Talking to Cool People w/ Jason Frazell

Alex Terranova - The Anti Excuses Coach on the Costs of Cool

July 20, 2022 Season 3 Episode 27
Talking to Cool People w/ Jason Frazell
Alex Terranova - The Anti Excuses Coach on the Costs of Cool
Show Notes Transcript

Alex shares how a Lego set created a big law enforcement challenge for him, the dangers of always trying to be "cool," and Alex shares with Jason and the audience what it's like to be a reality show villain by design.

"Keep doing what you are doing and you'll get there."

Alex Terranova is a Performance Alchemist who was dubbed “The Anti-Excuses Coach” by Yahoo Finance.  He is the co-creator of Your Love Adventure, a wild adventurous new take on dating, the docile tones behind many popular podcasts, a sometimes model, wanna-be Yogi Guru, and Poet. Legend has it he's fortified with strength from a plant-based diet and was once a Reality Show Villian. Alex Terranova is a raw, bold, magnetic, playful, and spiritual Professional Certified Coach. The author of Fictional Authenticity, CoAuthor of the Best Seller Book Redefining Masculinity, and hosts The DreamMason Podcast, The Frequency Shifters Show, & Co-Hosts The Coaching Show Podcast.  In his private practice, he works with men whose achievements and financial successes have not created the rewarding, joyful, and fulfilling life and business they desire.

http://www.theDreamMason.com
@inspirationalalex
https://m.facebook.com/DreamMasonInc
https://www.linkedin.com/alexterranova

Enjoying the podcast? Please tell your friends, give us a shoutout and a follow on social media, and take a moment to leave us a review at https://lovethepodcast.com/talkingtocoolpeople.

Find the show at all of the cool spots below.

Website

Facebook

Instagram

If something from this or any episode has sparked your interest and you’d like to connect about it, please email us at podcast@jasonfrazell.com. We love hearing from our listeners!

If you are interested in being a guest on the show, please visit jasonfrazell.com/podcasts.

Find the show at all of the cool spots below and find us at jasonfrazell.com/podcasts.

Facebook

Instagram

Jason Frazell:

My guest on the show today is the Amazing Alex Terra Nova Alex Terra Nova. One of my favorite ways to summarize somebody already. You're an anti excuses. Coach is one of the things you coach on is anti excuses. I love that. You're an author. You're a longtime podcast, or you are a baseball cap collector, and rumored which we are definitely gonna dig in on a rumored reality TV villain. How's that for a cliffhanger for the audience? What does that mean? So Alex, thanks for being here today. How are you? I'm good, man. Thanks for having me. That's it's probably the first time somebody's ever thrown in the hat and the reality show villain at the same time. So you just pay me the royalties when that gets you to the next level. This is this is the best part of the show. And it all goes down here downhill for me. So Alex, you're coming in to us from California?

Alex Terranova:

Yeah, Sandy is technically in Carlsbad. Which if people aren't familiar to our leg, the home of Lego Land? Amazing. So you know, if you have kids, probably for you know, for me, that's not that exciting. They live near Lego Land. But I am like 30 miles north of downtown San Diego.

Jason Frazell:

What if you love Legos like I do as an adult?

Alex Terranova:

Do you so I have a mazing layout, I have an amazing Lego story that there were there was a murder and detectives involved in.

Jason Frazell:

So let's kick off the podcast with a Lego murder story. I'm in I'm here for it.

Alex Terranova:

This so this is I'm laughing and it's actually not so in my 20s I think I was 2526. At the time I was managing bars. And my girlfriend at the time was like a waitress. And we I don't remember when you're managing bars, you're she's a waitress, you got a lot of free time, right? We got a lot of fruits, our work doesn't come home with us. And one day we're at my parents house, we open up this closet and we find all my Legos from when I was a kid me and my brother's Legos, there's bins of them. And she you know, we were very, like it was a very youthful kind of relationship we had. And so we took all the Legos and we bring them back to my apartment. And I have this apartment in LA at the time that the living room was so big that there was like a space behind the couch that we didn't even know what to do with it. Well, now we knew what to do with it. So we dumped all the Legos on this space. And we start to build, what would you say, ouch.

Jason Frazell:

If you step on him.

Alex Terranova:

Nobody walks there. And we dumped the Legos all out. And we're short. We're like, what do we want to build. And we come up with this idea to build Merville. So every scene in this Lego town is is a murder happening. And some of them, I would probably never reconstruct this there was it was violent and offensive and, you know, not okay in a lot of ways. And we're having a lot of fun, and no one sees this, right? So we build this thing and it sits back there and like something like that would happen. We just leave it there. Well, this is the bummer part of the story. So a little while later, all of a sudden I my roommate at the time, his grandparents were brutally murdered. This is not a joke. This is uh, this really happened. And, you know, obviously all the things that come with that detectives come to our house, you know, they always want to talk to family first, you know, to find out who did it and on a positive note that people who didn't got caught, they got convicted, right, whatnot. But the detectives come to our house one day, and they want to talk to me because they're like, hey, where was your roommate the night of the murders. And I'm sitting there and I'm having this convert very casual conversation with this detective she had never done before. And the other detective is like meandering around the apartment. He's looking at what books we read what you know, video games, we play and looking at everything. And almost all the books on the shelf or John Grisham books, a lot of the scripts because we were both writing at the time we're like, like, actually movie scripts. And then behind the couch, is this murderer Ville Lego village. Oh, my God. And my brain is a step ahead of this detective. And as he turns on, sees and starts to lean in and look at it. I'm like, it's mine. That was that's not my, that's not my roommates. He didn't build that he was. It's like, what are the what are the chances, right, like, what are the odds of that happening? But yeah, you know, we might also see this in a movie one day, because my friend at the time, who is he's actually a very successful writer in Hollywood in the comic book space. And I've been told that he's incorporated that moment into something he's written. So you might say

Jason Frazell:

it's, it sounds like something like true detective or something. But like, if, which is the new season coming out? I will say, Alex, that, you know, I've done about 140 Some episodes now. Definitely never had an opening like this. So it's great.

Alex Terranova:

It's like, if you don't think it's like True Detective meets, like Curb Your Enthusiasm.

Jason Frazell:

Right? Right. Like Brooklyn. 911 Or like Brooklyn, Brooklyn, nine, nine. Yeah. All right, like Curb Your Enthusiasm or it's like doo doo dee doo. Oh, wait, why is there a bunch of murder scenes behind the couch Legos? Well, this is a great way for me to ask you the next question, which is what's something you nerd out about? And I think we've already covered creating murder scenes of Legos. So I guess at this point, we can just move right along, because that's probably the only thing you nerd out about, isn't it?

