Talking to Cool People w/ Jason Frazell

Aras Toker - Co-Founder and CEO of Peace of Mind (POM)

July 27, 2022 Season 3 Episode 28
Talking to Cool People w/ Jason Frazell
Aras Toker - Co-Founder and CEO of Peace of Mind (POM)
Show Notes Transcript

Aras shares his journey from Wall Street to Silicon Valley Founder, Jason and Aras debate American vs Europe Football and Aras talks about his health journey that has led him to creating a business specifically built for helping employees find more well-being and joy at work.

"Leave the world a tad bit better than you found it."

Aras is an entrepreneur, a business development veteran with over 15+ years of experience in startups and large corporations. He is a connector, enjoys relationship building, and truly cares about people's health. After reversing his chronic health condition through lifestyle interventions, he co-founded two digital health startups to help others that are experiencing physical and mental health challenges. In his journey, he formed strong patient communities and discovered effective ways of reducing employee burnout. He is currently building a community-focused mental resilience program, Peace of Mind, with a behavioral change engine using therapeutic nutritional psychiatry, movement, mindset, and sleep regimens to increase employee resilience. Aras studied Math-Economics at UCLA for his undergrad and got his MBA in Sport Management from the University of San Francisco.

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Jason Frazell:

Everybody my guest on the show today is Rs toker, co founder and CEO of peace of mind. He said dad of a young child. He's a husband. And he's a soccer Chronicles crazies, the word we talked a little bit about this. We'll find out more. And Mike this might come up with Aris, so good to have you here today. Everybody listening, I met RS through a mutual friend and podcast guest. And when I heard about him, I said, I got to have this person on my podcast. I am so excited. We're here today. Thanks for being here. Welcome.

Aras Toker:

Thank you, Jason. Thanks for having me. And I'm a crazy soccer fan. Yes.

Jason Frazell:

Crazy soccer fan. What's your team?

Aras Toker:

Originally the one I grew up in as the gal tesserae. It's a big team from Istanbul. But I'm also a big, big big Liverpool fan. Okay, so for all the Premier League lovers.

Jason Frazell:

Yes, that's a Liverpool. There it is. Yeah. So as you can hear, you're not American. I'm not. So you're Turkish. And now living in America. So where are you? You're not in Turkey. I know where you're coming in. Where are you coming in today from?

Aras Toker:

I live in San Francisco. Well, actually near San Francisco and the Bay Area. A little bit north of it. Yeah, I grew up in Turkey. In Istanbul, a crazy town of 18 million people, which I recently visited, it became even more crowded. But I moved to America. When I was 18. For college, it was supposed to be a four year deal. Here we are. 20 plus years later,

Jason Frazell:

20 plus years. Yeah. Nice. All right, we're gonna get right into it. We got a lot to talk about today. So let's kick us off here today. What's something you nerd out about? Besides soccer?

Aras Toker:

You know, good question. I think lately, or I've been in when when I was younger, too. I was really curious. And I still am about philosophy in kind of more in the sense of meaning of life kind of thing. It was always something fascinating for me, because clearly, there's no clear answer about what the meaning is. But at the same time, you know, kind of just hearing from different perspectives, and I read on my own because I curious how people perceive it, then what motivates people to live a more fulfilling life? And that's something that is super interesting to me. And, and yeah, now because I'm practicing, really fulfilled life, necessarily, but I'm aiming at it at least that's a good one. But also, it's a really, it makes you think, and that part is also good on my own. Let me just like ponder around in my backyard. Yeah, what's the really meaning here? Why are we here? So it's all it's all kind of fun for me.

Jason Frazell:

I know you've listened to a little bit of the show, or maybe quite a bit of it, you know that what comes next is I'm gonna challenge this, and I'm gonna ask you a follow up question. I'm going to ask you, and I'm, and I'm willing to share mine too. Like, what? What have you for you specifically? Because? Well, I'll give you my opinion here. I believe the meaning of life is unique to each of us. For you, specifically, what do you see as the meaning of life? And I'm not asking for like the gospel or the truth, but like, what have you from somebody who has studied this? What have you come to realize about your yourself?

Aras Toker:

I think the meaning of it, in my opinion, is in the short period of time, and I call it a short, even though you may live forever, at hopefully more? How much of a dent can you really make by leaving this place? A tad bit better than you took it with? Are you starting? So I think at the end, you know, there I read something about there's a billion people sorry, 100 billion people actually lived on that. So ever since the 100 billion. Yeah, 100 billion is a number. So if you look at all the people, not obviously currently, but in the past, so there has been so many lives coming in and out. What did this people leave and pour that like, you know, let's call it the engine of people that moved us. So and how much of a dent did they make? And I think more fulfilling life or some kind of somewhat of an interesting life will be to be able to say, Hey, listen, like it was somewhat of a, in my own world. It doesn't have to be a revolutionary thing. It could be just, you know, raising a kid, that kid became more, you know, in tune with their society neighborhoods and somehow, like awareness of that could be fulfilling right there. So that's what it is. It doesn't have To be this crazy grandiose idea or fulfillment.

