Talking to Cool People w/ Jason Frazell

Mervin Budram - Brand Consultant, Coach, Award Winning Gospel Musician

June 15, 2022 Season 3 Episode 23
Talking to Cool People w/ Jason Frazell
Mervin Budram - Brand Consultant, Coach, Award Winning Gospel Musician
Show Notes Transcript

Mervin Budram is a multiple-time entrepreneur, business owner & brand strategist for high-performing brands and people, and an award-winning world-class musician, along with a track record in music production, artist development & management. Mervin has worked with some of the largest brands in the Caribbean as well as the US, Belize, and other governments to help them achieve more personal growth, impact, revenue, and freedom. 

With a background in business, marketing, and music, and with 25+ years’ experience in owning, managing & operating several successful business ventures & brands, he is considered a go-to expert in the spaces he works in by founders, business owners and entrepreneurs who want to get clear on their vision, gain the discipline, produce the results.

 Mervin is a multiple business award winner from prestigious groups, such as CENPROMYPE, Beltraide, Young Leaders of America Initiative, and more. He’s the founder of TAS Belize, a digital marketing agency as well as the founder & host of the Creative Monday Discussion show, an entrepreneurial podcast/talk show for creative, business, lifestyle, and wellness professionals who want to learn effective lessons, & strategies to develop themselves, grow their business and impact their community.

 Mervin frequently appears in the national media for his music as well as insights on business growth strategies, increasing focus, and creating more influential leadership.

 As a brand strategist and entrepreneur coach, Mervin can help any founder, business owner or entrepreneur who’s feeling stuck, disorganized, demotivated or a sense of unclarity, experience more personal growth, more impact, more revenue, and more freedom through utilizing his services.

http://www.mervinbudram.com/

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Jason Frazell:

My guest on the show today someone that I've gotten to know over the last couple of months amazing individual, Mervyn ddrum, motivational speaker, brand strategist, multimedia host. I'm going to actually give him more to his intro than he gave me. He's the host of the creative Monday discussion show. He has a an acclaimed gospel musician. We're going to talk about this. He's a humble and he's most of all, he's a humble man, and he's a dad. He's a business owner. He's an entrepreneur, Mervyn Welcome to the show today.

Mervin Budram:

Hey, Jason, thank you so much for having me. It's such a pleasure being with you. And you did create my name. A lot of a lot of people butchered some people's like Boo drum mudra Awesome. Yeah,

Jason Frazell:

I tried. Thank you so much, Mervyn. So glad you're here. We made this happen. You are coming to us. from Belize. from Belize. Yes. from Belize. Yeah. are you originally from Belize?

Mervin Budram:

Yes, I was born here. I grew up here. I've lived here all my life travelled a lot outside. But yeah, Belize has been home. It's been where I've, I've gotten groomed and trained in everything that I do.

Jason Frazell:

Yeah. Excellent. Excellent. Thank you for being here. Let's get right into it. We have a lot to talk about today. First question for you. Mervyn, what's something that you nerd out about?

Mervin Budram:

It you know, I, I was talking to my wife about this, right, I get very, I'm organizing, like if I walk into a space, and it's kind of really like disorganized, like I can't even start to work if my space is out of order. So I started to like set everything in place, I start to kind of just really structure things I would go if I walk in the house. Before I even wash the dishes, for instance, I have to make sure all the plates are from small to big call the cops are together. So it's just, it's just something that I carry in every year. And even with my file saving on my computer, if you ask me, for instance, hey, I want a picture for this instance, or whatever. And you asked me, Do you have that? I will tell just tell me the year and tell me the month that happened. And I can find it because all my folders are saved by names by dates by months, and so on, I can easily find them. So just it's just one of those things. Things I take, I guess very seriously.

Jason Frazell:

Yeah. Ever request of you, Mervyn? Yeah. Would you like me to send you my computer, you can do that.

Mervin Budram:

I could love I would love to do it. i It's therapy for me, actually, it's weird. Because when I when I need to relax, I would just come I would start organizing my emails, I would just hope God will learn. I would spend a good hour just organizing my emails and making sure everything is in the right folder and this client and this response. And these are leads and it's my relaxed therapy.