Alex Terranova:

I think I nerd. You know, I think I nerd out about baseball hats. Yeah. And I think I actually, and it's not as bad as it used to be. And I'm really getting reflected from my girlfriend. She points out a lot. My mind is, it's really hard for me to be present on one thing, like podcasting, doing this is a little easier because I'm right. I'm getting to interact. I'm getting the questions. But it's really hard. If you and I were just sitting at a table having a conversation, it's really hard for me just to be my mind is like being Mee Mee Mee Mee Mee like just all over the place thinking about a million things. And I notice things that are wrong everywhere. Like, I'll notice what we're driving by. And I'm like, well, here's one of the light bulbs out in that movie theaters mate and like, sign over, you know, over there. And notice these because my mind is just it's constantly noticing things and constantly wondering. And I never realized that until I was with her where she's like, you're, you're the only person I've ever met that were driving down the street. And you'll be like, Oh, wonder why they put mailboxes right on the edge where you can hit them with a baseball bat. Right? She's like, who thinks about who thinks about these things? And I think like, I kind of nerd out on noticing all these weird things and decisions we've made about our world in our society that no one else is paying attention to.

Jason Frazell:

Yeah, that's, that's really cool skill you'd have made for a great detective. I'm sure you've heard this before.

Alex Terranova:

No, I don't. You know, I don't I think that maybe I don't know enough about Texas. I feel like, well, I'm really good at escape rooms. So maybe,

Jason Frazell:

but like, but the idea of noticing just noticing details about our or that or a spy like people that like can walk, you know, seeing us in movies and television shows where like a CIA agent will walk into a room and be like, hey, like that guy over there is you know, like, and then like, Do you have a good memory?

Alex Terranova:

I don't from like, necessarily, because there's so many things happening. I'll miss some things. But what I do notice I have a good memory as if you and I were to if you dropped you and me in a city, and just were like, wander about I would be able to find our way back from like, Oh, I remember that sign. I remember that bear made out of wood. I remember we walked past that's it's it's it kind of works. Like when it connects with things like that. Yeah,

Jason Frazell:

that's a really cool skill. And relating to your girlfriend. It'd be really nice. She's like, Babe, I don't want to hear any more skepticism and criticism about the world just be quiet. Yeah,

Alex Terranova:

or just random things you notice? You know, it's like, why is that house set so far back off the street? Why wouldn't they move? Why wouldn't they built it forward and have more backyard? She's like, who's thinking about this as you just want? Like,

Jason Frazell:

I don't do it on purpose. Yeah, it's just just part of who you are. Alright, let's talk about. Let's talk about something that's inside of your comfort zone that you know, is outside of somebody else's. So we talked a little bit about some of the things you do you do coaching work, which by definition means you've likely grown this over time, you've written book, your podcast, you're not afraid of getting out there, at least I would assert you're not. You've been on a reality TV show, which we're going to get into later. So we know that that's not something that you're unwilling to do. So yeah. Like, what's something that you just you love? You dig on? You'd like to do it? And you know, other people are like, Absolutely not? As not for me.

Alex Terranova:

I think you touched on a lot of the things but I think the piece that would make me different is that I'm willing to share unfinished, untested creativity. Before like, you know, sometimes writers will like I'm not sharing my work until it's done. No, I'll share it like five minutes in. And I'm very, like, it might hurt. If you give me you're like, that's terrible. You need to redo that. But there's something about the creative process that I actually feel good. Like, I like the energy of putting it out there. So I will throw ideas, creative things, things I'm working on out to the world or to my partner, whoever and I think a lot of creatives don't do that. They really want things to be polished and ready before they present them. And I think it's because they can't be with It's uncomfortable to be with what you get back and actually love what you get back. I think it actually helps me further the idea.

Jason Frazell:

Yeah, you reminded me of a conversation I had with somebody last I think it was last month and there was like a team building thing. We were talking about our superpowers and I I said that and it sounds like you and I have the same thing I said one of my superpowers is I'm not afraid to take risks. And it also doesn't need to be perfect. Yeah. So I'm willing to just get out and like do it and try and improvise and iterate. And I enjoy that process. Which, what people told me they're like, Wow, that's a that is a real superpower. Because usually either you get one of the one or the other, but not both sounds like you're similar to, and I'm not a writer. I'm not, I'm not. So I don't like writing. I do speaking, and I do like podcasting. But that's a really cool thing. Because my experience was like coaching people in the creative space or a lot of friends. It really is, there's a lot of, I'm gonna label it as perfectionism of like, oh, we can't possibly show this thing to the world until it's like 99% of the way there. And what happens sometimes is then that what you think is great actually stinks. Totally, as opposed to getting that iterative feedback throughout.

Alex Terranova:

It's also, it's, I think, it's also how I do relationships. I don't really want to sit down and just talk like fluff. Like, if you and I were hanging out, I don't I don't want to, I'd rather be like, hey, read this thing that I wrote, or I think there's a there's more intimacy and depth often in sharing things like that than us just being like, Hey, do you see that game last night? Or what's going on this week? And I'm like, I don't walk around with things I'm writing, like, sharing them. You know, if you and I went to lunch, I would just like, make you read something I'm working on. But if it if it came up, and you were like, oh, that sounds cool. I might be like, do you want to read it? Like, yeah, you know, and I think there's also something that is, I think this took a long time. If you give me bad feedback, you just helped me improve. If you give me good feedback, it's actually exciting. And I want to put more energy into it. So I kind of win either way. And I think that definitely, like pulls me forward. I also then get to hear your idea right to get free, free brainstorming from people that might be able to give you gold that other people are, you know, you're doing it in isolation, and you miss what you or I or anyone else might have to offer them.

Jason Frazell:

Yeah, um, we're gonna move along in a second. But I do want to, is this a newer? Is it something you've grown into, because what you're talking about is not people's usual pattern for feedback. Most people I know, that is not their pattern of feedback.

Alex Terranova:

So it's hard. I think it depends in areas that I felt confident in when I was younger, I think I was okay with that. When I was in the restaurant business, I would come up with food concepts, string concepts, concepts, menu concepts, things like that. And I would share them with people that were close to me, because I felt really confident in that area, my life. Now writing. Let's just say anything outside of that, I would have said the opposite, I would have been really hesitant because, I mean, I remember being a kid, and when I would turn in a paper, you know anything for school, it would come back and it looked like the teacher slit their wrists, and just bled red ink all over it. And my confidence in my ability to communicate and write and those kinds of things in school, like educational, systematic kind of things, but a really low confidence, and I struggled with reading and writing. And so when I wrote my book, it was actually a huge breakthrough, to be able to have an editor, like give me feedback, and not interpret the feedback, as I'm a big idiot who shouldn't be writing a book, to really see that their job is to help me. And as the writer, my job isn't to be the best editor. You know, that's their two different jobs.