Jason Frazell:

Well, the other thing I heard you share that landed for me when you first answered this was sounds like also for you the meaning of life is the journey through life. Because you mentioned like the exploration, the the, the inquiry of it.

Aras Toker:

Yeah, I think it stems from Jason like, and I wasn't self aware, before I get I went through the sickness, which is nothing to kind of talk about, primarily here, but it actually did change my life. Before that, I was more of a yes. And immigrant in this country trying to make money, try to Wall Street, here's a ladder I want to climb. It all seemed like the right path. But it wasn't something that I necessarily want, it was more about what, you know, opportunities in front of me, are the people that told me about that will be good life. And then going through a physical kind of, you know, painful, you know, 10 years where I had the surgeries and things like that, you realize that, you know, meaning of life, or things that will make you happy is definitely not something specifically about dollar amounts or earnings, but little things. And in that journey is the is the happiness, right? So that's the, even in the painful times, you find little glimpses of happiness. So I think I realized you're right, I think it's more of a journey of the whole thing. And it's not like ending or here, I hit it, I got it, I got the meaning. And that part is actually landed on me and I want to live a life that doesn't. Doesn't let me forget about that part. And then we're taking anything for granted as well. So

Jason Frazell:

beautiful. Beautiful. All right, Eric, what's, what's something that's inside of your comfort zone inside of your comfort zone? That you know, other people either will not do? Or they're very uncomfortable doing?

Aras Toker:

I would probably think meeting people is something that I really enjoy. It's, it's like, I heard people, some people get nervous. And obviously, I'm like, what are they going to say? How are you gonna break the conversation? I love it. The reason is, I got really curious, how does this person proceed live? What are their narratives and what like, my mind goes to these things. Even if I'm just getting their name down, I usually forget their name. Because of these reasons, I got really curious way they look, I already have my own perceptions. I'm like, Okay, let's not have a perception. So it's a fun little game. And I would initiate like I would meaning if even random person like I work in a co working space, and somewhere in the kitchen, let's say I just saw somebody say hi. Maybe initiate, like, more than Hello. Right. So like, I think it's a little bit more curiosity, to be honest. Yeah, I do enjoy it. Because I'm like, you don't know we're gonna meet. Yeah, and I think it's an opportunity without being obviously creepy and like talking to every single person, but it's more if an opportunity comes, I'll take and I'll be the first person that kind of initiates I think that's a little bit in a uncomfortable place. For some people. That's what that is. Yeah, that is more comfortable. Yeah.

Jason Frazell:

I'm with you. I'm thinking back to the first time we met. And I'm like, Oh, this is going this is a really easy conference, because this is where in my comfort zone too. I've shared this. People ask me questions on my on the show, and it's why I do the show because sometimes I interview guests, and I've never looked at them or spoken to them until about one minute before you press record. Totally in my comfort zone. And then I have other people in my sphere that they're not interested. Right, they need to know like, Who is this Iris person? What are they up to? What's in it for me? Why would I spend a half hour and I think you and I like we hit it off right away? I'm like, This is great. Like let's get curious about each other. So yeah, totally. So now I'm really now I'm I feel like we're on like a matchmaking game to see if we have the same thing. It's out of our comfort zone. So what's the other side of the coin for that for you? What's something that you just you're not comfortable doing? And you know, other people are really comfortable doing?

Aras Toker:

Yeah, I mean, it's first thing comes to my mind is probably like related to language, even though I've been here 20 plus years. English shouldn't be an issue. But when it comes to storytelling, whether it's a stupid little joke, excuse my language, but or just like a deep story that I really want to tell it colourful. I always pondered later on oh my god, I should have told it this way. Why did and it's just not as it's not easy. For me. It's my point. Perhaps for a more natural liquor or English speaker that it could be easier. I don't know if it's just the language, whatever it is, maybe it's just like not so language a problem, but it's not easy for me. And I think I'm training I'm like, finding ways to storytelling things more compelling and like finding the Uh, there's an art to it. Absolutely. But still not natural. Sure it's something amazingly natural. They don't need anything.

Jason Frazell:

You're like, I'm I'm finding ways to practice like going on podcasts and all these other things.

Aras Toker:

Myself. Yeah, he's like, yeah,

Jason Frazell:

exactly. Do you find storytelling in your native language to be easier?