Jason Frazell:

Yeah, I can tell you, I think we do have quite a bit in common. This is one thing we do not have in common. That does not sound relaxing. I like to good on you, your your business partners and employees. And your wife is very fortunate to have that because that is not Yeah, I can do it. I do not enjoy it at all. I avoid it. I'm like, yes, it's organized enough. Yeah, interesting. All right, so we're gonna talk about comfort zones, and you're an entrepreneur, musician, speaker. So you, you do a lot of things that probably at some point, were pretty outside of your comfort zone. As a performer, I need to get on stages and such, what is something that is inside of your comfort zone that you know is outside of other people and for you, I'm going to take a couple of things off the table to make it a little bit more challenging. We're going to take speaking off the table talking about speaking and no talking about performing music or singing in front of people. So in other words, we're taking off in front of people stuff, because we know you do that, that you do it for a living and maybe you're still uncomfortable, but I'm, I'm not going to make this too easy for you. So what's something else that's inside your comfort zone that you know is outside of somebody else's?

Mervin Budram:

Wow, that's that's a good question. Um, you did take off all the easy ones that I might go to you took off, I gotta let me give that some time. I think. I think for me, something that comes really easy is to be able to see the big picture and really, like really go after it. My wife, my wife mentioned this. She says like when whenever I get involved with something like there's a sense of peace that comes in there. And I find that like, I hear a vision and I see it and I I don't get stressed by it. I'm like, Oh, wow. Okay, let's see, let's let's get it done. And let's let's How can I start? Automatically in my mind, I start breaking it down into steps to get there. And I was thinking about this. Even driving today. You know, like my parents, they had a business I grew up in a business with my parents and, and in my mind, it was easy for me to see that business skill. It was easy for me to see the future of that business and where we can go to right and I think that's something that comes really natural for it seeing the bigger picture Sure and believing in it.

Jason Frazell:

Yeah, I would agree that is something that is outside of a lot of people's comfort zones. Yeah. I, there's, there's been studies on this, that, and I'm probably gonna get this wrong, but it's something like, only 15% of all people are really true visionaries. Yeah. And the rest of the people are more the doers. And there's no right or wrong to being either those. Yeah, I always identified I, for me personally, I always identified much more as a doer. And I, I think I'm moving more into visionary based on the kind of work I do now. But I always identified in my careers, I was the guy who could give me some stuff, and I would get it done. But I never really had a big vision, like looking at my corporate career, I didn't have a lot of the vision, which I believe so when I when I hear somebody like you say that. And that's my experience of you. I'm always really impressed with that skill. Because that's such a superpower to be able to look at something and go, Hey, this is good. What would make it great? Or where does? What are the possibilities here? Especially outside of the circumstances of the moment? Yeah, it can be easy to say, hey, well, the business isn't doing well, we're not making enough money. Therefore, it's not going to go anywhere. But like, what could it be? Outside of like the reality in the moment? That's such a superpower?

Mervin Budram:

Yeah, you know, it's interesting, because I never taught, I had that I never because it's so common. And you know, it's something I do all the time you I didn't see it, you know, I'm sure it's when I started my journey of self discovery, trying to figure out what's my personal brand, my brand DNA, I started to see those things about myself. And one memory that comes up for me instant, like we I was on a band, when I was 12 years old, and we had this huge concert to do in the city. We did a countrywide tour, and everything came to this one location. And so we walked in, and the leader had all these elements on the stage, but he didn't know how to bring it together. And he was like, and then he was busy trying to make everything happen. And they just like, like, I was like 12, or 13. And they're like, Okay, work on the stage. And I took all elements, and I was able to decorate and like this layout at the core using like, our cultural drums and a boat, I got a boat on the stage. And wow, I just, I just, I never even started like as I was 12 years old doing that. And I never even realized that I was creating the set for the stage. And even when we do events, that's a big part of the role I played to pull the entire experience together, right. And, um, but it was when I started to really dive into my personal brand and my uniqueness that I started to realize, Hey, that's not so easy for everyone. And I have a, I would say, I have a unique gift in that I do have that visionary aspect. But I'm also strong on the doing, I'm very much a doer as well. And so I get the vision. And then I also know how to kind of start getting there and do the work, which sometimes can be a problem, because you if you let go, it's hard to let go. Because you know how to use it. And you also know how to make it come together.

Jason Frazell:

Yeah, that's cool. Marvin, what about the other side of that question? So reverse that question, what's something that you are uncomfortable doing something that's outside your comfort zone, and you know, that there's other people this is their sweet spot?