Jason Frazell:

It's two different jobs. It's why writers have editors, and why editors aren't usually writers. They're not you don't need a part.

Alex Terranova:

I will say, I want to add this to in the world we live in, it does create a challenge because of social media things happening really fast, right? And I'm not a good editor. My strength is not grammar, you know, punctuation and syntax. And so that I'll often find myself feeling shame or a little beat up when I write something that I really want to get up on social media, right? I mean, it could be long short, and then somebody that I know will be like, Hey, you got like your sentences aren't, don't make sense, you spell the words wrong. And that used to be a really hard thing to do. Because it was like I can't share in the way I want to share and communicate because the weakness that I have shows up in a way that makes me feel really bad about myself and also doesn't communicate what I'm trying to do. And then I recently found trying to find solutions to this I've like played with the idea of like having somebody like on call that can help me like paying somebody to do that. I recently found Grammarly. I don't know if you know if you're holding Grammarly and oh yes for their like their robust system and now I just write everything in Grammarly and then I copy and paste it out of there which is actually freeing because look, there might still be some mistakes right? It's okay, but they're not to the degree that would would kind of limit my ability to be who I wanted to be in the world.

Jason Frazell:

Oh, do I know Grammarly? It saved my butt for two years. my affiliate link for Grammarly is in the show notes, please go click on it. Maybe we'll get them the spots is up now, Grammarly is a it's a game changer, game changer for me to right now so other side of that what's something you don't like doing that is really uncomfortable for you and you know other people that are like a dig it, let's do it.

Alex Terranova:

There's two and they're so obvious dancing and karaoke. So I'm like I have obviously done both. And so uncomfortable, like so. And look, if I'm in my house and I'm just like dancing, it's fine. But you know, people are always like, no one's paying attention to you. Well, every time I'm hanging out with people, somebody's like, Hey, look at that guy dancing over there. Like

Jason Frazell:

you paid attention to me, your era

Alex Terranova:

at karaoke, and it's like, Oh, who's that guy? That person is terrible. And I'm like, I'm good.

Jason Frazell:

Yeah, people are actually paying attention. All right. So I have a karaoke question for you. Yeah. If if, if we were going to do karaoke right now, which we're not because it's not a karaoke podcast. And I don't think anybody would stay tuned in here based on what you just shared, or listening to me. I'm not a singer, either. If you and I were out with some friends, and we got you either some liquid courage or you just wanted to do it, and you were going to sing a song? Do you have a song that you would be willing to stand up and sing for a group of people?

Alex Terranova:

Are we thinking together? Is it just me by myself?

Jason Frazell:

We could sing together. We could do it together?

Alex Terranova:

I mean, I'm thinking if we did it together, maybe like, I could show you the world from a lot. And you know, we can fight over who plays you know? Now that's young. You don't? Wow, that is that's a choice. No, honestly, I don't. I think this is the thing that I that I don't understand about karaoke that other people get, there's good karaoke songs. And there's songs that you should not be doing karaoke to, unless, right, and for different degrees, some of its based on pace, some of its based on the range of the music. I have noticed, I don't know how to pick a karaoke song. So all I might pick a song based on music I like that you send to in your car that you're seeing with the pace of the artist, you know, it the cadence of the music and the rhythm, and it's different when you're doing karaoke. So I feel like if I had to, and I wanted to, I would probably lean on somebody who's like the who's the expert karaoke person in the group that can do karaoke song to do because, yeah, it just hasn't gone well for me in the past.

Jason Frazell:

Yeah, I can help you out with this a little bit. If you ever do find yourself in this situation is male country music. Most men can generally do an okay job. Even if you don't like it. I'm gonna do a I'm doing a public service announcement for everybody listening. Nobody should be doing Adele, or queen or Whitney or Mariah or these like Michael Jackson. Nobody should be trying to do those karaoke because it's nearly impossible to sound good. I have heard a few times where like Marvin Gaye where people like singing I'm like, it's just so darn perfect as it is that there's no way you're going to it's going to be it's just not gonna go well, but then there's other songs are like, Hey, I'd love to hear it. Like the rousing ones that like you sing in a bar, the people like get up and sing. But some of these songs like they're nobody should ever do these a karaoke. Just period. It just doesn't sound as good. It's never gonna sound good.

Alex Terranova:

I bombed a country song before. And it was mostly because of pacing. Like, it was like, I think it was like a chase rice, or like, you know, more like a poppy country singer. And like, the pace of a song would be like really fast and really slow. And when I was listening to it, it's like, I knew every word of the song, but when you take him out, he was yeah,

Jason Frazell:

it was rough. You are definitely a karaoke rookie. I can tell. Good thing. You know, good thing. We all do different things, and you're not a karaoke person. Alright, so Alex, moving along here to talk a little bit about speaking. So to give you five minutes, let's say that everybody in the world is listening to us on this podcast. You had five minutes to deliver some Alex wisdom, things that you want people to know, a game changers, like your five minute mini TED talk, what would you talk about? And what would be your call to action for us as your audience?

Alex Terranova:

I think it's the thing that has been really prevalent in my life, currently, which is that we have we have the way we set up like goals and results backwards. So if you here let's let's let's look at it through like a sports metaphor. If you and I were on a baseball team, and we win the championship, and that's the goal of the team. But the whole season, we're basically miserable. We hate our have teammates, we're not enjoying playing our body hurts. At the end of that year, when we win that championship, we're gonna get about, we're gonna get a pretty great amount of joy for a moment in time popping those bottles celebrating maybe a parade, and then it's gonna be over. And we're gonna have to start all over again. And we spent that whole season in suffering and misery, like 99% of the time was actually unenjoyable and miserable. So we got the goal, but we got like, 1% of actually enjoyment of the experience. I think that that's a really twisted way that we set up our reality that most of us are like, goal first, what's the thing we want? And then we go all in on that. And we go goal. And we're like, how do we get there? And we forget about what's the experience? What what's the actual journey and the ride gonna feel like? And I think we've we, it would serve us us as human beings to flip it and say, what do we want our journey and experience to be like, right, it could be and we get to make that up. For me a lot of times, it's adventure, it's play, like it's a good time. And then what I noticed is Okay, so now I still have to create what I want. So I want it to feel like this, which is going to be 99% of what I have the experience that I have now at the end of that journey, if I don't get the championship, but I'm like, Man, Jason, that was the most fun team I ever played on. We had a great year, I had such a good time, I might be a little bummed that we didn't get the championship, but I'm gonna look back. And really, I think I'm gonna really embrace it, and I'm probably gonna want to do it again. And I'm gonna have more enthusiasm about doing it. And if we did win the championship, and it's like, it's like, you know, sprinkles on the Sunday, it's already great, and it's an extra. So I would want people to take away that, hey, your experience isn't isn't a result. It's not an output. It's actually the input that drives your life. And at the end of your life, you're gonna look back and you're not going to think about all your the results you got, you're gonna think about what was my journey? Like? Yeah,