Aras Toker:

Good question a little bit better. Yes, I will say that I'm, I'm like nailing it in Turkish. But definitely, it feels like the words will come up a bit more easy. And I'll pick my vocabulary is probably more like depth, and I can pick like the right word that could be more enticing in that context. So

Jason Frazell:

yeah, those will make sense. Yeah, as you were saying that I was obviously listening. And I was also thinking about my relationship with that. And I don't speak any other languages. I'm pondering over here, how I feel about my storytelling ability, because I train people in this. Yes. And at the same time, I wonder how good I am sometimes. I'm like, Huh.

Aras Toker:

I thought sure. The little that I know about you from the first meeting? Yeah, I feel like it's a fairly, you know, audience grabbing, at least from eye contact, or like you kind of get people to really, because it's all about that. Right. Let them to really Yeah, about it.

Jason Frazell:

Yeah. Well, thank you, I appreciate that. I do have a lot of training in it. I'm going to I'm going to humble myself and say I do have a lot of training in it. But there's always room for more. I was actually talking to somebody, I was talking to a client about the state marketing and telling stories and your marketing, because that's what people remember. And we were walking through the hero's journey, if you know what that is. Yeah, there. Yeah. Most people know what the hero's journey is. And how does that relate her? Her question was, hey, you know, I really want to tell this story of our company, because it's a family run company. I said, What's the hero's journey of your company. And then we had a really fun 45 minute coaching call about the hero's story of her of her, she runs a she runs a therapy practice. And it was really fun to hear, which is not that common to small family owned in this day and age. A lot of them are owned by conglomerates. Now it is really fun. So my guess also is if you if I was to ask you to tell us a story, I'd be like, Wow, that was really good. My guess is this is partially your own internal critic, but we're not going to go we're not going to go straight down that route today.

Aras Toker:

Oh, vicariously tell you stories. Yeah,

Jason Frazell:

this will be the second time on will will really test this. So Eris give you five minutes, you get to broadcast out to the entire world. So we can pretend that the whole world is listening to this podcast? I can I know my numbers. That's not true. I would be very wealthy. If that was true. It's not true. But fair number of people listen. So five minutes, you get to give a speech to as many people as you want to hear it, what would you talk about? And at the end of your speech? What would you want us as the audience to do?

Aras Toker:

Yeah. I think I would talk about and that's something that I genuinely get interested about. What I'm doing right now at my company, too, is things that we worry about in life. It's all about the perspective of what we should be looking at, compared to some of the other people's difficulties or challenges that they're facing. And I think if I were to have a chance to talk to the entire world, I'll just say that not to diminish some people's worries and kind of compare them with others. But more about, think, your own worries, or challenges and things that will stress you out, make your one and try to look at it from a larger perspective. And at the end, I think the best call to action is try to do things that are going to make you sleep better at night. And I think at the end of it, whether it's we kind of finagle our ways and do like things that, you know, get us way through some of the challenges or kind of cut corners and shortcuts. I think that the answer is that will make you feel genuinely as a conscience that will make you feel good or at least sleep better at night then do those. I know sometimes that's a longer route. But I learned that to be honest and that I would not give away for anything like I would just because that's an to me, that's peace of mind. I'm not trying to talk about the company that I started to but that's I gotta Welcome to Yeah, it's, it's important to be honest. And because when we have our own, not just mental but physical as well. Wellness. I think to me, that's one of the wealth and wealth, it's always consumed as $1 amount here, not just here in the US, but in third world. But there are different components of wealth. And I think one of them is financial got it. But your physical and mental health are part of your wealth as well. And I think that's a key step, not everything is about dollar amounts, things that will stress you out, should be considered, and then you're eating away from your own happiness or kind of, you know, sanity, if you will. And those are the things that we should all consider anything. Yeah, as a call to action, I would ask them to think about other things that are will make them wealthy, whether it will make them more self aware. So they can ponder about meaning of life a little bit more. Because there are stages, right? You don't just wake up one day, oh, my God, what's the meaning of my life, if you're going through struggles of every single thing is like, there is no stop. You're in this kind of hamster wheel. Most likely, you're not going to think about those. When you have a moment to pause and kind of reflect on things in life. That's where you start to design or redesign your life in a way that you want it to be more meaningful to you. And and I think, yeah, people, they can realize that I think there'll be a huge, huge winning, so that will be my

Jason Frazell:

Yeah, early here that I love that. What I hear and that is the more mindfulness, which would make a lot of sense based on what I know that you're what you do and what the company does. And you know, we'll talk more about this. But it makes a lot of sense as being mindful. And it's also interesting. Just thinking about that. And, you know, I live in New York City. So I have friends who work in finance, that doesn't seem to be much of a thing, like the mindfulness and I think it's becoming more of it. But my guess is when you were on Wall Street, there was not a whole lot of like conscious thought behind you're very reactive, you're like, what's, what's going on today? Here's the numbers. How do I make the next buck. And we're actually to talk more about why if you'd like to share, we're going to talk more about this after the commercial break, which we're gonna go to right now. We'll be right back after this.

