Talking to Cool People w/ Jason Frazell

Cassandra Thompson - Career Consultant & Speaker

September 21, 2022 Season 3 Episode 36
Talking to Cool People w/ Jason Frazell
Cassandra Thompson - Career Consultant & Speaker
Show Notes Transcript

Cassandra and Jason talk about the lost art of networking, her journey from casting amazing contestants on Wheel of Fortune and they celebrate her achievement as a top YouTuber (she has an award!)

"You can change your mind"

Cassandra Thompson is a globally recognized speaker whose work casting contestants for Wheel of Fortune, strategizing on the recruitment team at Riot Games, and coaching ambitious professionals made her into a networking paragon.

Through her talks, Cassandra helps audience members reach their career goals by leveraging the power of networking. She not only has a wonderful way of demystifying the topic but she also makes it humorous and entertaining. Her insights have reached over 9 million people on YouTube and have been featured on high-performing podcasts as well as ABC7, CNBC, and other major media outlets. Whether it's through Cassandra’s keynotes, workshops, training, or coaching, you always walk away motivated and equipped with actionable steps to implement immediately.

Cassandra is on a mission to get people back to building authentic, real relationships.

www.cassthompson.com
www.instagram.com/cassthompsonconsulting
www.linkedin/com/in/cassthompson

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Jason Frazell:

My guest on the show today is a very special guest. It's Cassandra Tao Thompson. You can't see her but she's already smiling. She's smiling. She's so happy to be here. She is a Career Strategist, which you're gonna explain to us what that is. And that's something that a lot of people would be interested in. And also a keynote speaker, speak on stages all over the place virtually during the pandemic. And now in person, Cassandra. So good to have your I am going to go back to cast because I know you. And that is how I'm going to call you but if you meet her, if you meet her, it's Cassandra, for sure. And then when you get to know her a little bit, so, so glad he made this happened. Thanks for being here.

Cassandra:

Yeah, no problem. Good to see you. Yeah, to you both

Jason Frazell:

talk to me. They're like, see you What are you talking about? This is a podcast. We'll have the one minute promotional video. So Cass, where are you located in the world today?

Cassandra:

I am in Phoenix, Arizona, where it's

Jason Frazell:

nice and hot. Isn't a pot, there isn't like 120 degrees or year round. That's, that's my impression of Phoenix.

Cassandra:

It's actually ridiculously gorgeous, from about October to May. And then the rest of the time. You're like, Why do I live here? And then October comes again, you're like, oh my gosh, this is why I live here. It's like, I've never had children. But I hear about pregnancy. Like, you know, like you forget the pains of childbirth. And that's, that's what we go through in Phoenix with weather every year is yeah, you just forget how bad it is. You're like, it's gorgeous right now.

Jason Frazell:

Yeah. That's why a lot of the you know, I'm from Minnesota originally, this is why a lot of the retire people there. Go, hey, I'm going to Phoenix or Scottsdale to my winter home, not October through April because Minnesota's sucks in the winter, unless you really like to be outside and snowmobile or ski or something. Well, I'm so glad that we made this happen. We've been talking about this for a while we've had a couple reschedules here we are. We're gonna talk about what you do. We're gonna talk about your dating life. We're going to talk about all sorts of amazing things today. All right, we're back in May, we will want to talk about her dating life that'll that'll be a different so that'll be a, that'll be the bonus episode for this podcast will monetize this thing. And this will be the bonus.

Cassandra:

Yeah, sure. Sure. It'll be a real short episode. Episode.

Jason Frazell:

All right cast. So let's kick this off with talking about something that you nerd out about. So what is something that you specifically nerd out about?

Cassandra:

I nerd out about networking and what it should be. And I'm dropping my airpot. Hold on. I nerd out about Yeah, networking and how it should be done. And everything that goes in to the job search process. I mean, I also nerd out about like Real Housewives. But I don't think that's why we're here today. So

Jason Frazell:

we could I mean, we could be you could you'd lose my interest very quickly. If you would. Real hard pivot, take a real hard pivot and let it go. If you keep talking about this, we are going to talk about your dating life. This is we're actually about to go there. Well, I know that I know that networking is one of the things you're really passionate about. And I'm a big networker as well. But I think it's a really misunderstood thing, or it's something that is just really not done well, a lot. So let's, if you wouldn't mind, I'd love to, since you're here with us get some of your this is the free bonus knowledge of the episode. Like when you say networking done, right. What do you mean by that?