Mervin Budram:

You know, I, it's interesting, because I have a hard time meeting new people and connecting with new people, which is strange as an entrepreneur as someone who network, but I find that if you get me in the door and get me in front of the right person I can deliver, but to open the door, and to kinda know exactly how to kind of, you know, connect with that person or get that key to open. I tend to struggle a lot with that. So I think that's one of the uncomfortable areas for me to be able to kind of just really so pitching for instance, pitching the idea. I struggle with that. So if someone pitched that idea and we get in, I can definitely I can I can really go from there.

Jason Frazell:

All right, we need to trade. You organize my stuff. I'll be your pitchman like what you described there is totally inside my comfort zone walking into a room of 100 people and not knowing any of them. I have zero. Yeah. So walk up. Yeah, start saying hi. And knowing it's not always gonna go. Exactly. Well, but yeah, it sounds like we can do some trading. Yeah, definitely. Yeah, that's great bourbon. Alright, so let's talk about speaking. So you're you are a motivational speaker. You've been on big stages before? Yeah. If I was going to give you if I had the power to give you five minutes, and you got to speak to the entire world. What is it that you would want to talk to us about? And at the end of that speech, what would be your call to action? What would you want us to do? Five minutes mishaps?

Mervin Budram:

That's a good question. I would say goes right back to vision. Getting clear on your vision because by getting clear on your vision, it gives you that discipline that you need to release shift what you need to shift in your life and then also help you get the results that you need, you know, I find that a lot of people are stuck. They're either stuck in their minds, they're either stuck in their limitations, they're stuck in there, they're just really feeling overwhelmed or feeling kind of, like uncertain how to move. And, and a lot of that is because there's not a sense of clarity on what, where to go, you know, so I'm, I'm a person that I've, I, obviously, I wear a lot of caps, you know, I have a lot of rules that I play. And I, for years, I felt stuck. For years, I felt like I was on a treadmill and just running like a hamster on a wheel. And you're spinning, but you're not getting anywhere. And when I took the time to really get clarity on that vision, I realized that I was able to focus, I was able to kind of break free from some of my limiting beliefs. And I was able to start journey forward and start to actually see results in my own journey.

Jason Frazell:

Yeah, where what kind of support did you have to do that? And I identify a lot with your story. I for years, I felt I was satisfied yet stuck at the same time. Yeah. Which is a really strange place to be. Yeah. It's like you intellectually know that there should be nothing like wrong or that you should be happy, but then you're just not really what kind of support I for my experience is, that was not something I was able to take care of all by myself. I needed multiple support, ways of support. What about you? Did you, you know, obviously, you're married. So you have a great spouse you mentioned, but any other support structures that you'd recommend people who identify with that?

Mervin Budram:

Definitely, I would like for me what what happened. And you You brought an interesting point, because I had success, you know, I mean, I'm performing on big stage, I'm traveling, I am doing all these great stuff. But internally, I felt like I wasn't living up to my full potential. I felt like there was a lot more. And so that's when I saw this advertisement. On Facebook, a friend of mine, put out that she started to do coaching, like she's offering coaching. And I knew her from years ago, because in one of my earlier business ventures, we managed an apartment complex here in Belize for for a for a few years. So one of my earlier business ventures, she was one of those mentors that we went to, and I said, Hey, here's what we're doing. Give us some advice. And you know, we were my business partner at the time, and I were very young. We were like 2021 As we were doing this, and her name is Melanie Escalante. And so I reached out to her and I knew her I reached out to her and I said, Hey, I see you're doing personal coaching, and also vision visioneering Vision coaching, vision strategy coaching. And I told her, this is where I'm at. And I feel stuck. I feel like I mean, we were we were my wife and I were the director of a youth organization, we are having 1000s of youth conferences we're doing. We're doing our outreaches all over Belize, I'm running businesses, I'm doing concerts, I'm doing business summits. And yet inside I felt I'm not living up to my full potential. And I felt I was spinning wheels and not getting anywhere. And and so when I sat down with her, that was crucial, because that was the first time I lived. I heard myself processing because I'm a vocal processor. Yeah. And she just started to us, she just started to ask me questions. And like, I really dig deep within and I taught the session would be me listening. And I realized, up to that point, I had a lot of counseling sessions, like with my pastor and different leaders. But I didn't have coaching sessions. And I realized that at that point that I did well, with coaching, I needed someone who was not on the field with me who was looking from the outside, and just asking questions, and caused me to really process and think and really like, Okay, where are we going? Where do we want to get the ball? How do we want to get across the field? What's the most efficient way to get there? Who do we know in our network that can help us get there faster? And to have someone just kind of being like a sounding board that I can speak and hear myself back? I mean, many times it was crazy, like I set goals in those sessions. And I was like, well, in two years, we're gonna do this and boom, like in a month, everything just came in alignment, right? Yes, naturally, finally came in alignment. And I think part of that was just really digging deep and mining that treasure that would that was within me and bringing it out. And for me to hear it and then sitting sitting longer write it and kind of release it right. So I believe in coaching, I'm saying, I think having a coach having someone and I do also believe there are seasons for counseling. Definitely needed. That was in my earlier stage of my life where there was just some past hurts and wounds I needed to deal with. So the counseling is needed, but I think there comes a space where to go to the next level. You need that coaching I'm quoting, person to really get in there and help you navigate the space.