Unknown:

The talking to cool people podcast is brought to you by Jason for sell coaching. Jason works with amazing people who are looking to find and develop their passion and purpose and create their journey to wherever it is they want to go. Check us out at Jason frazell.com, Facebook or on Instagram. Jason loves hearing from anyone who thinks it would be cool to connect, to be coached, or to be a guest on our show. email him at podcast at Jason frazell.com. Or DM him on Facebook and Instagram. And now, back to some more amazing conversation on talking to cool people.

Jason Frazell:

Alright, Eris, we're back. Yay. Now you get the nice, broad curiosity based open ended question, which is sounds like it's right in your wheelhouse, too. I love these kinds of questions. So what else do you want? Me and everybody listening to know about you?

Aras Toker:

You know, more than about just myself. And I would describe myself a little bit more as a curious person, and so passionate person about understanding the effects of mind and body and, and how they interact together? And also, how do you actually in a workplace context, and because we spend a third of our lives, let's say, eight hours, and there are different times that you can do more, obviously, but

Jason Frazell:

I don't want to pause you for a minute. On a pause you for a minute. You just said eight hours. Yes. Who do you know who only works eight hours a day? Maybe you now?

Aras Toker:

Know, not a lot of people and that's true. Unfortunately. That is true. And? And yeah, it's I have nothing to say because it's absolutely right. Yeah. But actually someday, maybe we maybe one day, maybe in Europe, maybe it's different countries. Yeah,

Jason Frazell:

there you got.

Aras Toker:

I think it's interesting, Jason, that, you know, when we dig really deep with my co founder, Antonella, about this idea that in workplaces, why are people burnout and I think, you know, if you look at the specific science behind it, you hear about unmanageable workloads, the bad relationship between the manager and an employee and all these stem from a not like, the system is gonna, it's not sustainable for people to be kind of in that in a meaningful or a kind of healthy, healthy way, right? So we're kind of grinding and getting more out of people. And, and there's difference between like grit and try to, like get things done the attitudes and, and kind of pushing people to their limit. And in this in the sense of productivity, you know, Jason can take more, okay, I'm gonna ask him more. So you can do 18 hours instead of eight or 10. So, and we will eventually burn out unless we actually create systems in place, I got really curious about that piece that the current system that we're in, especially in the US is not sustainable, we will burn out at one point. And there's an amazing Gallup survey, about 2000 employees, 78% of them said that they've experienced burnout, and at some stage, either once or twice or can more common. And just to hear that, it's just crazy, because burnout is doesn't happen overnight. It's not like, you know, tonight, I'm gonna get burnout. So it's a gradual thing. You see, people have been going through stress, and not just minor stresses, right. So they've been feeling that all one for a long period of time, that it manifested into this kind of phenomenon now, and then they'll just, you know, give up, or just their life kind of completely collapses for that period of time after the burnout. Now, what do we do in this society that we can actually do? Again, coming back to my small dents, philosophy? What do I do? Or what do we do as a company that could make those small dents that will improve the culture a tad bit more, or create more, a little bit more stomach changes that will make the employees realize, Hey, guys, we got to protect our free time, our sleep, our movement, we get to move our body? Like these are things perhaps, intuitively, you know, like, okay, yes, I should move the body, I should eat healthy, but we don't, because the context is naturally created. And, and a lot of times, we're left alone, meaning, all right, Jason Rs, go to go to the staff do meditation, do yoga, it'll be really good for you, you want to burn out, it doesn't work that way. Because if you're in that burnout state, let's be honest, and you know, just just because you did a meditation for 10 minutes, you're not going to feel better, it's more of a gradual thing, if you've been doing meditating. And then you have other things, you know, approaches more holistically, then you have could have systems in place, essentially, that will actually yield a life that will avoid, like this major stressors and, and also burnout. So that's what we got really curious about. And I feel like, it's a very, very difficult behavior change, whether it's the individual employees, or the employers, or the team leaders to kind of embark on these kinds of changes, but at least we're trying to make it as practical as possible for people to see, like, look at each other, hey, I'm not the only person burned out. Let's collaborate on this and then see, collectively, if we can get out of it. I think that's a key step, as opposed to individual. So I think that's what we're going after a peace of mind anyways.

