

Jason Frazell:

Yeah. So let me ask you a follow up question to that. You're, you're working for CEO. Your work ended at work for the board, right? We're like we need money. We need this? And you said, we got to fire this customer? And they're like that's, you know, six figure contract. How do you will you only generally work for leaders that are aligned with you on that? Because I would imagine that can be a real sense of tension.

Ed Arincue:

Yeah, I mean, lucky, you do work for the board, you do work for the executives, they have higher fire and bonus capabilities. And the the reality is you work for the marketplace. Like, it doesn't matter what the board or the executive says, tells you what to do. If the customers, the employees are not lined up to go do it, right. So ultimately, it's the interaction between your product, your service, your sales and your customers that determine the success of the company, not the executives, not yourself, but your leaders only what you can do to influence that at best outcome. So in general, if there's a customer, that is what I say risking safety, risk and respect, risking, you know, integrity. Absolutely. The money's not worth it. That's blood money. That's not good. Yeah. That's mine. I'll get you in trouble anyway.

Jason Frazell:

Yeah, right, you know that? You know, that it? If it if it smells like that upfront, you know, it's going to come back around to bite the company into bite at some point, almost 100% of the time.

Ed Arincue:

And, you know, we're all building pipeline, so replace it. Like,

Unknown:

yeah, you can't,

Ed Arincue:

I mean, I would say sometimes this morality, or this ethics is, is almost a privilege. It's almost a luxury. But you build that luxury by being successful. So if you're desperate, and you need the money, then desperate times desperate measures. Don't be desperate. It's like building, build a healthy business have a lot of choices.

Jason Frazell:

Yeah, I love I love that. I was just thinking, as you were saying that, the idea that, hey, let's go find five more of these, this person or these people, except they're not complete assholes. Like, they can be a little asshole ish. Because their customers, you know, customers are gonna have their, you know, like, we're all customers or things too. But let's go find some more of these ideal clients for us. But they don't have to be such an asshole.

Ed Arincue:

Yeah, yeah, there's a lot you should have a big product market fit, you should have a large, total addressable market, right? Yeah, that's great. If you don't, maybe you're not in the right business.

Jason Frazell:

You're like, no, no, no, there's like three companies that could ever use our service, you're like, that doesn't feel like a very scalable business. I was listening to the book Angel out if you've read that book, like, it's about Jason Khaled Callinicus. It's about that he's like a venture capitalist in Silicon Valley is kind of a celebrity venture capitalist now. And he was the first part of the book is about how to raise capital. The second part of the book is how to fund capital. And he was talking, or no, actually the reverse. The first part is like, what's it like to be a VC? The second part is about like, what do you need to know as a founder going to get money, and he said, something along the lines of, and I'm gonna butcher this. But if you have a product, that's a brilliant idea, and requires the world to change, it's not a brilliant idea. The world is not going to change. Ed's not going to change, I'm not going to change, I want this product to be easy for me to fit into what I already liked to do. It's like this is going to revolutionize the world, you're like, great, what, how much effort do people have to do this thing? And if it's a lot, we're going to do it, period, which I thought was very brilliant, because there's so many world changing ideas that never go anywhere, because the world is not willing to change. So how does it fit into the paradigms in the context that we already know? Or how does it enhance something that's already working? As opposed to having to have us all do something different? You see this with social media companies that have come and gone and they're like, we're asking you to do this thing? And people like, No, I'm not going to do it. Too much work? Yeah. Oh, thanks. Alright, add? What would you like to ask me that I can answer for you and for everybody listening?

Ed Arincue:

Yeah, like, how did you? I'm curious about your entrepreneurial journey, because I've been, I've been a corporate salary guy, even at a high level, and I'm starting this entrepreneurial journey. You have been doing this and just enjoy it and love it. Was it a transition for you was a natural fit? What advice do you have for folks that are that are trying to break that barrier from going from, you know, corporate to self generating business?