Jason Frazell:

like that. Before we go to a commercial break here really quick. I was thinking out loud. Or I'm gonna think out loud to you right now. So people listening, let's say that we have a screenwriter. There's a screenwriter listening to this episode. And their result is they want to get that script picked up, or one of their scripts picked up for it. Let's make it up a reality television show. Sorry, that's unscripted. No, wait, that is scripted, sorry. Whatever it is, doesn't matter. And they're listening. They go, Well, I want to get picked up money, fame and fortune, potentially get to see my craft on this screen. How would you relate something like writing a script? Like the journey of writing a script? And I'm, you know, partially this question is self serving, because I'm not a writer. So I'm really curious your perspective on the creative process, and not being attached to the commercial part of it on the end, or the thing that like, actually, has it come to life? Because I mean, like, how many scripts get picked up? And television film? It's like, like, what? Less than 5%? Something like that?

Alex Terranova:

Yeah, I mean, who knows, I in my 20s, I've written I've actually written probably about 10. Like feature movie scripts, and some like spec scripts for TV. It's great because I didn't know what I was doing. To your to your thing. I was I was bartending, I was managing restaurants. I was living in LA, and one of my roommates was an actor, and one was a director. You know, director, writer, they're both doing one is now a professor at Ohio State teaching the theater. And the other one is, is living out his dream, writing comic books and TV shows and getting paid good money and succeeding. I kind of watched them and was like, Man, this seems like fun. And every day, I would write, and I never, it never actually affected me that big that I didn't sell anything because I wasn't. It was like I was it was this thing that I did for fun that I really enjoyed. And when it started to be like, with my book, when I was like, Oh, I'm gonna write this book, it all became about the result. I couldn't get it written. I couldn't I couldn't get it out. I didn't have the discipline. Because the journey was there was no the process was miserable. That when I let go of, you know what, screw this. It's not about how many copies gets sold. This is like because I want to write a book. Why don't I enjoy this and let my thoughts will all of a sudden it started to pour out of me. And then it's like, now looking back, right? I don't have you know, I haven't sold millions of copies of my book, and I don't care. I had a great time writing it. It exists. It's sitting here on my desk. I love looking at it. It feels really good. And I think ultimately, that's what we can control. Right? We can't control if, you know Fox buys our script, or if we get asked in that role, but we can control the experience that we have. And I think if you create the good experience, you're going to want to write another script or go out for another. Right, you'll create more opportunities.

Jason Frazell:

Yeah, I love that. Thanks for sharing. That's a that really is. That's a real TED Talk topic. Like it's not just about the result, it's about I mean, it's like, the journey destination, a little bit cliched. But the idea that a lot of the things we do, it's so what's the end goal? But like, what's actually the thing that's so enjoyable inside of it? That Alex, we're gonna take a brief commercial break, we'll be right back after this. All right, Alex, we're back. Probably about time I asked you about the reality TV villain. You know, it's it's in your bio. And I know a tiny bit a tiny bit about this. So what's the question I want to ask you? The question is that it's not, it's more of a request. But bordering on demand, tell us about what it means to be a reality TV villain. What does this mean? What is this cryptic thing that we are going to now learn about? And record for? posterity and for the internet for all time? Look, it

Alex Terranova:

exists? You can, you can find me out there. In the reality TV show universe. I wish it was more like the Marvel Universe. But yes,

Jason Frazell:

the link will be in the show notes. Trust me, it'll be there. I will find that.

Alex Terranova:

When I was when I was 28. I was running a bar in Venice Beach. And my girlfriend at the time, same girlfriend who I built this Lego village with would watch Food Network all the time, always on in the background of our house. And I would have my desk set up in a place where it was like, my peripherals I could see I could see and hear, you know, Food Network. And often I would turn and be like, Oh, these people are terrible, right? Like they always just seemed like it was like, it's like Bobby plays not terrible. But Bobby Flay was like Mr. New York, and you had like Guy Fieri, who was kind of like your, you know, your Midwest, racecar driving kind of like they all fit these like stereotypes. Yeah. And some of them I just thought were, like, awful at what they did, and not that entertaining, and so many of the shows on Food Network. And again, this is, you know, 13 years ago, I thought were like pretty terrible shows. And I didn't understand how she watched this. But I was in the restaurant business, and I never thought all that much about it. And as I would listen, I would do it. And I could do this so much better. And it'd be so much more fun. And at the at the time. I also thought, where's the like, you know, there wasn't that kind of cool Rockstar tatted up young guy personality. And so I started to audition for shows. And I would go on all these websites, you know, like Fox and Food Network and find what shows they were doing and I would audition. And I had at the time because I was trying to open my own place. I had some concepts, I had a lot of things I could work with in this world. And I got cast, I had been actually in the running for multiple, like random MTV shows when I was in my 20s that I would keep that I kept like bowing out of I was like, Oh, this isn't gonna be a good look. And I would I would kind of drop out at the last minute. But I got cast on the show called America's next great restaurant. It was done by the people who do Top Chef, but it was like the concept was food entrepreneurs, people that want to have their own restaurant. They don't have to be a chef and build the concept to hire the chef and then Bobby Flay the guy who started Chipotle, Curtis Stone. There was a there was a committee of judges and basically they were going to shark tank for restaurants. Yeah, they were going to invest in the winners restaurant. The first ish episode when we were all filming, there was a guy who was clearly the villain. But he went way off on like, on the on the first episode, which they didn't air he said some like pretty offensive, racist kind of things. And they and they, like booted them off right away. Like it's a good start. Yeah, they were not having it. And he was clearly that, like, the jerk of the show. And I remember when he got booted, thinking, like looking around and going, there's no there's no bad guy here. There's nobody that's gonna like, you know, talk shit and ruffle feathers and poke the bear. And I remember thinking, like, I know how to do this restaurant thing. The challenge of the restaurant thing is my comfort zone. For a lot of these people. They were not restaurant people. So they were really focused and serious. I was like, let's have fun with this. And I really, I wasn't a coach at the time. I wasn't thinking about experience, but I really remember, I'm not gonna get to control who wins this show. But I am gonna get to control the experience I have. And I was like, let's have fun. And the way I decided to have fun was to kind of be a jerk and It was basically like talking a lot of, you know, shit and poking at people and, and playing that game and the friend of ours that told you that or not well, that the friend of ours that we have, she was actually the one that was like, You should put that in your bio. Because I've taken if this was a video podcast, we could share it. But I'm actually taking clips of the show and like, put them together. And so it's like the highlight reel of me being a jerk. Which I think is great, because I've totally transformed my life so much. I'd never made it like that other people now. But it's kind of you know, it's I often say I'm a reformed or recovering asshole. And there's the evidence.