Jason Frazell:

Yeah, I love that movie. And before we go to the commercial break, I just want to say, you speak in my language here is I do, you know, one of the things I do is professional coach. And there is room for all of the different methodologies for counseling, or therapy, for consulting, for coaching, for mentorship, these things are all valuable. And any of those things when you're going to work with somebody, you should work with somebody who knows the difference, because they can become very blurred. Yeah, and it's not a good thing. Not very good, but sounds like well, and it's I was I was thinking about this, because one of the things in coaching is least in the coach training program, I went through your you relate to your clients is whole and complete, and that they already have the answers inside of themselves, which is not how you would relate to somebody as a consultant, you'd say, Oh, they they're missing data. They're missing expertise. I do love consult. I do consulting work as well. But it's, it's a good methodology. So I'm glad you got that support. And you're here with us now, unable to do that, and all the things you're up to. And this is a perfect time to take a quick commercial break. Because when we come back, we're going to get to know a lot more about all the things you're up you've been up to, and you're up to now suburban, we'll come back, come back right after this. Perfect immersion, we're back. What do you want us to know about you? Yeah, what do you want all of us to know about you?

Mervin Budram:

You know, I there's, I think when it comes down to it, you know, I am someone who wants to inspire, motivate and transform lives. I am very passionate about that. And I do that. I try to do that to all my giftings all my resources, I definitely do that to entrepreneurship. I'm very passionate about entrepreneurship, and really helping the entrepreneur. I remember, like I said, I started out in business from a young age. My, my, actually, I grew up in a business, family run business. And I remember it was like, when I was 2021 22. I got involved with some entrepreneurship programs here in Belize. And I'm like, Why didn't we find this a long time ago, right. So because of that, I, I find that to my there's a passion in me to really help entrepreneurs kind of get clear on their journey and help grow their business and help reach where they need to get also helped with a brand. Because I feel like there's a lot of people that have great talent, they have great skill, they got great offering. But when they put it out there, it's not palatable, it's not presented in a way where you want to eat this, you want to take it in, right. And so that's also one of the things that I care much about making sure that our brand in our presentation matches up to the value that you carry within you. And so it's important I think that's that's important to know about me. And then also I, I love working with young people as well. And so to my music, I have created music that really inspired music that really motivates and challenges young people. And I also do that as well it make talk show I have a podcast, creative one, a discussion show and that podcast really is focused on people who are inspirational people who are doing transformative work, to their to their business ventures, and they're sharing that and they're just giving tips and advice to help people learn how to improve themselves, learn how to grow their business, and then learn how to impact their community in a great way. So it's all of it kind of comes under this whole aspect of really inspiring people motivating and transforming lives.

Jason Frazell:

Yeah, I'm gonna I'm gonna steer the ship a little bit here because I know more about you than than the other people listening. You're a very accomplished musician. Yes. Very accomplished. Yeah, acid. Bourbon, smiling now I think I can see you're blushing. So you are a singer? Yes, I am. Yeah. What other instruments do you play?

Mervin Budram:

I, I played the drums. That was the first instrument I learned when I was nine.

Jason Frazell:

Every every parent's favorite instrument.