Jason Frazell:

Yeah. Well, the first thing I would say is that I don't love it all the time. Be the first to say that. But who loves working all the time. If you know that person, I will hire them for a lot of money and teach me how to love what I do 100% of the time, it's where it's called work for him but I do love I do love most of what I do. That is true. I actually really enjoyed you know, like, as a fellow salesperson, I enjoyed being in sales most of the time. I despise the admin of it, which is still the thing I don't like it. Maybe Is this No, I was not the person who had their expense reports in on time, or it was great when Salesforce or whatever CRM we're using at the time. But the thing I would say is, it's going to take longer than you'd expect. So people go, Oh, I've got to in one year, I'm gonna make blank. You can, anything is possible, I believe that we are infinitely capable. And you always want to give yourself the practical part is give yourself more runway than you think you need. Because likely, most people, especially if you're doing it yourself, which a lot of like, I'm a solopreneur, I mean, I have support around me, but I like a lot of what I do is solopreneur, we're gonna think that based on our capabilities, we can make it happen. So give yourself more time to be really clear about your capacity for the stress of not making what you'd make as a CRO or as an enterprise software salesperson for quite a little while, like, what is your level of tolerance for that? Because my experience is, and I know a lot I've worked with a lot of entrepreneurs, I know a lot of these people. What happens generally, like clockwork is that you get presented with a whole bunch of opportunities that are quite lucrative, once you decide that you're going to do your own thing happened to me, like I've turned on two job offers this year, both of which are four years ago to my ideal jobs. And I'm like, huh, do you have to be clear about your your risk tolerance. And if you are married, or you have, you know, you have financial commitments to other people, you have kids or whatever, you need to be very clear about those two. So a lot of you like, oh, entrepreneur, entrepreneurial journey, it's so enlightened. And no, dude, it's like no different than working at a corporation, like it's challenging is x sometimes. So understand your risk tolerance. Understand your runway and give yourself more runway than you'd think. And then three. And this has been the biggest shock to me. Edie is anybody else over here. So I don't have an operations person to I mean, yes, I haven't like a virtual assistant that can do things. But when you're your own business person, there's not like a sales support ops, or there's no sales ops person or there's no, like head of finance, you can go to for all these things. So you need to be prepared to either do them yourself or spend the money to have somebody else do them. And spending the money to do them, well, isn't cheap. So if you're just starting out, and you're restricted on what you want, on your operating expenses, and at the same time, you don't love these things. You need to be prepared to do them anyway. And then as you scale and grow just like any good business, like a startup, your startup been in startups like same thing as startups, you go, Hey, Adam, you're going to be the CRO. And you're also going to wash the dishes. And we're also going to have you be the Salesforce administrator, blah, blah, blah, for now. And then as we grow, we're going to do it, be prepared that that's going to be amplified by yourself. Because there's nobody else you likely don't have the money to go, you don't have the money to hire somebody full time. And fortunately, the kind of business I run it, it's pretty operationally easy. Yeah, the other the last thing I will say for people listening is if you wanted to get in, if you want to get into a services based business, like what I run, which is, it's, I was considering I'm kind of like an actor who shows up on a stage for an hour at a time. And I'm with people. And then I go by by like, I don't have any implementation work in my, in my business, which I love, because I don't like implementation work. Yeah, is just make sure that you are sourcing yourself to do that work well. And you're constantly reinventing yourself. It's, it goes back to what you said, it was starting to feel too comfortable. Your clients are going to sense that most likely. And it's so like, and I know you and I are aligned. And this is always like growing yourself pushing yourself do that with do that with others do that through training, do that through coaching, whatever that thing is, but make sure that if it starts to feel easy, you're probably not doing a good job. Because people will sense that. Yeah, like well, this this guy has given me the same framework he's given the the last 10 people he's talked to that is pretty easy to sense at least for somebody like me, I think you're probably pretty easy to sense sniff that out too. It's kind of like what we say in like in sales, you train salespeople is like, don't have the exact same debt for every single client like at least put their logo on it make it unique, what what's unique about their situation like speak their language, understand the client, the same thing. That's the last thing I'd say if you're in like a services business where you are the product, make sure that you're constantly growing yourself as well and getting the support you need. Because you don't know it all. You're never going to know it all. And people are going to come to you and hire you because they think you know it all but you don't. So how are you consistently growing those things and being and also being willing to say I don't know, like and you know how you and I met were perceived in those rooms as experts. And soon as you get questions I'm like, I'm pretty sure the person who asked that question knows a lot more than has a more very better answer to that than I do. I wouldn't say that because we're getting paid to be that person. But, you know, and it's always the thing is people we are infinitely capable, we're also much more infinitely intellectually know a lot more than we ever give ourselves credit for. What's true for us what we're, you know, like, what we're good at, especially when you're more of an artful thing like a sales or coaching or training. People know a lot more than they give themselves credit for. That's always nothing to and you've probably worked with salespeople, like, I don't know how to do it, you're like, really? Like, yes.