Cassandra:

Yes, I mean, networking is just authentic relationship building. It should be done with it can have intention, but not agenda. So what I mean is I think people think that networking is using people this was my own past, I thought it was using people to get what I wanted, and and also a feeling of like, well, then I didn't earn it myself. And instead it's like, no, you can get to know somebody and have intention of why I really want to get to know this person because they work at that company I want to work at or I'd love to do a business deal with them some day. But you can still genuinely want to get to just know them as a person to

Jason Frazell:

Yeah, yeah. Bold concept. Just get to know them as a human being crazy. Yeah, crazy. So this is something that you've had to work on, as well. What was it about this topic of networking? Did you have a specific lesson you learned or a specific moment where you go, oh, like, I need to really change my context around this topic.

Cassandra:

Yeah. So this is part of my story that I always share is that when I was in college, I wanted to work in television. And people would tell me, it's all about who you know, it's all about, you know, you should call up this person. See if they can help. You should like very loose ties. And I felt like, oh, but then I didn't earn it and I'm not going to just use people. That's gross. Also, I didn't know what Heck, I was supposed to do like when people would say, you should get coffee, my boy we talk about it coffee like, what? What does that mean? Right? I've learned a lot since then. Yeah. And when I think it was like my sophomore year or whatever, when I was in college, a woman came as a guest speaker into my intro to mass media class. And she worked at K rock, which I know radio is like, not as prevalent now. But I believe Kerak was like the number two station in the nation. When she had some very high up position, she basically came into our class, and told her career journey, and how it started in college with her meeting. This man who owned like all the radio stations on the Eastern Seaboard, she went to school on the East Coast, and how she kept in touch with him, like, essentially, she walked us through for an hour, how she kept in touch with him over the years, and how sometimes it didn't turn into an internship. And sometimes it did. And sometimes, oh, there wasn't a position available. But through it, and I mean, I can go in that more detail, but it's not my story. But like, through her story, I learned Oh, it's not like a one time event. Networking is relationship building over time. And she did seem to genuinely like this man, it was still professional. There was nothing like creepy going on or anything. But she still treated him as a human. So like one thing that really stood out to me. And I'd always like to share this because I think it's it like really hits at home of still Treme as a human. Here's this big wig, right in radio, and she's this college student and to me, I would have been so scared of like, you know, we all panic over what we write in an email, right? She I guess they're their colleges were rivals. And they were going to be playing each other in football, and I don't know what his team's mascot was. But it had something to do with oranges. Maybe he's from New Jersey, I don't know. She took the orange candies. She took orange candies crushed them up and put them in an envelope with a card and mailed it to him and said we're gonna crush you on Saturday. There it is. And I just was like, oh, like you can you oh he's still a human being like you're treating him as a cute you're having fun. And, and she seemed at that point to like, understand his personality that that work. So that whole thing completely revolutionized for me. Oh, you just like get to know people. And weird then you can like ask them for things or you know, a favor tip or a job like it works that way. Yeah. So that was kind of like my pivotal moment, but it doesn't mean I was good at it.

Jason Frazell:

Yeah, well, it's something that comes with practice, especially if it's not a natural party personality. Something that I nerd out about is college mascots. So I believe you're talking about the Syracuse Orangemen?

Cassandra:

Oh, I probably am nice. Yeah, I'll go add that to my my slides.

Jason Frazell:

Add that to your slide, add it to your story, and I went full credit, or you will be hearing from an intellectual property attorney attorney who I actually met through networking. She's in a networking, we're in a networking group together. There you go. There it is. All right. CASS so what's something that is that you are comfortable doing something that's inside your comfort zone that you know, is, is really outside of other people's and I'm going to take networking meeting new people off the table? Since we've already talked about that? What's something else that like, in your sweet spot that you know, other people are like, no, no, thank you.

Cassandra:

Oh, I could get on a stage and talk about anything for a very long amount of time and have no problem with it.

Jason Frazell:

Anything at all? Um,

Cassandra:

I mean, you know, you like I probably could riff on anything I don't know. For you try to get me to talk about mascots. It would be a little hard, but I can find the story. Yeah, but I just don't have a fear of public speaking. And apparently, that's a real big fear for a lot of people.

Jason Frazell:

The arguably the biggest fear in America. The statistics say is this something that you've also had to developers is something that was always come naturally to you.

Cassandra:

I think some of it is natural. And some of it came as a child like, well, first off, I was that kid that I'm the youngest in the extended family. So that's important to know. So I was treated that I was treated as a baby until I was 18.

Jason Frazell:

So you're looking for a lot of attention all the time.

Cassandra:

Looking for a lot of attention. I just got a lot of data, a lot of attention got a lot

Jason Frazell:

of your If you're used to a lot of attention,

Cassandra:

there was a big age gap between me and the other cousins and relatives and everything. So I was like the little one all on my own. So anytime there was a school performance or anything, or like I had a salt stand, I would have to stand on the you know, there's like a ledge in front of fireplaces, like in the old days, there would be to make me stand up there, like my little stage, and I would like sink to the room. And so that I think, I never had shyness about that. And then when I was in elementary school, I had a brief attempt at acting and took acting classes. And so that to me, I think just made me very comfortable talking in front of people. I actually think everyone, I don't think anyone should have. I'm not for kid actors. But I do think everyone should put their kids in an acting class. Yeah, at the very least, like teach a lot. Yeah.