Jason Frazell:

There it is, Alex. And there we are. No more mystery. No more cryptic. No more cryptic references to this thing. Yes, I am going to find something or maybe you can send me something and we will definitely put it in the show notes for those who want to see this. I haven't seen it. So I am definitely gonna watch this is gonna be entertaining for me as well.

Alex Terranova:

Yeah, there's, there's I tried at the time I was trying to make, like a reality career out of didn't work out. Yeah, but you know, there's still time, you know, maybe maybe I'll make you know, make a

Jason Frazell:

reality television star. Yeah, that's, that's what kids is a little kids dream about. I have a question about auditions for reality TV before we move on here. Sure. What do you audition for? It's not like you're going in and reading a script? What are they? I mean, looking at how you look and what how you carry yourself or like, what? Yeah, so what do you do in an audition?

Alex Terranova:

So I've probably done about five or six. But basically, in the way that it was when I had done them was you sit in front of a radio sitting in front of a camera? And they're, they're basically interviewing you, they're like, oh, what's tell us about, you know, if there was a, this is pretty good. When I was in my 20s, I got cast, somebody approached me and was like, hey, we want you to be on this MTV show. The show was called I want to be you. And that the thing was, there was somebody that knew me who was like, I want to be more like Alex, and they told them about me. And then those people came in, recruited me. This door actually went on MTV, I'm so glad I didn't do it. Because I would have looked like, it would have not been a good luck. But when they brought me in, they sat me there. They're like, why would somebody want to be like you? What do you do that is, you know, and I didn't even know who the person was at the time. But they were like, Oh, how do you pick up women? And how do you make money? And they just asked you questions, and they were basically looking to see if you had personality. If you're gonna say kind of wacky or off the wall stuff. Right? Do you how are you going to bring drama? Are you going to be boring? And at that time in my life? Oh, I was. I love to bring the drama. Yeah, some might say I still do. But it's like

Jason Frazell:

at that time of my life and your girlfriends like, in that time, your life. Yeah, exactly. I want to before Yeah, before we I want to hear a little bit more about you. Before we do that. I do want to mention something about myself and my wife, who has been a guest on the show and is coming back here shortly. She was guest number one in season three, one of my top downloaded episodes, so I think that should tell me something that maybe it's time to hand the reins over to her because people are much more interested in listening to her than just me here with other guests. But we have been told so many times that we would be amazing on The Amazing Race because we're both super competitive. And we're very entertaining when we're competitive. And we like to work as a team but we're also just wildly competitive. So we've been told that so if you know anybody at the Amazing Race and CBS wherever that is, you hit you hit me up I think we could do it. Although it'd be a little hard to two young kids and you know to go around the world for however many days they do

Alex Terranova:

if they made you strap the kids to you and you had to do the whole thing with a

Jason Frazell:

yeah with like a one and a half year old with a toddler that would be really fun.

Alex Terranova:

It's also complimentary that they're not you know, saying like you guys should be on Temptation Island Right? Like that's often that show I think me and my partner should be honest like we should go on Temptation Island and see how that goes. I don't think we should do that. I think it'd be a terrible idea.

Jason Frazell:

is funny. Oh, that's so good. Well, what else? Ox maybe five more minutes on you like what else would you like us to know about you? So we know your restaurant tour. You're an entrepreneur and reality TV. Cat collector you live in San Diego now. Wrote and written a book you work with lots of people in your coaching practice like Yeah, what else do you want us to know about

Alex Terranova:

you? So something that I think is really fun that I think that your audience would get a kick out of is something I created this year I guess with my with my girlfriend partner and we created a project and a experience called your love adventure, which I don't know if you know this about me, but it's the way we met. So about a year ago, roughly a year ago, I was pretty you know, I'm following my own advice. Like I was pretty over are dating wasn't like I couldn't find a date or they weren't sometimes good. But I was just like over the process I was over the, the like wasting money on people you didn't have a good time with hanging out with people, you didn't actually enjoy the conversation. Just the whole, the swiping, right, like the whole thing just felt like not enjoyable anymore. And over a couple of drinks with my cousin, we kind of came up with this joking idea of what if I didn't pick who I dated? What if I turned over the reins to my dating life to a few of my friends and let them choose who I dated? Well, this quickly went like kind of vibe, like a little bit of little bit viral. And I created a landing page and women essentially applied to go on a two week trip with me to to loom for a friend's wedding. And five of my friends got to choose who the winner was. And then when I say it went viral is on podcasts. I was actually on the local news in San Diego. Yeah, interviewed about this, Evan won this contest. And, and her and I've been together since and creating a life together. I mean, this is this is who I'm going to be with this. And we you know, as as her mom says, you want your your you want Alex in a contest. And as I often say she she wanted me to contest. But we were at the end of this, we were like, there was something really unique about this, right? We something about how I created it almost unintentionally, really worked. It wasn't an accident. And what we realized what hurt i Evans, also Evan is a very successful dating, and self worth coach for women. So when we looked at this together, and I looked at like, the the pieces about integrity and commitment and experience and authenticity, and she came in from like, why did this work from a dating kind of perspective, we were like, Wait, there's some pillars here that got accidentally created in the formatting the crit the creation, the the way, we set it up having the committee of friends. And this year, we created a program called your loved adventure, which anyone go to your love adventure.com. And we had, we had, we just ran our first beta program, and all three women created an adventure and a trip and men applied. It happened to be women, this time that all signed up to do this project with us. Men applied to have the three women are with the men that that one the they're dating, no one decided like, hey, like she had all these breakthroughs and decided not to move on with the guy. But they did take a trip together. But we recreated dating in a way is like, hey, no swiping. It's like all about intentionality. It's all about the experience you want to have. And then also figuring out, you know, what are the habits, the behaviors, the patterns that are creating your dating life to go the way that it's always gone? Which was the thing that got broken up for me? Kept dating? Yeah, same kinds of people. And when I turned it over to my, like, my community of judges, they picked somebody I would not have picked for myself. Right, Evans great. And I'm so grateful that I'm with her and like, we're so happy. It's the best relationship, but we wouldn't have chosen each other based on habits, behaviors and automatic, you know, like autopilot kind of thinking. Yeah,