Jason Frazell:

Oh, that yeah, I'm gonna. We're gonna talk a little bit more about this before we wrap today, because I do want to, I want to talk about what you all do there. And I'm very excited for this next part of the show is fellow curiosity person. Right? And when we we've spent a little bit of time together, but not that much. You don't know a lot about me. I'm so curious what you want to ask me that I can answer for you. And for everybody listening. So what? What's the question you have for me? And I'm buckling up? I think it's going to be I think it's going to be a doozy. No pressure, but

Aras Toker:

no pressure. I'm really curious again, actually not knowing somebody like remember, we talked about this? It's actually I'm curious and my mind is already going. I'm really curious about your relationship with your kid in a way that things that will make that kid like the bond between you and it wasn't a he I forgot it was.

Jason Frazell:

We have two we actually have a six year old daughter and a almost two year old son.

Aras Toker:

Yeah, so we alternate remember? Okay, so two kids. So let's look at both of them. Your relation with them? How do you how do you what do you do that will make that relationship stronger? And you feel that there is that father, daughter, Father, Son, kind of connection with? I know it's tough. That is

Jason Frazell:

a good that's a doozy. That's a good one. So I heard you ask it as what am I going to do going forward? Or what are we doing now? What

Aras Toker:

you've been doing, I guess that we're doing that

Jason Frazell:

holistically? Yeah, with? Well, it's interesting. I know you're a father of young young child as well. So you'll go through this and you're supposed to write two and a half to an hour. Yes, it was two and a half. So So with the six year old, she's pretty good at expressing her needs. And I'm pretty clear on what she likes doing now. So I really try to with her, when we get debt, we call it daddy time, which is at this age is very sweet. And feel like it's not always going to be this way as you enjoy it now. People listening to have teenage daughters are like what I try to do is a combination of things that I know we liked doing together while also introducing her to new things. And figuring out what it is that really gets her excited. And we're still in the phase of her life where just kind of doing stuff together still really excites her. I'm excited for you and your your partner and experiences too, because it's just this age. So that's the thing is like being intentional about hey, like, do you want to go and work, I'll just tell you straight up. We're watching the prehistoric planet show on Apple TV, apple plus, which is phenomenal. She loves dinosaurs. So I'm like, Hey, like, let's watch this new show together. And it's, it's unbelievable. And so introduce her to new things like that. And also, when I sense that she's bored, not trying to force it on her. Because I just sucks as a kid. I mean, I don't remember having a lot of stuff forced me but I know parents had forced upon their kin, their you get a board. And my daughter is obviously a she's my wife and I together and my wife and I both get bored very easily. I'm like, it's highly likely our two kids are going to be like that. So with a daughter, that's what we do with a son. I've the specific thing I've been doing with him is introducing him to my music. Like I play guitar, and I'm a big music person. So I have I like a very eccentric types of music and listening to music with him. And he loves to dance, I'm found out which is funny, because I don't love to dance. I mean, I can be persuaded but just with him, it's like introducing him to like music. And yeah, introducing him. I'm a big movement person as well introducing him to being outside a lot. I like being outside. So like just introducing him to those things. And it's, it's interesting. And you've seen this as a father of a, you know, two and a half year old as you can kind of start to tell what resonates. So now our son does not want to be inside. He wants to be outside all the time. Oh, my God. He wants to listen to music all the time. And I think that's not just because he I mean, there is definitely an element of like, Oh, Daddy likes it. But there's also an element of like, oh, he just actually likes these things. And it started to resonate. So that's what I do is I, you know, the older ones just to summarize, a combination of, hey, I know you like doing this. And I'm going to introduce you to new things. And when the little guy just like, here's some cool stuff we can do together. And so far, it's been great.

Aras Toker:

I love it. I love it. And I got a cool question. Yeah, I mean, I wanted to get outside of the kind of the coaching and like things that you do. My mind went there directly. I'm like, I'm actually curious about his, the way how, what not only What kind of father you are, but then also, specifically what you're doing. So that thanks for great question.

Jason Frazell:

Thank you, hopefully, but also, it's free. It's free learnings from you as a father who does not have a six year old. Yeah, there you go. You know what, I'm glad to have you back on your in 10 years. And it'll be like, you're like, what do you do? And I'm like, I try to avoid them at all costs. Like, like, they're annoyed by me. I'm annoyed by them. We give hugs. And we That's it. I'm being facetious. I hope it doesn't come to that. But I guess that's, that's one of the things for anybody who is a parent listening, you just actually don't know. As they start to grow, and they start to become their own, like, opinionated, human, like you don't know, they might, quite frankly be complete assholes, and they might be so good. And like, that's, you know, going back to what you said about the meaning of life is like doing our my wife and I doing our best with just doing the best we can with what we know how to do. And when I was you know, I don't know your experience with parenting. But I find it interesting because you can't really read a book about it. I mean, you can read books, when they're babies what how to keep them alive, but like they become like, you know, two and a half. Your little dude has all sorts of opinions now is my guess. And all sorts of things he likes he doesn't like and it's like, nobody told us how to do this. And we just figure it out.