Jason Frazell:

At the very, at the very least, if not an acting class, like an improv class or somewhere where you have to stand up and do something in front of an audience and be seen and realize that for most people, it isn't actually that scary. Once you get over the fact that there's some people looking at me, and that's cool. So what about the other side of the coin? It's something that's uncomfortable for you. Something's outside your comfort zone that you know other people enjoy doing or happy to enjoy? Or they'll do it. It's inside their comfort zone.

Cassandra:

Anything athletic,

Jason Frazell:

including college Masca.

Cassandra:

Gooding watching it? Oh, no, I don't. Yeah, I I'm the girl who got a C in PE like, I

Jason Frazell:

How was that possible?

Cassandra:

Because if you didn't dress out, you know, if you didn't bring your like PE clothes, like that uniform that they make you change into. If you didn't bring it, you didn't have to participate in sixth grade. Oops, I forgot it. But you also got docked? Sure. Yeah. So I like counted up how many times I could miss it and still pass.

Jason Frazell:

So that's like, an English class not doing the paper. Craft and PE. Yeah. What's so interesting, I would do the paper but and you live in such a massive sports town.

Cassandra:

Well, I'm from Orange County, still a massive sports town

Jason Frazell:

by another massive sports play. But I'm you know, like you have but not only do you have all the professional sports leagues in Phoenix, you also have all the a lot of all the spring training for baseball. So it's just a big sport. It's a huge sports town.

Cassandra:

We do. No, I'm kidding. Yeah. Yeah. Like we did if I had no clue that I would have been like, this is that way. There are so many baseball fields.

Jason Frazell:

You're like, in like, it's weird in March and early. Like in late February, early March. There's a whole bunch of people come here. I don't understand. I'm also busy, and also a ton of golf courses. Cracks, that you can only golf like early in the morning or late at night or you will literally cook just amazing. Yeah. Okay. So we're not going to talk sports today.

Cassandra:

It would be a really short conversation. Yeah.

Jason Frazell:

You'd be like football. Yeah. Okay, next. Well,

Cassandra:

I even so I went to grad school, late compared to most people, I've run out of school, I had no intentions of going to grad school. When I was in college, I was like, Who wants to keep doing this. And I'm actually I'm very good at Academia. I don't actually enjoy academia. So I was like, I have the joy of never writing a paper again, can't wait. And then 10 years later decided for a career change. Oh, I have to go get a degree and a master's. And so I purposely chose Baylor. That's where I went and got my degree. Yeah, because it's football school very, like I was like, oh, it's it's a private school, but it's a bigger private school, and it's got a big football scene. And I had gone to a very small Christian School. And so I wanted that really traditional experience. And I went to like, one game and went, Oh, yeah, no, I don't I really don't care about football. Like, I don't care about football. But I went being like, yeah, I want to go to like a football school. I want that. Yeah. I want to tailgate on the whole experience. I went to went to two games in the old stadium and one game and then I was there when the brand new stadium opened which was yeah, for football people they know the stadium there's quite spectacular. I went to like the homecoming game and went well check that box

Jason Frazell:

was what do you use was funny say this about sports before you move on is also national champion men's bass college basketball two years ago. And also they always have a great women's basketball team. So

Cassandra:

I guess I've heard of this woman from our from my alma mater. Who seems to be stuck in another country right now? Yeah. Oh, that's quite. She's quite a big deal.

Jason Frazell:

She's She's a Yeah. Yeah. Brittany, I didn't realize she went to Baylor. Yep.

Unknown:

He did. All right. CASS

Jason Frazell:

so speaking, yeah, you you, you are a speaker, which means you have content to deliver. So I would like to ask this question of people who have already written a lot of speeches. Okay. give you five minutes. Okay, you get to deliver a speech in five minutes and five minutes, only the timer, you get hooked. The Oscar music plays in your out in five minutes. Okay, what would you talk and the whole world got to hear it? Okay. What would you talk about? And what would be your call to action to all of us listening?

Cassandra:

What would I talk about? I would break down why networking is not as terrifying as you think it is. It's not. It's not using people. It's not inauthentic. Just because there's intention. And I would share my own networking disaster story and how I recovered. And, and the simple steps to get started because we all need to start building relationships again, because they're the cornerstone, my air pods. Gosh, sorry about this. You can't see but my air pods keep falling out, folks. Sorry. Um, why we all need to get back to building relationships, because we're all online too much or not chatting with each other. Yeah.