Ed Arincue:

Yeah, you just reflected back. And I think that was like the coaching technique that we were taught is, when someone asks a question, whether you know that or not, you could reflect back and reflected to the rest of the audience. That's a great question from Jason. What do you think?

Jason Frazell:

And what do you all

Ed Arincue:

type type in your answer?

Jason Frazell:

You type in your answer. That's great. Great question. Great question. Thank you.

Ed Arincue:

What are you thanks for the advice.

Jason Frazell:

Yeah, coaching, not advice. Well, it's advice on this. And you're obviously a very passionate dude, what else do you what are you passionate about? Other than video games and entrepreneurship,

Ed Arincue:

I'd be remiss if I didn't mention my daughters, I have two daughters ones and one just graduated from college and grad UCR and is in marketing and she did a marketing internship at at Lifebox over the summer, very cool. I didn't know that she's got another internship at a innovative pet care. But she's looking to get into she's into games too. So she's looking into marketing at something revolving games or game development and, and, and right now she's trying to put on a tournament, like a gaming tournament with valor. And I don't know if you've ever played that game, but the first person shooter very calm. And so I'm excited for her she she studied theater and music and has great talent artistically from singing and playing standpoint, acting as well but wants to get into marketing. My other daughter is a junior, and she just finished an internship at the Getty Center in Los Angeles doing art conservation, like basically paper art conservation and, and she's, she's in her junior year at Scripps College, and I'm just happy that they're both finding, you know, things that they're passionate about, that they're good at, they like to do, and that's, and they're still, they still want to hang out with me, which is I'm surprised because I was such a workaholic, not absentee father, but he was working a lot traveling a lot. Sure. When I was there, I was a present. But the you know, they're still very sweet. And, and I talked to him, you know, every other day or so. So it's great for

Jason Frazell:

me hope I'm on the side, we have a we have an Omar, we have a six year old who adores me right now. And I'm just waiting for the moment she's like, but there's those moments already she's like,

Ed Arincue:

or it changes, you know, they change. Yeah, you can see it as they grow older. You know, they, they're so fun at that, at that age six to 10 It's great to get around 12 I think Middle School is the worst the worst time in, in, you know, in a young person's life just because of a multitude of reasons. And you got to pick a different strategy in your approach and then even different when they're in high school or in college. Yeah, just adjust for it in a, I would say, you're moving more into a less active role more listening. As you move into this,

Jason Frazell:

even as you look around, and you're like I don't want to listen to this any longer. I have so much advice for you, but you're not going to listen to me so I'm not going to give it to

Ed Arincue:

you. That's right. Like the amount of patience is that's required. It's higher surprisingly. Yeah.

Jason Frazell:

That's awesome. Congratulations. That's really that must be really fulfilling.

Ed Arincue:

It is fulfilling you know, and now that they're there I mean, they've been out out of the house for a while. Now I've been focusing on on doing more fun things I picked up picked up motorcycle racing. I went to Las Vegas Motor Speedway and and lean the bike over at high speeds and and had fun with that and want to do it again. Soon. You know, I'm doing this basketball thing, but I started playing basketball again after a little hiatus. Cool. Now I'm playing every week and I still playing golf. You know, my my goal was to shoot even par. I've done it twice, but I can't do it consistently. So I didn't want to keep on trying to get better at things. Yeah. That's

Jason Frazell:

weird. Let's talk about basketball for just a minute because I know you just you were telling me you just invested in a basketball related business. Yeah. Tell me Tell us about that.

Ed Arincue:

Yeah, it's called shoot 360 You know, they it's it's not Like where basketball meets video games, you have these shooting bays and these skill bays that we set up in a in a facility like a warehouse facility. And there are cameras that track the ball and and and soon they're going to make it more advanced and tracks and biometric movements as well. But essentially, you know, when you're shooting, and then it has a gun, which collects the balls with a net, and then passes it back to you that can be programmed by by an iPad, or computer and then tracks your individual statistics. But you know, an ideal shot has a 45 degree angle, you know, it's a little deeper to the back of the rim, and then obviously, side, the side it's centered. And so that camera will measure that and give you feedback instantaneously with every shots as you're shooting, it's high enough, is it? Is it long enough? Is it right to left, make adjustments, a coach will come in help you make some adjustments, but you're really just getting feedback directly as you're doing it and reward because, you know, when you're at the right angle, the right the right degree, the right arc, the right distance or depth, it gives you a splash zone meter, and 99% of everything in the splash zone is going to go in. Yeah. And so you're getting this constant feedback. And you and I are big, big, deep learning to learn. Yeah, performance excellence, guys. Yeah, we know, you know, from from that standpoint, the only way you get better at something or you get excellent at something is through repetition, grind, feedback, feedback, and coaching, coaching. And so this comp combines all these elements I you know, I've done it professionally in terms of running sales organizations, or my own personal hobbies. But this is a chance for me to give back to the community and teach kids that, you know, these things are possible with work discipline and feedback and coaching in a positive environment and hopefully extends not just to their basketball skills, but extends to the their lifelong learning skills, you know, sometimes just having someone believe in you, or seeing yourself grow, unlocks all this capability. So if you could do better at this, I could do better at something else. Like my own story is I couldn't hit the broadside of a barn, shooting basketballs until, you know, all the way through high school. Until I went to college, I met this guy named Manuel Gasby, who won the three point contest in the free throw contest at Georgetown University. And he was on the Filipino. He's on the Filipino culture, the Filipino Club, which was as the president of and I'm like, yeah, hey, is that something that you're born with? Like shooting that well? Or is that something that you can learn? And it's like, I don't know. But let me show you what I do. Yeah. And we went out there and drilled and he's like, Yeah, you kind of kind of make 200 to 2000 of these shots every day. Yeah. And I was like, Really, but I started doing it and I became a much much better shooter like a great shooter but I didn't know that these things were possible I thought like like you're either born with it or you weren't you have it or you don't yeah and and that fallacy whole bunch of possibilities and now you know this chance to kind of give it back at scale.

Jason Frazell:

And that sounds like a ton of fun. That is like my sweet spot is athletics coupled with technology is man I can't I can't wait to try it out some time. And also I'm a pretty decent shooter I'm it's interesting I'm a good free throw shooter. I kind of stink between the free throw line in the three point line and then behind like college three point I'm pretty decent again. So I have like the my mid range jumper is kind of garbage but my three pointers I think it's cuz I practice it a lot more but I'd be really interested to see what it thinks in my shot because I had a really I played basketball like when I was like between like the ages of nine and 13 and I had to this really wonky jump shot and then I corrected it and it's I think it's pretty it looks pretty standard now but I'm really curious I can't wait to try this sometime it sounds really It sounds Yeah, I will share this like thing if you're

Ed Arincue:

ever in Austin calm you know, they've got one in Houston they got one in Dallas. They've got one in their headquarters is in Oregon, but they've got an LA site. And you know, the LA site in the Northern California site. One is owned by the Golden State Warriors and otherwise known by the clippers. I think yeah, Tonio Spurs have like a, have a partnership with 360 down here in Texas. Makes sense. But uh, you can just go in and, and, and, and shoot and see, like, and then you can see where your inconsistency were inconsistent, but I just find it fun as hell,

Jason Frazell:

it sounds really fun.

Ed Arincue:

Just to get up there and get shots up and not have to go collect the balls because it's being shot right back at

Jason Frazell:

ya. It's amazing. It's like Thomas. Like yeah, it's

Ed Arincue:

like Top Golf. You know? I mean, there's Top Golf is more like a bowling alley experience. Yeah, there's other experiences like affinity or the TaylorMade Performance Center that is more performance oriented than I've done those. I love that too. Yeah. Because it gives you statistics gives you data, it gives you feedback. Yeah, right. And it's cool repetitiveness that gets you You know better at the thing that you want, you're better.

Jason Frazell:

Very cool. All right? What's something that you're afraid that might actually be true about you?

Ed Arincue:

I mean, I think I'm just afraid that doesn't like I'm not going to make a difference. And in the big scheme of things, I'm not like, we're all just dust. Second time, right? Like, zoom out enough, you know, you don't make a difference. And I think, you know, I've been trying so hard all my life to like, make a difference or Yeah, or even make a lot of money or whatever not like, and then I stepped back. I was like, Oh, this doesn't mean anything. I'm gonna

Jason Frazell:

usually ask and you know, the I usually at the end of the episode, like, Hey, give us words of wisdom. I'm just gonna take yours right now. It's gonna be add. We're all just dust. I should have introduces Edie nellist. Investors CRO newest. Your sales, your sales people go. But listen, I didn't make my quota. But it doesn't really matter. We're all just dust.