Jason Frazell:

that's super cool. I'll put a link in the show notes on that. It's a really interesting concept. Well, a lot of times our friends know more about us than we do when it comes to that, like they see more for us. It's really good. I have to bring this up because I'm a huge Kirby enthusiasm fan. Did you watch this last season? Love it? Yeah. Oh, it's just like the reverse Mary Ferguson.

Alex Terranova:

Dude, this was happening. We were together when Mary Ferguson came out, and I was like, Are you kidding me?

Jason Frazell:

You're like Mary Ferguson. Yeah, yep. People don't know what we're talking about. Go watch season 11 of curb. It's really the best character to so lianza best. Alright, Alex, what would you like to ask me that I can answer for you. And for everybody listening?

Alex Terranova:

Who's the coolest person you've ever talked to?

Jason Frazell:

Oh, man, I cannot do that here live on this show or over in my life.

Alex Terranova:

We're gonna make you. You know, we're going to make you the villain of your own show.

Jason Frazell:

I know you'd made me the villain. Well, I'm going to be a little political here. I'm going to I'm going to actually answer this in a way of what I think the person I've talked to that probably has done the coolest stuff. Hmm. Like if you looked at them externally, like what have they done? Or what do they do? Yeah. And by cool, I think this is probably the most interesting. This is a gentleman named Ray. He's Irish. He also fellow restaurant tour in New York City. But the thing he did last year, and I'm gonna have him back on to give us an update. That I just for me was just fun. fascinating and just you talk about outside of people's comfort zones. He decided he's he's an adventure athlete as well. And he and two other dudes are going to row from New York City to Ireland in a rowboat, oh, a rowboat? This boat had no engine on it. And I just thought that was so it's just so unique. Yeah. Who like what kind of her and we talked about this in the pot. It was from March of 2021. If anybody wants to listen, and when he I asked him I said, What in the world has you want to do this? Is like because I can it sounds like if you ever watched like Alex Honnold, the the free the free climber like free solo, or there's people that just do these things because they can. Yeah, what happened to them? Because they did have electronics and GPS, but just rowing. So they had to train for like six months, these these dudes are crazy. Three dudes. They slept on it. They had solar panels, they had to pack the food, because they were not getting resupplied on the Atlantic Ocean and the Atlantic Ocean, you know, obviously has crazy currents. It has Bart like big ships. Yeah. And what ended up happening is they ended up actually taking on water and getting rescued by a barge about like, I think 25 days into the trip, and it was gonna be like a 60 Someday trip. Oh, they got caught in a storm. And yeah, I just thought that was just such a cool and also like, wildly unique thing. That I was blown away. And I got connected to him through a mutual friend. He's like, Hey, you should talk to my buddy Ray is doing this cool thing. I'm like, What's he doing? He's like, he's like, it's something to do with like a boat. I'm like, alright, and I talked to him. Like, that's not just something to do with the boat that's literally, to me is like Insanity. They all survived. I mean, he, yeah. What are you?

Alex Terranova:

What do you How are you going? What are you going to tell your wife now when that she knows she's not the coolest guests you've had on?

Jason Frazell:

Because my you know, my wife is the coolest in terms of the goal setting and vision that we talked about vision and goal setting. My wife's like a vision and goal setting. Genius. Practical, cool. She would probably agree if knowing my wife, if you listen to that episode. It's really good. But she would probably say yeah, I'm not as cool as rolling across the Atlantic Ocean.

Alex Terranova:

And I don't even know if that sounds cool. I think that sounds like I mean, it's, it's, it's like I have respect for somebody that

Jason Frazell:

Yeah, it's like a whole new level. It's literally like when I was watching the movie free solo. I'm like, yeah, why? Yeah. Like, what is the thing? Yeah. But I mean, the truth of it is Alex, I've just I, the this is the honest truth. I'm not being political. I can't narrow it down to one. I've had so many interesting conversations, so many interesting people where you, you have people than they do, like they're an author, and then you find out things about them. You're like, that's insane. Like, I had somebody on who wrote a speech for President Kennedy. No idea before they came on, or I've you know, people have come on, I've had a couple of military people on my buddy, Steve drum who's been on twice Navy Seal, like you hear. And then we end up talking about dead code concerts for an hour, like not an hour, but like, for 10 minutes. He's done amazing things. And a lot of those things he actually can't talk about, but I just I find that's the whole point of the shows. I find. Everybody does cool stuff. Yeah. You know, even reality TV villains. Very cool. I think that's very cool. I think I could be a good I could be a good villain if I get if I could get over my people pleasing. Yeah, I probably want to be the guy who everybody likes.

Alex Terranova:

Yeah, no, that'd be like, so I feel like that'd be so boring. That's I think like most there were there were those people too. You know, it was though there was the people who were like really helpful. Everybody they wanted, you know, they want everyone to like them. There's the there were the people that were really focused. Everybody really, I think this is actually you know, you and I were talking about this before we record, like I shared with you like the consequences of cool, but we we like to put ourselves in boxes, right? Most people do it unconsciously. Oh, I'm the pretty person. I'm an athlete. I'm the leader. I'm the follow that we don't even know that we're and then we step into the roles that we play. And when I consciously looked at the room and went to try to get the most attention, what role should I play? Right? And I looked at the room and the room was like, Oh, that doesn't look like there's a villain. Villains always get a lot of airtime. That makes sense. Like I should right I was like a very conscious choice. Smart and yeah, and it wasn't always fun. It wasn't always I mean it at times, right people get mad at you like there was there was a guy on the show want to fight me, right and there was not somebody to be fighting. And right name is Bobby Flay. Ya know, like I Chris No Bobby Flay, I would fight Bobby Flay. You'd fight. Yeah, fight Bobby Flay. But this guy was not somebody I wanted to be fighting. Like, I probably wouldn't have gotten well for me. But I, but I stayed in the villain role of like, it was like, Hey, come fight me this like that I win, right? If I'm triggering people to the extent that they want to fight me, I'm actually doing the roll really well and winning, because now I'm in it's almost like Gary Payton, Reggie Miller that like getting in people's heads was kind of how I was playing. And the thing that people didn't even realize was certain if you pick on certain people, it triggers other people. Right? So yeah, I picked on certain people than other people had to like, come and rescue and save. Whereas if I picked on those other people, those other people wouldn't have like, even noticed. So it was like it was it was very strategic. Like I don't know where this kind of part of he came from, but I think into that point, he conniving. Yeah. And even in the, you know, I want I loved this concept of your show, because I'm so attached to like, we as a society think of people as, like, cool is a good thing. And cool look so many different ways. You know, I think like Johnny Depp, Johnny Depp, and, you know, has is somebody who we would think of as cool and that guy's had a lot of problems, like maintaining the image of cool can be really costly. And really expensive. Yeah, serving. And I think you could interchange the word cool with hip or successful or whatever. And often that thing that we that we think is like a good thing to be like, referred to as becomes a trap, and it can look in so many different ways. And I even think in that reality world. That was my way of with being cool was like the rebel, the bad guy, the bad guy. Yeah. Cool. Yeah.

Jason Frazell:

Yeah, you probably got to play out some inner fantasies by doing that, too. It does. It does sound I'm thinking out loud. I'm like, that does sound pretty fun just to be like a troll on like a troll on television and, like, pick on the underdogs and then get other people fired up. Like that is definitely something I'm interested in. Jealous. I'm just jealous.

Alex Terranova:

You're making Alex, turn my life around, go the other direction. Go back to the dark side.

Jason Frazell:

Exactly. You're like, so I really I've got a great relationship. Things are going well. I've written a really powerful book and podcast. I'm throwing it all the way. Man, I'm going back into the reality TV game. Well, we hope to see you on Bravo sometime getting a drink thrown in your face.

Alex Terranova:

Okay, we hear this, I know that you want to probably wrap up soon. But I have to. I actually have a fantasy. And me and Evan talk about this have I really want to have a drink thrown in my face in a public place? Not the glass, just just the liquid? Worse. But Evan and I talked about like, we should go to a public place and like act out, just make it off. Just just roleplay it. Because it's probably you know, I'm probably

Jason Frazell:

just like, so just like those shows that are just fake.

Alex Terranova:

Yeah, just Yeah. It's mostly to see like, what would you know, if you if you and I were sitting at a bar, and Evan was sitting next to me, and it looked like you and I were hanging out? And then I turned and said something that you threw a drink in my face? What would what would the bartender do? What would the other people would somebody asked me to leave with a

Jason Frazell:

great experiment?

Alex Terranova:

I just think that like there's, I don't know, there's something that fun about like, playing around with things. And I don't want again, I'm not. I've moved so far away from the dark side. I don't want to go back. But I think someone's like playing out. You've I don't know if you've ever read like existential canker. You know about the book. Like, there's stuff about our darkness, like our darkness, our shadow are the things that maybe aren't so nice about us. It serves us in a lot of ways, and so many of us like really? Push it down. Yeah,

Jason Frazell:

yeah. Oh, man. We're gonna have you back on out. So we got a lot to talk about.

Alex Terranova:

I don't know if I just took you on, like a whole tangent that you were like, wait, no,

Jason Frazell:

no, no, it's great. I also love the next question, which is coming because it's, it would have been really funny if I would have asked you this at a time and then you said that answer. What's the thing you're most proud of? That have been amazing? Like, what I'm most proud of? Is that my dark side and existential King and now but yeah, well, what's Yeah, what's, what is the thing that you are most proud of?

Alex Terranova:

Um, definitely, it's my book is the thing I'm most proud of. Because I think it's, it's, it's the most like unpredictable thing I think about for me, like, based on who I am, as a kid who grew up with, you know, learning disabilities that made it so I didn't really read a book until I was, I mean, in my 20s and I didn't even really read it read like, you know, some John Grisham books like I mentioned, but I did not I read now insanely, but I reading was really Hard for me. So I didn't read in school, I kind of slid under the radar writing was a maths and hard for me retaining information in that way. And so I actually had a teacher in high school, who said to my mom, at some point, if he doesn't figure like learn how to write, he's like, never gonna go to college, I'll never get a job. And I didn't remember that. My mom reminded me of that when I wrote my book, she was like, You should send that lady a copy with a nice little note written inside of it.

Jason Frazell:

So yeah, that's awesome. I'm not surprised. I've had quite a few authors on and, and I work with some authors on the branding side. And man, it is a labor of love. Like, it is a lot to write a book, I have a world of respect for authors. The, the, I don't know, hundreds or 1000s of hours, you don't see like iterating the editing process, the marketing of books, it's it's a thing. It's a whole thing. And I just learned about this a couple years ago, I had some friends that are authors had a bunch of authors on here. And again, because of the branding work I do. I'm like, you've got to really want it. And it's also not a good business model. Now 99.9% of the population if you're not famous, you're probably not going to make a living writing a book. Now you have to be like, really? Up there. Yeah, that's that's awesome. All right, Alex, what are you afraid might be true about you?

Alex Terranova:

So my biggest fear is that I'm gonna disappointment. And that Have you ever heard the saying like, you don't date potential? You've heard that before? Yes, I have. Yeah. And yeah, I know we I've never had that said about me, at least that I know of. But it really resonate when I heard it the first time said about somebody said about somebody else. I like so resonated as even though I've struggled with things in my life, like on a really personal level and right, I've never been without food or shelter. And I've been very privileged and fortunate in a lot of ways, on an internal and internal dynamic relationship with myself, I've struggled a lot. And that fear of like, I'm gonna let my family down, I'm gonna let you know, my my grandparents down, you know, I'm gonna, I'm gonna let these people down that really set me up and supported me in a lot of ways. I'm gonna let down my I'm gonna let down Evan, I'm gonna let down my clients is is a recurring thing that I do, right? I do the work as a coach, I have a coach, I go to therapy, right. I do all the things. But it's like, it feels like almost a, like a super villain in my story that is to be battled and overcome at some point. But yeah, that that that could be true that I am a disappointment.

Jason Frazell:

Yeah. So second part of this question, what do you do to compensate for that? Probably every therapy. I hear like my life.