Jason Frazell:

I love it. Yeah. So it's like, it starts with networking. But it's actually about how to build authentic relationships is your big your big stances, which makes sense, knowing a little bit about you and your brand. And everything is like, your thing is people first people matter, relationships matter. And with the right relationships, you can do almost anything, have their job and all those things. Yeah. Well, I love this, we're gonna head to a commercial break. And then you've just really set the stage for sharing a story with us when we come back, because you can't leave that cliffhanger. That did not do it. Yep. Networking disaster. So stay tuned, we're gonna go to a brief commercial break. We'll be right back. And then we're going to hear about a networking disaster. All right, Cass, we're back. So usually I asked guest at this point, what else you want us to know about you? And because it's my show, and I'm the host, and I'm the boss here. At least I like to tell myself that. I want to start with your networking disaster story. And then I want to, I want to hear what else you'd like to share with us what else we should know about you. So hit us with a story. And I my guess is this is a story that's also inside many of your speeches. Because that story should always be in speeches. Yeah. Hit us. Hit us with a story.

Cassandra:

Well, because also, yeah, people need to know, like I said before, just because I learned the lesson in college doesn't mean I was good at executing it. And and, yeah, especially when you're speaking, it's like, I don't want you to think I'm up here some expert that's not working on this all the time, or hasn't been in that spot. And so I love sharing this story. So I did, I achieved my goal from College of working in entertainment, actually, didn't I, I have a whole separate talk about how to network your way through an internship. And I did a great job with that and ended up with job offers from four places.

Jason Frazell:

It's really valuable topic for people coming out of school,

Cassandra:

including and it sounds very braggy but my whole point is the stuff I did anyone can do. So I did a great job there. But then I got into the industry, I ended up accepting a job at wheel of fortune in jeopardy. And

Jason Frazell:

is that Merv Griffin enterprises? Is that what that's is that yesterday?

Cassandra:

It was yeah, it was syndicated through them now at CBS. I believe unless it got bought again, it's CBS distribution and we were owned by Sony because there's like 17 companies involved in how this yeah so I ended up working I got promoted once ended up working in contestants that wheel of fortune and being like an ambitious I don't know 2425 year old was already kind of looking at like what's my next move going to be because while Wheel of Fortune treated me wonderfully I have nothing bad to say about them it's a it's a great well oiled machine and so no one leaves it and this is right on the beginnings of social media. And so no one's no one's really using that for networking yet. But I know that to get my next job you got to network right like Oh, again it goes back to the it's very much in any industry is like you have to network to meet people but that in particular is very much a who you know, industry. Yeah. But I was really stuck of like, I'm in this great job. But I want to learn about things like development or other production roles. And I don't know how to I can't even find anyone to network with because I'm on the show where everyone has been here forever. Well, the executive producer of Wheel of Fortune was developing two new game shows. And they were doing test runs for a couple of months. And they hired our department to come work a couple nights a week, to help in the development of these game shows and bring in like practice contestants. And so when I went to do that, now I met three new people. Right, I had, there was the executive producer, the creator, and then what the development person. And so we worked on that show together at night, and I got to know them a little bit. And we like, you know, we chat here and there on set and have a good time. But I waited until the show was over and asked the development guy like, hey, could we meet for lunch? You know, development is something I'm interested in. And I'd love to hear more about it. And I think I also need to set the context of like, sometimes we all talk about networking, like it's so easy to do, and you forget that, oh, no, you still have a job attached. And there's that fear of, I don't want the people at my work knowing that I'm asking questions, because it's what if they fire me because they think I want to leave and all that. I've learned that 90% of the time, that is not real people, like your work doesn't really care. But I was very scared about that. So that was also part of that. That brought on a lot of nerves of even like sending the email. When he said yes, to meet for lunch, again, just I need to remind everyone, this is somebody I knew this is somebody I had like, chatted with multiple times. But I was finally getting my shot to ask these questions. Like I was finally getting my chance to be like, tell me about development. Tell me about how you got started, what do I need to do to get into it, all these things. And I put so much pressure on that lunch of like, this is my chance this one, lunch is my chance. That's how I saw it. That and then the lunch was like, I scheduled it at a dumb time that it was across town. And I had to get back at a certain time for a meeting that I couldn't be late for. And like, so I just scheduled poorly. So that stressed me out. So I come to this lunch. And I was the biggest weirdo on the face of like, just I think my shoulders were up at my ears at we went to I still remember we went to the daily grill, which if anyone's been to a daily grill, it's kind of got a menu of the size of like a Cheesecake Factory like I had already looked. This is again in the date. This makes me sound so old. But this is again in the days before. Like, everybody looked up restaurant menus before they went and so I get there, but I had I get there. And I looked at it for a second I set it down. And I just sat. And he's like, what he had to look. Yeah. And he's like, do you already know what you want? And I said, I've just been really wanting to Chinese chicken salad. So I thought I would get a Chinese fit and they have a Chinese chickens out. Like What a weirdo. He asked me what music I liked. And I couldn't answer. Like, truly, like I had just built it up so much in my head. I wrote an apology email when my god like I was like, sorry, I seemed real off today. Thanks for answering my question. Like, just

Jason Frazell:

did he tell you that you felt off? Or did you interpret that and then sent him like a proactive email?