Ed Arincue:

We're all just dust doesn't matter. We're all

Jason Frazell:

just dust. That's funny. Yeah.

Ed Arincue:

zeal, man, you know, zoom in a little bit. And it's like, alright, so maybe I don't change the world. And this happens, you know, I don't know if that's a quote, you know, you're young. Anyone change the world. And you get older, you just one change yourself. Yeah, I love that. And I think that's what it is, like, now I'm just interested in like, getting better. The thing that I do. Yeah. And the funny thing is, is like that actually makes a bigger difference in the world.

Jason Frazell:

Oh, being a good person is arguably the best thing you can do in the world.

Ed Arincue:

That's right. Like, and so it's kind of like turning it inward a little bit more, instead of like releasing some of that pressure of wanting to, like, make a difference make an impact and to say, you know, what, like, be a better person. Yeah. I love that.

Jason Frazell:

So let's talk about this. As we start to wrap up here. How do you see the world other than, we're all just dust, which might mean switch might be the most nellist slash flat way that people ever seen the world on this show? I love it.

Ed Arincue:

The it's not, it's hard to see. See the world in positive way, right now, in my mind, I'm trying to write but there's, there's so much bad stuff happening in a global and local political way, economic way. You know, in terms of climate and disease, and, and an even ai ai is getting really scary, too. I think just over the summer, seeing the capabilities of super intelligence, being able to create art or have conversations with each other, write like, they connected AI together, they start speaking their own language to each other. We don't know what they're saying, we don't even know, you know, what the AI is doing in our own social media. And what what calculations is making Saudi it's out of control, right? So you look at all this and and it looks like we're accelerating to continuous disasters, like, more, more bad stuff, right? And so in the face of that, in the face of that, plus the fact that we're infinitely capable, right? What do we do? And it's true, like you said, Hey, as a VC, you want to only invest in things that are that are not gonna change in just accelerate, you know, the way things are. But the way things are, is we're unconsciously moving towards a nihilistic pattern. If we're constantly moving. If we're, if we're, if we're, if our default is a hedonistic tribal self. way. Yeah, the the quickest path to money is, is accelerating that path. Right? Yeah, there's this whole acceleration to this and it seems like we're moving faster in that direction versus a direction that's, that's capable that we're capable of, of infinite abundance.

Jason Frazell:

Yeah, the thing I'd say as we wrap up as we start to wrap up here is it goes back to being a good person can can sometimes be the antidote and an anecdote to that and an antidote. It is yeah, yeah. Yeah. Well that how can people connect with you?

Ed Arincue:

Well, you'll find me at life hikes along with you you know what if I could throw that in there you know, I'll be opening shoot 360 in the spring and Austin you know, when I when I solidified my next position I'll put that out there on LinkedIn as well cool. Like as I said, if you're ever heard often Let's go shoot hoops let's go play golf to play video games.

Jason Frazell:

Yes, yes. Yes. All three things. You can I can sit down you can give me some some daughters out of the house for daughter that's going to be in the house for another 12 years. Like how would probably like you said another five to six years of like, this is great and then like,

Ed Arincue:

got to just survive through the middle school portion

Jason Frazell:

survive. I'd like to do more than survive. That's certainly Rive said, thrive, thrive, thrive the way

Ed Arincue:

through that. It's just tough. It's tough. It's tough. Growing up.

Jason Frazell:

Yeah, yeah. Well, you know, this coming from a kid that I think if my parents were listening to this would not say that I was the easiest child. So, I'm sure you know, karma as they say, Karma is a bitch. So, Mom and Dad, if you're listening, I'm sure you could attribute to that. All right, Ed, as we wrap here today, leave us with some words, words, words of wisdom.

Ed Arincue:

Quick ones, live love, learn. Live. Love, learn. Love it. Edie.

Jason Frazell:

Thank you for being on. It's been a pleasure, my friend. As always, keep doing what you're doing to the video games. I can't wait to see you online some time. We got to train Gamertags Yeah, congratulations on the first daughter graduating sounds like the second one's doing well. And congratulations on whatever you're up to next with your corporate career and getting that salary and making a difference for people because I'm gonna say you make a difference for a lot of people. I know you do, because I've seen you do it. So thank you for everything you're doing.

Ed Arincue:

You too, Jason. Thank you very much. Thanks, Ed.