Mervin Budram:

Very loud. Very loud. Bang, I whenever I got stressed, I remember whenever I felt stressed, when I was doing I would go to the church building and I will get on the drums and I'll beat the crap out of that drums. Man. That was how I release right? I was my stress reliever. I also play the guitar. I'm a guitarist. I play the piano the keyboard. And I do a little bit of the recorder. I played that when I was in school. And then I'm also a singer, songwriter as well.

Jason Frazell:

So just guitar drums. Singing Do you play any bass?

Mervin Budram:

As I play the bass as well? Yeah, I

Jason Frazell:

bet you most guitar players could play a little bit of bass. Yes, yes. Yes. Same thing. And then you and then you write you write songs. And then do you compose music as well.

Mervin Budram:

I compose music I produce. Actually I had a record label. I had the first Christian record label in Belize. And I, I had like five artists signed to my label. So I produce all their music different genres. So I, I love creating, I love producing and music is definitely one of those outlets, you know, a memories coming up. I mean for me right now I was I was tasked by a couple I was getting married, they asked me to produce their wedding song. So we wrote our wedding song, and they flew me to Taiwan to deliver that song. So that was, that was super cool.

Jason Frazell:

Super cool. Yeah, that is super cool. Thank you for sharing, Marvin. Yeah, we got to know a little bit more about us. Everybody listening. So now it is your chance, as a fellow podcast host to ask me a question or two that I can answer for you that you're wondering about answered for you. And for everybody listening, what would you like to ask me?

Mervin Budram:

You know, I think what's coming up for me? Is that the show that the talk talking to cool people podcast, what's the well, how did that come about? Like, how did you get into that space?

Jason Frazell:

Yes, this is I'll tell you how I started the podcast. And I'll tell you how I came up. Sorry. I'll tell you how the podcast title came about? Because it was not for me. I've shared this a few times. I love this question. I was just starting out in my entrepreneurial journey in October of 2019. And I got to go on my first podcast as a guest. And I had a great time. And then I remember saying to my coach, and my wife had to start a podcast. So I did. And I came up with the questions that my audience knows I asked every single guest every single show, I might change them up at some point, but they seem to work pretty well. So keep them going. And I don't really remember coming up with them. In a way there was kind of like a creative ease thing for me. I'm like, hey, this feels Interesting. Yeah, I think this really allows my guests to be themselves and answer it really in almost any way they want to while still giving some sort of guidance, which as you know, as a podcast goes host can sometimes be a bit of a challenge where like people will pitch to you to come on, you say great, what, what do you want to talk with it? Like I don't know, like, well, so now here's the questions. I'm going to ask you, you do your thing inside of this structure. I had recorded about 10 episodes and hadn't released it. So I my, my target was to release on January 6 2020. And I had recorded eight or nine episodes, maybe it was even 10. And I think it was my fifth or sixth recording was Krista Rizzo as firecracker she's a she's a coach. She's amazing, great speaker, just a really wonderful human, somebody that I've gotten to know and I invited her on. And we were done. And we were catching up after we got done recording. I said, Krista, I don't know what to call this thing. Because somebody else had told me and it was it felt a little too busy. To me. It was kind of like yeah, it wasn't bad. But it wasn't thing and she's like, I don't know, I just feel like and I just feel like you should call like I don't know, like talking to cool people. And I'm like, oh, yeah, that's it. So crystal resin is I give crystal Rizzo full credit for this title. And it's such a good title, because it is actually what I do. It's directly what I do. And I have a lot of people that reach out to want to be on because like, it just makes sense. This is what I do. I talk to cool people, I literally talk to cool people. And it fits into my into my mantra that everybody that I have on. And really I think almost everybody in this world has something really cool about them. And it's not usually just the thing they do for a living. Yeah, it's usually like art. For many people, I'd say it's arguably the least interesting thing to me is what they do for a living. Not everybody. I think people I've had some fascinating, fascinating guests who do some pretty crazy stuff about other guests, like, our conversation doesn't really barely even go into what they do, because they do something that's you know, fairly common, but they have this fascinating backstory or mazing hobbies or things they do. So that is where the title of the show came from. And I changed the law. I changed the branding of it about a year and a half ago just because I wanted to rebrand like the the logo and such but that's been the title the whole time. And I don't see it changing at this point. Yeah, and you know, Merv and I think this will be a time we release this will be somewhere on episode 130 135 Somewhere on there. So you know it's yeah, thank you very much consistency. So thank you for the question. We actually have time for another one you have something else you want to ask me?