Cassandra:

I sent a proactive email because it was the person sitting across from him was not the person. He had, like, talk to here and there for three months. Like I know he was like, Who is this? Like what happened? And, you know, but interestingly, I am Facebook friends with him. And he is like I share this story and talks all the time and I've thought about this I'm like, I need a message and be like, Hey, do you remember this?

Jason Frazell:

I have a video of you need to do a zoom meeting. Here's here's my some more IP to put into your presentations. Okay, do a zoom meeting and record it and be like, was I weird and have them just be like, yeah, when Cass tells you she's being weird she was actually being really weird like this is this is a very true story.

Cassandra:

Weird. Yeah, I know. I might just do it because I just Yeah, I don't care now. It's hilarious now. Um, but ya know that lunch was so bad that I spent so If anyone knows the Enneagram, I'm an Enneagram. One, we can't let certain things go. We can't let mistakes go. Yeah. Every day on the car ride to work for two years. I thought about that lunch. Oh, dear God, this was terrible. And it really scared me off of networking. Now, I did redeem things with him. Like a year and a half later I went, we chatted again, I was because I was at least trying to keep up my network of two people. And like, when I worked in entertainment, I had a network of two people for the first four years. And, and I redeemed myself with him at that one. But still just, it was bad because this goes to like what I was saying before, as much as I learned it was relationship building, and I was trying to treat it that way. I still treated it transactionally I acted like this one lunch, I have to prove that I will be good to be hired down the road that he will think of me if any positions come up. And this is it. And it's like, not just have a lunch. Just have a lunch. Like that's it. So that's the story. I don't know if it's as entertaining or exciting to you. But it was during my well. I mean, the fact like the details, I remember what I ordered. I remember what booth I started. Fun fact, I ended up working in that same center where that daily girl was, like, three different times in my entertainment career. So I had to keep going back to the scene of the crime. Yeah, like happy hours and stuff. And like, I just don't I don't like this. I remember I accidentally didn't get validation, and I had to pay $16 for that parking ticket. Like for the pocket like that it. It is a seminal memory in my life.

Jason Frazell:

I have so many questions, but I'm just going to ask you one. Okay. How many sessions with your therapist have been spent on this specific this specific trauma from earlier in your life?

Cassandra:

That was not worked through in therapy, but that was worked out in those two in those car rides for two years?

Jason Frazell:

Yeah, self therapy always proven to be good. The the lesson I you know, the lesson I take from that is the lesson that I think is just a good overarching lesson in life is just Don't be weird. Like, just be yourself.

Cassandra:

Yeah. Be yourself. And like, this was someone I already knew. So it shouldn't have been as awkward but one thing I always love to tell people is like, give yourself permission that it is going to be awkward. Like the first time you meet someone for a coffee. Yeah, there's gonna be a weird pause or like, you're gonna miss hear what they said and answer weird and then go Wait, is that what you said? Oh, like, that's okay. That again, that's being human. It's okay.

Jason Frazell:

Or, or the. The other thing I'll say about this before we move on is yeah, just owning Hey, just let you know. I'm a little nervous right now. Because I really respect your career and I'm just I am a little I'm a little like, that's fairly endearing to most people just be like, hey, like, I really admire your career and and I'm, it's a little nerve racking for me being here. I'm just want to say that to you, like who's who's who's going to the way of like, pretending that you have it all together when you're incredibly nervous, like humans were built to be able to read that energy and other people. So if you think you're being calm, cool and collected, you're like, Ooh, no, this person just being weird. But it all worked out. You ended up on my podcast, which is likely the pinnacle, this is this is kind of the this is this is the moment that it's all come to. So here we are.

Cassandra:

This was the top, I've done it all. I'm done. You

Jason Frazell:

had to get you had to go through that lunch in order to get here. There you go. It's all part of journey. Well, what else? Let's take a couple more minutes. What else do you want us to know about you?

Cassandra:

What do you need to know about me? I'm such an open ended question recent.

Jason Frazell:

Sorry, for the Enneagram. One question. I know Yeah, like, Well, what else do you think would be helpful? What else do you want us to know?