Aras Toker:

Yeah, I think doesn't necessarily work. A playback clip.

Jason Frazell:

Yeah, even though there's been 100 billion of these things that have happened over human history. Still coming games. Great question. I love that. Thanks, Iris. All right, both I'm scared I'm scared to stay in the hot seat. So I'm gonna take the microphone back the hosting microphone. I feel like you might you might really get me here. I'll come on your podcast sometime if you ever I don't know if you have one actually. But yeah, we met we were thinking about maybe cool. Yeah, like to come on and you can you can grill me. So what are you passionate about?

Aras Toker:

I'm really passionate about health and well being. And I believe that's because that's a kind of fundamental thing. If both mentally and physically we are, well, we're better decision makers were better parents were better. People in general, we're more mindful, we're more empathetic. We and, and if you're not a lot of the challenges that we face in why people sometimes get angry quickly, or just kind of like had an outburst of emotions, that doesn't mean that's bad, but you know, negatively impacting the other person across. And if she kind of, in a kind of balanced place and life, mind, yes, mindfulness is a big part of it, but also physically taking care of the body, eating great food and sleeping. And these are so fundamental that I realized, again, as a person, a 22 year old, living their crazy life in New York, and I from New York, so I actually was this crazy guy that will go out on a Sunday night. And come in from that, to a life that is just again, being mindful, and also a little bit more self aware, I wouldn't call myself, you know, super kind of worried about everything around me. But I just had this training to be having that growth mindset is, is important. But yeah, I think I'm passionate about how to actually implement that not only in me, but instill in other people. Again, the biggest value that we can give to other people, is whatever skill sets that we gained over the life, for whatever reason that we learn that skill set, how do we actually effectively share it or and allow the other person to kind of experience that not impose on them not to kind of force it, but can they be influenced and inspired some of the things that you're doing? And that's what I think I'm very passionate about, whether it's like helping kids kind of talk about these again, I don't need to preach, it's more about like conversation, or observation that they're having, what I kind of how I perceive life, but also like one of the things that I'm doing in my life. And and that's, I think, super, super interesting. And I'm really passionate about that. And it doesn't have to be a monetary gain out of this. Yes, we're trying to do things on the startup and try to see if we can make an impact on the workforce. But as an individual, that gets me really passionate.

Jason Frazell:

Your investors are listening going? No, though. There needs to be a financial gain here. Let's be very clear. Love what you're doing? Yes. And, yes. Which is the cool part about what's cool part about startups, they can really be yes, and absolutely, yes. And make a good living make an impact. Super cool. What's the thing you're most proud of?

Aras Toker:

My son? Yeah, I mean, it's just the most meaningful thing. Again, I'm very happy with my wife too, from the perspective of what we what we build together. But to be able to have human being that is half your DNA is a crazy concept. Again, I'm fairly new compared to you. But it just something makes me proud. It was a little thing. It doesn't have to be just good. Just things that he does. Very fascinating. That makes me proud.

Jason Frazell:

Nice. Let's say that he was listening to this 20 years from now, which if he was that would be really impressive. Your Pocket? Well, or even this, and he's like, Hey, you didn't you're like, Hey, I was on a podcast. What would you what do you want him to know? 20 years from now that you can tell him right now. We're putting this out into the interwebs for? Well, for all I was gonna say for all eternity or Intel, I pull it down at the podcast platform, which I hope never happens. But God who knows the podcasts are gonna be a thing. 20 years from now. So yeah, who knows? Yeah, what do you want him to know?

Aras Toker:

I want him to know that he shouldn't be scared about meeting people. Again, I come back to that is so many things happened to me serendipitously because I met so very interesting people that helped me to to get to where I am right now. Not because it's any status or anything. It just like makes me continue my life. So we all need each other as my point and I think he yeah, I hope he understands that or as he grows up and kind of realized the importance of that. I think one of the key steps is to be able to my in grad school, my teacher had this crazy comment he said that. Get out of your noggin. Your Comfort Zone I think, find things that will get you out of comfort zone. And, and again, that's sounds counterintuitive like because naturally we want to be in the comfort zone. So it's literally set comfort zone is your enemy. I think the earlier you start on that is better, I think I would love him to see or understand and realize that the cool stuff in life is actually a little bit outside of the comfort zone. And at least peeking around and just kind of pushing ourselves.

Jason Frazell:

Yeah, yeah, just offer one thing here. There's a coaching tool. And one of the tag lines of that tool. It's not a tagline. But it's one thing is like, the unknown is where possibility lies. Because otherwise, like what we know is what's possible for us, like, oh, I work in, in finance or working in sales. I know it's possible to sell some of these products and make some good money. And what's unknown as possible. But it is scary. You know, like we're, you know, I'm an on set or myself, an entrepreneur, you're definitely an entrepreneur, it's I've never heard an entrepreneur be like, hey, it was never scary. It was always just really easy. And I was, you know, from day one of starting this company and not having a paycheck. It was really in my comfort zone, like by definition becomes a Yeah. becomes a thing.