Mervin Budram:

Yes extra taking on but you know, you're talking about kind of getting in this space like did you use as a kid when you looked into your future? What what did you envision yourself? What did you see? And are you on that path? Or are you have you divert from that

Jason Frazell:

moment? I feel like you're a bit of I don't know if you heard me on another podcast or you saw me know. Wow, you're a little bit. This is a little bit creepy. But for everybody listening this is not prepared. I want to be very clear. Yeah. I know you're going to ask that I wrote a speech about why I became a podcaster. Oh, and I delivered it at Toastmasters last week. So this is a little, this is very, doesn't feel like a coincidence. So I'll share the quick story. When I was a kid, I wanted to be Johnny Carson and then Jay Leno. And then in my speech, I say something like, you know, who doesn't want to sit down and talk to interesting people, ask them fun questions, entertain, you know, as an extrovert, like, like, I like being in front of people and talking. And then I said, What, then you see Jimmy Fallon, who leaves Sarnat live and realizes he gets that chair. And I overhear working in a corporate sales job. And I realized that like, maybe I missed my window, it'd be the next host Tonight Show, which is why do podcasting. Because really, anybody can podcast you need, yeah, you need very little, you need an internet connection. You don't even need an internet connection, technically, because you could record locally, but you need some sort of microphone, which Apple makes great microphones is not what we're recording on today. We both have real microphones. But the idea is that you need you need some sort of thing to publish it to the networks and all that. So now this is my, my JSON, tiny little version. Now I do not get paid with Jimmy Fallon gets paid to do this show. I get to have a talk show, and bring in people that I want to talk to and, and get to do it. So that that is that is my past. So if you asked me this, as a kid, I would have had no idea when I was when I was a kid. There's no such thing as podcast. So that's the first Yeah. But I think yeah, I saw a world where I would end up talking to people and interviewing them. I like this better actually. Because you know, the secret and late night television, those questions are all pre prepped, because if it's Tom Cruise, he's talking about Top Gun Maverick and like, yeah, they're going to promote their stuff. That's why they're out there doing this. A lot of those questions are prompted you all as guests have my questions, but I don't ever say I want you to talk about this. It's really for you to run with, which is for me is more fun. It's more curious based versus and you know, like, and all those things. And if Tom, if you're listening, and you want to come on this podcast, and talk about Top Gun Maverick, which opens tomorrow in theaters nationwide. I'd love to have you on Tom. So if anybody knows Tom or, Tom, you happen to be listening to my podcast, which I'm sure that's top priority for you. I'd love to have you on. Well, Mervyn, thank you for both of those questions. That's fine. I was definitely you can tell. And my listeners know, I'm a passionate podcaster I love it. I wouldn't. People like 130. That's a lot of like, it doesn't feel like it's just so much fun. Yeah, so much.

Mervin Budram:

It's the same with my show, The Creator bonus show. We started that in 2020. And we've been we started as a live live streaming. Hard work is hard work, and cranking out an episode every week. And we just switched over. We're in our fifth season now. And we just switch over to pre recording. But now we're on our 66 to one episode right now. And it's been great. I love it. I see myself actually if it's if it was up to me, I would be doing this every day. But my wife is like, No, we're gonna we're gonna take it one step at a time. We're going to do one for a week. And then over time, we're going to increase increase the episodes every release. So yeah,

Jason Frazell:

it's also anybody who's in a space. It's not a moneymaker. It's not media is not a you got to you got to have some real numbers in order to make any money in podcasting or live streaming. It's just not Yeah, it's just, it's a crowded space. And it's just not something that's easy to monetize. Do you have to have a passion for it? That's one of the other things I'd say in my speeches. Don't get into any of this stuff. Because you think you're gonna become the next doc shepherd or a bit Joe Rogan like that. Those are unicorns in a space that has 800,000 podcasters, just like live streaming, because it the barrier to entry is very low internet connection, a computer to livestream you need an internet connection, a computer and a camera on your computer. And that's really in a microphone. That's really all you need. Yeah, so I'm sort of,