Alex Terranova:

Yeah, I hear that in two different ways. Right. One of the ways is, is like what am I trying to do about it? Which is like having a coach therapy, personal development, right? Like, anything to try to say that hey, it's not a true it's not true, right? I'm no one's a disappointment. No one is that and who's right? And even the definition of disappointing based on what, right, like who defines it? How is the metric subjective, totally. But I do think that a lot of the things I've done in my life, were about proving the other side of it. You know, creat like doing things. My specialty in the restaurant world was opening restaurants. It's probably one of the hardest things to do in the restaurant world, like train open, like do all like get it's absolute chaos. And it was my favorite thing to do. And I think I loved it, because the odds are, you're going to fail. And so I only had an upside to go and I think the same thing with you know, a coaching practice. The way I want to live like, you know, the way I want to live my life where I want to live writing a book. I like kind of like being taped, choosing things and being on the side of like, it probably won't work out the underdog like, yeah, it's not gonna go because then it's kind of like, well, if it didn't go, Well, I didn't disappoint anyone because I picked something that probably shouldn't have gone well, but if I do have it be a success. Well, that I actually get to like, be celebrated, but it doesn't work because it's inside of the same model, right? It's all inside the same, like, Snowball. That snowball. What sort of

Jason Frazell:

snow globe? Yeah, cool answer. Yeah, I really resonate with that to like the coaches. Yeah, it sounds like you'd like to prove prove it context like you like things that allow you to prove that it's possible I'm the same I'm a lot of the time the same way. You know you're a podcast when people say, Oh, podcasting, there's a million of nobody's gonna listen. Not true. Yeah. So it's like fun to put things out. Or like I said, coaching practice. Oh, it's hard to, like cool what's hard, like, tell me what's hard, and I'll show you how I can do it anyway, that I really resonate with that, too. All right, Alex, it's been awesome having you on. I'm so glad we got a chance to do this. I got two more questions in one request for you. So the question is, how does Alex see the world? This is brutal. This is brutal. I love editing a podcast episode. This is brutal. That's a glowing review.

Alex Terranova:

I said brutal. Because sometimes I like sometimes there's a joke that it's like, I'm the coach that hates people like I'm the coach that hates people.

Jason Frazell:

And I know other coaches like that.

Alex Terranova:

Okay. Usually, I find that coaches are very, like optimistic and positive, really, like love people like me, and me. And I think that my, I see so much potential for humanity. Like, there's so much, there's so much that we could be that we're just not, that I'm like, disgusted with at all. And I think that the way that I see the world is, unlike a whole It's, um, honestly, I'm like a hopeless romantic, but in terms of humanity, like I hopelessly want us to be great and be all that we could be. But it's like, right, but I just, it's like it all I just see the mass and it just seems like the mess just keeps getting more and more messy. Yeah. So that's why I was like,

Jason Frazell:

yeah, so it's a it's like so you would you would identify with a bit more of skeptical and I don't mean that in a negative way. Just you know, like, a lot of personality sense was like, skepticism is like the disc model for you're more of like, the skeptical side, which I think a lot of

Alex Terranova:

people Yeah, I work really hard, really hard to cultivate the being and the mindset that to show up every day that I need to be to be successful. Right? Yeah, can't show up and be like, everyone fucking sucks and then be successful. I have to actually cultivate, I have to find positive I have to create gratitude. I have to look at how lucky I am. Right. I have to do things, because my default setting will take me way down the dark road. Yeah. And like, that's not just gonna it's not gonna go for anyone.

Jason Frazell:

Yeah, yeah. Yeah. Thanks for being honest about it. I really appreciate that. So, as we wrap up here, Alex, give us hit us with all the different places we can find you. Everything you're about to say is going in the show notes. Nobody has to jot jot these down. So just to remind everybody, Alex has a book, you have a podcast, you have a website with a super cool program for everybody out there listening and looking for some love. And things haven't worked, which I know a lot of people that things just aren't working. Sounds like a super cool thing to check out. Yes, we're gonna get some clips of you being a villain on reality TV, and anything else? So Alex, where can everybody connect with you and find you?

Alex Terranova:

The dream mason.com Basically the way mason.com Everything's there so you can the book fiction authenticity, which is on Amazon, you can get to it through there. All the podcasts I do. And I'm not gonna list them off. There's a bunch. If you want to work with me, if you want to talk to me, if you want to talk about being a reality show villain, if you want to, you know, sketch out a plan for how you can create that for yourself. I'm here for that. But yeah, the dream mason.com is the best place. And if you look more into social media, inspirational, Alex, on Instagram, which I should say, based on what we just said is supposed to be ironic, and never would have been thought of as an inspirational person. So it was a big joke. It was it was a joke when when I Yeah. When I started to turn my life around some of the first people in the restaurant business. Were like, oh, here comes inspirational. Alex and I was like, I've been on this, and I changed That's great. Yeah, it just became and then it just never changes. But yeah, it's great. Or your love adventure.com If you're curious about what it would be like you know, to take that route instead of you know, your thumb worst case scenarios, your thumbs get some rest from swiping.

Jason Frazell:

Yeah, and best case scenario, you end up on a podcast talking about how you met your love your life through this same format. Right? Living the dream as super cool. I'm happy for you. All right, Alex. Last thing for us. Leave us with some short and sweet Instagram were the words of wisdom.

Alex Terranova:

Keep going no matter what you're up to Do matter what you're doing. If you keep going, you'll eventually get there. So most of us fail or find ourselves disappointed or discouraged or whatnot, because we give up, we quit, we just stop. And if you keep going, there's always a chance.

Jason Frazell:

Yeah. Thank you again, Alex, for being on today. It was really good to get to know you in this way. Record this in real time. Keep doing everything you're doing. Best of luck to you and the significant other, keep collecting the hats. Oh, last question. Were you going to write another book for us?

Alex Terranova:

I had a new I have a book coming out soon based on my podcast, which is called how dreams are built. But it's it's based on the podcast. It's like a collection of essentially the highlights. I'm, I'm working on something right now. That I'm it's really taxing me. It's stressing me. It's, it's making me answer the question Who am I to write this book? So it's about masculinity. And it kind of it's kind of a sequel to fictional authenticity. But it's definitely it's it's a lot harder. It's pushing me in ways that I don't know that I'm, I don't even know if I'm ready.

Jason Frazell:

Yeah, well, when you're ready to talk about it, you have an open invite to come back on and share it with all the rest of it. So again, thank you so much. Great to have you on today. Enjoy the rest of your day out there in sunny California. And we will talk again very soon.

Alex Terranova:

Thanks for having me. Thanks, Alex.