Aras Toker:

And Bureau being okay with that as difficult as unnatural as it feels like is Yeah, is I think the recipe man right there. Yeah. Yeah.

Jason Frazell:

I love that. So Eris, as we start to hit head towards the virtual exit, I want to ask you next, if you are present to something that, that you're or what's something that you were afraid that might be true about you?

Aras Toker:

I'm very impatient. And so I say that and people say that outside. But I feel like I always defend like, No, I want to get things done. It's like, you know, I wanted to happen even yesterday, right. But what I'm afraid is, it's it's actually it's actually stemming from some of my own, I guess, I don't know if it's an insecurity or like, having something right away, as opposed to have that pause. To let things kind of simmer. I don't want to go through those emotions and wanted like an answer quickly. I think that's what it is. And that's like that. Because sometimes, like, the good things happen, actually, that wait time, whatever you're waiting for, but I, I need to train myself. It's almost another skill that I will need to learn. Okay. Pause, man. Come on. Relax. Yeah, it's out of your hand right now. Just wait. So I have to kind of say this, but it doesn't come natural to me because I want an answer when that thing immediately. So yeah, it's a strange skill. I don't know if you'll ever learn but it's true.

Jason Frazell:

Yeah, no, I'm smiling. People can't see us smiling. I'm smiling. Because one that that's exactly how I operate to I'm very impatient. And the second part of this question, is hilarious. Because I think we already know from knowing you is like, what do you do to compensate for it? You're like, well, I run a mindfulness and well being company. What I thought, so good. Get outside of it. Yeah, like, I've shared this a few times. This question is always funny. Do you ever seen Batman Begins the first Christopher Nolan Batman film? And I guess this is from the comic books, but it's like the reason he's actually Batman is because he fell down. Uh, well, and the thing he was most scared of was like, there was like, hundreds of bats. And it was the thing that scared him the most. So he like became the thing. You're like, I'm really impatient. So now I teach people about mindfulness and ease and peace.

Aras Toker:

Yeah, it's it's probably, I mean, I told you that it's actually it is stemming from my personal challenges of health. And about Yeah, manifested into the mental side. And yes, we're going after the workplace right now. But that doesn't mean the product can only be in the workplace individuals can use this to, but essentially, what we thought and I really thought to the patients, yes, that's part but sometimes doing things together with other people is not only more fun, but also keeps you accountable, gets you a different perspective. And I think when it comes to wellness, and overall well being, it's, it's a lot more interesting, especially if you're embarking on a bigger behavior change or like habits, forming changes, having an accountability partner doing things in small groups, and having a coach like facilitating conversations and prompts and these are all, we're seeing the benefits on it, whether it's an engagement or overall behavior changes, or people's overall resilience, we can measure those in our program too. But essentially, that's, I think, what what's different about what we're doing to very much human centered, whether it's in small groups, or, or the coach, but in a nutshell, I guess we didn't really talk to the, the what we do, and listeners may be curious about this too. So yeah, thinking about peace of mind as a, as a tool in a toolkit for managers or business leaders, where they can actually offer this six week resilience coaching program, for their employees, to be able to make them more resilient and reduce their burnout. And we have specific ways of assessing and measuring what that is how much of an impact we can do, increasing resilience and reducing burnout. But also we can actually change their overall feeling and also how they, how they perceive the burnout. So this was actually the program is very much designed towards gaining specific practical and resilience building skills that they can implement in their lives. And we kind of handhold them, as well as you put them in a small group that allows them to actually do this with their colleagues. And it's a lot more fun and interesting, also creates that experiential learning that you wouldn't have on a single United app with by yourself watching a video. So

Jason Frazell:

Right. Yeah, and, you know, when we, when we first met a few weeks ago, your co founder is a doctor, this is all science, this is all very scientifically valid. And the thing that I really liked when we talked about the business, and we didn't connect just about the business, but we I was just asking you, you know, kind of what you all do there. What an easy ROI, especially in, you know, in a in a tough job market to find good people, what has people leave jobs, because they're burnt out. And like you said, sometimes because of the manager sometimes because of the role. And, you know, being somebody who worked in sales, sales at the end of the quarter, that's burnout Central, especially when I worked in like big enterprise deals where people always buy the last week of the quarter and you know, your work over Christmas, and all these things like, it's just out there. And, and having I don't think I ever had any was given any tools to deal with any of that other than you just kind of got to do it. And to me, the number one way to burn yourself out is to just kind of do it. Exact, there's no mindfulness there, right. It's like all like pure heads down focus, which is great. And then you collapse. Because