Cassandra:

Yeah, I mean, I think I'm just gonna stay on the networking track, I will say, um, I think we all know people matter. But it's, we're all very task focused. We live in a world of data and analytics. And if this then that kind of thinking, and so it's so much easier and myself included, like, it is so much easier to look at my to do list and send one more email, write one more blog post or whatever, then to reach out to somebody and just be like, Hey, how are you doing? Like that feels. I always say like, networking feels murky, you don't have the direct line of where is this going to lead? And so you can't always see the value at the beginning. Whereas when you get to cross something off a list, you see the value before you even started. And so it's it is like a real discipline. Again, preaching to myself Here too, it is real discipline to say like, I'm going to take time in my day to make that phone call and check in with somebody or to send that email reaching out. And then I think the other thing I'd say with that is, or the other thing I want people to know is reach out to the people you already know. Like, some, some people are so busy trying to like, collect. And I really do mean, like some people collect, we don't want to collect people. But some people do say is like just collecting names and relationships. And yeah, you instead, Kimbell, I mean, like I said, those first years in entertainment, I had three connections, and I just worked those connections. And that's fine. And then like reaching out to old coworkers, reaching out to people from college, or even just your friends. Making the time for them is still a huge part of it. Yeah. And so it doesn't always have to be getting to know new people, because it's relationship building, you can keep reaching out to the people you already know. Yeah,

Jason Frazell:

that's for those people that are building businesses or looking for new jobs or looking. I mean, I'm, are like looking to date or like looking for somebody to watch your dog, like most likely those people are in either your first second or third degree networks. Yeah, 99% of the time. But you're right. Like, one of the ways we know each other is through brand strategy work. And you do a lot of this to somebody, like I need to build my email list and you do this, I need to grow my YouTube and that that's all important to be out there with this external marketing. But most people can generate a pretty darn nice business as an entrepreneur, doing business or sharing what they're up to with people that actually know you like you and trust you, which those people on YouTube and those people on your email list. They don't. They might like you and they might kind of trust you. But they don't actually know you. They only know your marketing, which is different. So very cool. Yeah, very cool. All right. So now, it's part of the show where you get to ask me something. Okay, nobody what's coming here? So what do you want to ask me that I can answer for you and everybody listening?

Cassandra:

Oh, yeah. Well, I like to stay on the theme and a topic.

Jason Frazell:

What are your one?

Cassandra:

I know. Well, I took a reel off and be like, so what's your favorite map? Not that bad off? Like, what's your favorite mascot? But again, that would be a conversation where I go cool.

Jason Frazell:

You like Oh, yeah.

Cassandra:

I know you like networking. It's something to do. You don't shy away from what are more like three biggest tips, takeaways, etc? Yes, um,

Jason Frazell:

yeah, I do. Like I do like networking. It's, it would definitely be an answer for me of like, what's inside your comfort zone? Like I have no fear, or challenge walking into a room of people? I don't know. And just like talking to people. So my Yeah, my tips would be lead with curiosity. So to jump in, this is another thing comes naturally made. One I'm a coach, too. I'm just generally curious, genuinely curious about people. And I like people, which makes networking so much easier. If you don't like people networking would be miserable. Very true, genuinely curious. And networking. I really, and this is a, it's a bit of a tactical thing. But it's just the way I lean into because I know if I don't actually think about this, I'll do the other as I try to let the other person talk at least 75% of the time. I'm reliable to fill up the space. Well, I have all sorts of stuff to say all the time from my natural thing. And just asking, asking curiosity based questions and letting people talk. And then the third thing, and this is specific to this is specific to something I learned. There's a networking platform called Lunch Club, which I don't know if you know, Lunch Club. I like Lunch Club. I've been on lunch club for two years now. I do it every now and again. It's really nice. I learned this from one of the people I met on lunch club is when I'm networking with somebody and it's virtual. I actually like to not look up. I don't like to connect with them on Facebook, Instagram, LinkedIn, I don't actually want to know it was just as for relationship building, so that I can hear in Cass's words or in Jason's words, Hey, what are you up to and hear it? Because that is just a portrayal? That's the external branding of it. And in Lunch Club, specifically, you put a profile in it. So it's basically dating but first networking, that's yeah, let's call it basic dating, networking. But one of the things that somebody says, they said, Hey, I actually didn't look at your profile, like to just talk with you about I said, That's brilliant. So I started doing that. And we have much more fun conversations than people that are like so I see that you're a Career Strategist and a speaker Tell me about that like that. Yeah, in a way that's kind of the low hanging fruit and also kind of the boring conversation. Yeah, you Is, is that so that that's, like, leader the curiosity? And if you're not genuinely curious then don't do it. Yeah, fake curiosity is really lame, like, oh, so what do you do for a living? And you could see like, you can see the wheels turning as the filter of can this person helped me? Can I make money off this person? And if those two words like it's the worst, it's the transactional part of networking that most people hate. Yeah, yeah. So it's be curious, have the other person speak most of the time? Listen, if you ask me a question, I'm gonna speak, I'm not gonna be weird, but really like put the focus on it. This is like dating stuff to like, not in the dating scene. I've been married for a long time. And then three, like, I actually don't want to know everything about this person. The caveat being if I was going in for a job interview, I want to be well prepared for that, which I know is another one of your wheelhouse, but we're talking like, you're like, Hey, Jason, I have a friend of mine, I just think you should connect to them. I don't really need you to spend send me a bunch of information. I'm not going to do a ton of research, I'd rather just do that. I'd rather like get to know actually, that person.

Cassandra:

Well, yeah. So thank you have. I liked that? Because that's where you have the real conversation, because that's what I tell people to even about, like informational interviewing, which is a huge part of like, networking for getting jobs and things. Yeah, that's ironically, that is what getting coffee means. But no one explained to me in college is just meeting somebody and asking them about what they do. But what I always tell people is like, yeah, come with your questions. But if you both sit down, and you know, as you're making small talk, you find out you're both really into all the gossip surrounding Don't worry darling at the Venice Film Festival or whatever. That's very popular right now. You I know. And you talk about that for the whole hour. Who cares? Like, right, you connected as people you can follow. Now they like you. Now you can follow up and go, Hey, I didn't get to ask you. You know, we got so caught up. I didn't get to ask you this question. Can you answer it for you know, like, yeah. But if you're if you're so focused on, I have to get answers to these questions, or this person works at this place. I have to know what they think about this thing. It's going to feel strenuous. Yeah. miserable. Yeah. I like that. And also the the 2575 hours. Yeah, that's where it's at. Some people that's easier. Some people that's harder.

Jason Frazell:

Yeah. I mean, if you're, if you're trying to drag something out of somebody, then it's probably not going well, anyway. No. Yeah. Yeah. All right. So Cass, what's the thing that you are most proud of?

Cassandra:

Ah, what am I most proud of? So it might sound weird, but I think I'm this is like, the biggest life lesson I give to other people. And it's because I had to learn it myself as you can change your mind. And so I so what I'm most proud of is probably that I have not, I hit a point in my late 20s where I went, I don't really like this entertainment thing anymore. I want to go do something else. What kind of happened over a couple of years, but learning like, oh, it's not a mistake. It's just an experience. I think I was. I'm like kind of all over the place. I was very in college and in my early 20s I quote unquote, did everything right. I had one internship that led to a bigger internship. Like I said, I networked my way into a corporate job but the number one and number two syndicated game show like syndicated shows in America, right, I was getting picked up. pre recession, I was getting picked up in a limo and flown first class and business it like 25. I'm like wearing converse, and jeans in first class. Next, all these businessmen. And so on paper, it looked like I did everything right. And I thought I had to keep following that path. And kind of an end, but was very afraid of making a mistake in any area of life. I don't think that's the same thing as perfectionism. I think they're different. The it was just fear of like, oh, but what if that wastes my time but what if that waste my money but what if it? What if trying that job throws me off my career track and finally hit a point where I went? I'm just gonna try something and if I don't like it, it's okay. And then that led to other things that I tried. So first thing I tried was in 2008, I wanted a new job, but if anyone remembers, it's kind of recession and everyone had a hiring freeze. And so I went, Well, I can't get a new job. But I've always wanted to be a TV host. Not always that came a little later in life, but like, had some Inklings that that could be something to work for me, I lived in LA, you could take hosting classes. So I went and took hosting classes because I want I know, it's a long shot, but none of the other things can pan out right now. So might as well take it and kind of from that experience learned, like, Oh, this isn't a mistake. It didn't pan out the way I'd wanted it to. But I met a ton of people, I learned a bunch of things. I think it's why I had kind of a jump start feeling comfortable when I went on YouTube. For my own business. Yeah. But from there like, right, that then gave me the courage to leave my job at a certain point and the courage to go back to school at a certain point and like, spend two years again, so honestly, the thing I'm proudest of is kind of changing my personality, but like, very much what was a core part of myself until about 28. And realizing like, life's too short try. Try stuff.

Jason Frazell:

Yeah, what I hear there's like a mind, it's like a reframe. And it's a reframe of the internal dialogue of the external circumstances. Yes, which is not an easy thing to do. No, because you come in for 28 years with a specific story of how it's supposed to go, how you're raised, and nothing wrong with how you're raised, I'm sure but it's like, it's just like the things you bring from your childhood, the academic, your academia, what you believe to be true, and to actually be able to, to, like, I call that elevation, to get elevation outside of what you know, to be true. And take a look, I would look at, you get to look down and be like, Oh, if I was a third party observer, and say, like, hey, this isn't actually what I want anymore. That's super cool. Because that's something that some people don't have facility to do, and probably never in their whole life get a chance to do.