Aras Toker:

you're absolutely right. It's more of a, it's not about grid anymore. It's about the energy that you have, you're depleting, you're not replacing, replenishing that energy. So if anything, your decision making is going to suffer if you're not protecting the sleep. There's all the sciences, you mentioned about Dr. anthranilic. She has a naturopathic background very much looks at this holistically. And I love that because we are not we're definitely using the science to be able to bring these forward in a meaningful way, the way that she designed it. But none of them are like revolutionary in the sense that we know these mindfulness works, meditation, all the stuff are actually working, but the way we bring it together, again, bring the human element is a key step. But yeah, not doing anything. inaction is the biggest thing against burnout. Because the way again, the system is set up is not sustainable.

Jason Frazell:

Yeah, well, that was we start to wrap up here today. How can people connect with you connect to the company, find, you know, find it and all these that are gonna go in the show notes as well. So like, what's a good way for people to learn more about you what you're up to maybe see some, I don't know, some cute pictures of your kid, find out about peace of mind

Aras Toker:

to connect, we're very active on LinkedIn, highly recommend for them to check out peace of mind, our LinkedIn page. And also we have for people that are curious about the program itself. It's a six week program, we've been focusing on offering these teams a minimum of eight to 10 people. But individuals if people want to themselves go through our resilience training program, we were opening them up on September. And right after Labor Day, we'll get specific on the dates, but on our websites, peace of mind that us will be the website for people to go, but they love them to kind of sign up. And it's actually going to be really interesting. Think about going through a six week program only commitments probably hour and a half total a week, and you'll gain so many specific skills. And then you'll be able to experience that with other like minded people that are trying to better their lives, but also do things that actually kind of create some of those habits that we talked to out. So definitely LinkedIn page is great. We're active on Instagram too. But I highly recommend LinkedIn as well as, as well as checking out websites to to get more details about the program. Summers and above. Probably see me a little bit more. Again, LinkedIn is probably the best way to get more

Jason Frazell:

LinkedIn. LinkedIn is the place. Yes. So good to have you on my friend. I'm so glad we made this happen. So glad you got a chance to connect and the tradition on the show for all my listeners, they always know I always ask for a guest to leave us with some sweet short words of wisdom. And I will say, most of my guests pay attention to the short not all and then I just have to I just have to do a little cutting of you know, take it to the cutting floor. It's in the recording and then I cut it for that. But we are what do you have for us? Something that the listeners can walk away with? Little post it note. Little post it note? Yeah, exactly. For those for those young listeners, that's a piece of paper with a little bit of kind of stickiness, but not like funny thing about posting notes. I just have to say being from Minnesota, that's a three M which is a Minnesota based company, the product that I posted notes were a mistake. So this is like my random trivia piece for anybody listening. Wow, the glue that's on the back of post it notes was a mistake. And I think the person who invented it was like, you know, like a lot of these best inventions in the world. And they're just mistakes. And he's like, wow, this stays sticky, but doesn't get too sticky and doesn't leave a residue on the thing they leave it on. And now you got a multibillion dollar business

Aras Toker:

Ubik that will allow you to continue exactly.

Jason Frazell:

Amazing and and trademarked

Aras Toker:

trademark. Wonderful. So what will go on that post it note? I guess to summarize what we talked about today. Leave the world a tad bit better than you began rounding my that'd be my little message.

Jason Frazell:

Awesome. Thank you so much for being on. Best of luck to you the rest of the peace of mind team. I know you're doing great things in the world. Best of luck to you or not even the best of luck. Just best good vibes good energy. I am not a soccer fan. I'm an NFL fan. So Liverpool sounds great, because I don't really care. I don't have a team. If you were a 40 Niners fan, I would say you beat us in the playoffs two years ago, so but I still like you anyway, because I was a big Joe Montana fan growing up and yeah, we'll have to have you have you come back on again sometime soon. And catch us up on everything that's new with you. Thank you, man. Big NFL. Thanks so much.

Aras Toker:

I love I love sports in general, but just to one of the thank you really I really enjoyed this conversation. Excellent. No have the our past actually to be honest. And there you go. Really enjoyed it. Thank you, man. Great. Thanks, Eric. had this conversation. Thank you. Cheers.

Unknown:

Thanks for listening to another episode of talking to cool people with Jason for Zell. If you enjoyed today's episode, please tell your friends. Follow us on Instagram and Facebook and give us a shout out or take a moment to leave a review on iTunes. If something from today's episode pique your interest and you'd like to connect, email us at podcast at Jason for zell.com. We love hearing from our listeners because you're cool people too.