Cassandra:

Yeah, thank you. Yeah. Yeah.

Jason Frazell:

Well, this is kind of the perfect setup for the next question. Okay. What's something you're afraid might actually be true about you?

Cassandra:

Oh, geez. Am I in therapy now? Good grief. Um You're going to edit out my long pauses on here, because Wow. Um,

Jason Frazell:

now I'm not going to

Cassandra:

know you should that's like dead air. People are gonna be like, Good grief. This girl.

Jason Frazell:

interviewing a broadcast person.

Cassandra:

I'm like, terrible. Um, what? Okay, so the question, what is something?

Jason Frazell:

What's something that you're afraid might? What's? What's something you're afraid might actually be true about you?

Cassandra:

Oh, I, I always think people don't like me. I think I'm kind of unlikable. That's true. Oh, my God. deep one. Yeah, you did?

Jason Frazell:

Such a good one. Yeah, no, no, I was cast. This is such a good one. Because the second part of the question isn't what do you do to compensate for that fear? And I think it's pretty obvious that you've leaned into networking, getting to know people and building relationships, like we all and I've said this on the show for years now. part of who we are in the world is to compensate for who we don't, who we believe us to actually be at our core. So that would make that would really make sense that if if that's a you believe, like, and that's just like your psyche, like, Oh, you're you're unlikable, then you're going to try really hard to be likable. Through networking and relationships, like it's the, it's not even overcompensation. It's just the way our brains work is how are you going to then appear to the world so you know, in your words, how do you how do you compensate for that? Or how do you deal with that is probably a better word cut maybe compensates a bad word for it.

Cassandra:

Yeah, how do I compensate for that? I think part of it is oh, I fully like now we live in a world of so much education around absolutely anything that like I've read books on like ability I've I've like, watch Charisma on Command on YouTube like am I doing any of these things? Am I obnoxious? What am I doing? My like methodical brain loves all that stuff. Um and I think too, for me it's a lot of like praying to know what is true now we'll get on the spiritual side praying, you know, like what is true? And like, what's in my head and evaluating? Not evaluating for two years like before, but evaluating situations and going like Was that kind of frustrating? Or were you Were you okay in that? Did you talk to Matt like, thinking it through to see what's real or what's not?

Jason Frazell:

And thus ends the end of our therapy session. Classifying colors, I'll send you the invoice later. Alright, cast, how do you see the world?

Cassandra:

Oh, how do I see the world? Can you expand upon that?

Jason Frazell:

Yeah. What's your philosophy around the world? Like, how do you see it? Like, you wake up in the morning and you look out at the 1000s or millions of inputs to your brain? And, you know, you just how do you see the world? What's your like? How do you see it? Like some people say, Oh, I see it as a place filled and mostly good people, some people see as opportunity. Some people will say, I see it as a place, it's filled with suffering. Just whatever, whatever is true for you. Yeah,

Cassandra:

I would say, why don't we see the world is that it's, I mean, the way I see the world, I guess, is it's God's creation. And at its core, it's beautiful. So I think that's a huge piece of it. And I think with that, in terms of the people on the planet, I think we are all designed with a purpose. And with our own unique roles, some bigger and more up front and some more behind the scenes and we all are constantly searching to figure out what our place is in this world.

Jason Frazell:

I love it. And this is something now as a good wrap up today. Career Strategist speaker you speak and specifically help people with that around their careers on networking. So how can people connect with you?

Cassandra:

Yeah, so you can, easiest place to like, learn more is YouTube, and I do read all comments. So if you put in Cass Thompson career advice, I'm there.

Jason Frazell:

Great channel, by the way, lots of subscribers.

Cassandra:

And there's my play button is my silver.

Jason Frazell:

She has, she has a plaque from YouTube, just to just gonna say

Cassandra:

it's exciting. And I you can also just go to Cass thompson.com. To learn more.

Jason Frazell:

We'll put the put all that in the show notes. Last thing cast, I just want to thank you for being on it's so good to finally make this happen. Can't wait forever to hear your wisdom and brilliance and on the topic of brilliance. Love if you'd leave us with some short and sweet, short and sweet words of wisdom and think about this would fit on a Instagram post the art of the Instagram posts not the text of the Instagram post that one of my guests like Well, which one like the art of it.

Cassandra:

The art of wisdom you can change your mind.

Jason Frazell:

You can change your mind. Thank you, Cass that was awesome. I really appreciate you having you on and I look forward to talking with you soon.

Cassandra:

Thanks for having me.