Mervin Budram:

yeah, you know, it's quite interesting, though, like, for me, I've had, because going back to that, getting clear on the vision, because I got clear on that vision of what I want to accomplish and what I want to do with my life, the podcasts and for us, we actually didn't start as a podcast, we started as a talk show. And we're, we're on television in Belize. And it was quite interesting. We, I believe in ownership, right? And so and what I mean by that I see myself owning my own media network, and my television network and all of that in the future. And so when we started this, the creative wonder discussion show, we started that on, on YouTube on Facebook Live. And then a television network approached us and said, Hey, this is quite unique. We like the way you're doing this show. I can can we carry this? And so a local television network here in Belize, a channel on TNC the national channels Hey, we want to carry the show. And then another one in Europe reached out and say hey, we like what we're We're seeing so our show is being carried on television, in Belize, in Europe, in Antigua. And then we also live stream. And then we decided this year to switch it to add that podcast element to it. So we just started the podcast, but the podcast element, but because of that as well, we've been able to monetize it and been able to. I'm not making any money from it yet. Sure, at least I have I've hired been able to hire staff, right works in the background to run, run the show element of it. Right. So it's quite interesting. When you get on there on that vision. Yeah, things start to fall into place

Jason Frazell:

as you're out to get some coaching from you. And what's next for my, my mini media empire of two podcasts. All right. Yeah. Mervyn, back to you. What is it that you're passionate about?

Mervin Budram:

Yeah, you know, I'm very passionate about helping people come into freedom and wholeness. I think that's freedom, because of my journey. And that that goes all the way back. Whether it's financial freedom, whether there's you know, you're you might be unhappy with your life, you might be unhappy with the state that you're in, and you're struggling in, kind of moving forward and kind of started to head in that, that that purpose that you have for your life. So I'm very passionate about helping people break free, come into freedom, as well as come into wholeness, like the really discovering the fullness of who you are, and bring bringing all of who you are to the table, because many times we show up, and we want to show off 10% of who we are, to show that 5% of who we are and, and some of us we don't even know how to use the fullness of who we are in the space that we want to be in. Right. So I'm very passionate about giving people tools, giving them handles in how to, to commit to greater levels of freedom and and how to come into greater levels of wholeness in our lives.

Jason Frazell:

I love that I'll give you something that is something that I use that from one of the things I do is I do communications coaching and training with a company called Life hikes. So we do a lot of work with large enterprises, we trained on executive presence and speaking and how to own your own room like it used to be called own the room. And we have a thing and feel free to use this moment if you like it, I thought this was really impactful. One of our modules. We talked about how humans were like diamonds, and most like a normal diamond, I think has 58 facets. And then we ask the audience, how many facets are you bring into your workplace? And the answer is usually two, maybe three are like what would it be like, if you've just brought four or five facets to workplace, it'd be so much more fun. So the whole idea that like you, and I think one of the things the pandemic and just being in 2022 in a lot of industries, it's really much more encouraged than it used to be. Yeah, but I love that I think I think it's a such a needed thing is how do you like bring who you are created to be here in this world into your work, which is actually most anybody which is so interesting, because I work with a lot of entrepreneurs, you work with a lot of entrepreneurs, when you talk to any entrepreneur, I've never talked to an entrepreneur and ask them, hey, when do you do your best work? It's always when they're doing when they're being themselves every single time. Yeah, just so interesting, because when you work in a corporation, like I did for almost 20 years, and just never get never got talked about. And it's not that I tried to bring myself but there's always you're always holding back. You don't want to know too much it's gonna be used against you like all those kinds of toxic workplace stuff. And yeah, I was fortunate I didn't really I never really had like anything bad happened my corporate career, I was like the companies like my managers and teams and such, but, man, it's like, the lesson I would just give to everybody sounds like work you to do is just bring a little bit more of yourself as actually how one of the ways you can increase your performance.

Mervin Budram:

I love that. I really love that because it really, I am going to use it by the way, good eye. It helps gives language to some of what I'm feeling and what I'm passionate about. Right and so but you know, I always tell people this working on yourself is working on your business working on your business is working on. A lot of people try to separate the two. But I find that if I am doing well personally if I'm doing well, you know right now I'm I'm working on my health for instance right now that's that's the truck. I've been on a Mac in the gym, in the gym for three months. But I find that my level of productivity, I find my clarity of thinking in the office is much better because I'm in a healthier state. Personnel. Yeah, right. So working on yourself is working on your business, working on your businesses working on yourself. You know, you can't separate the two Putri could try to separate the two and it's but it's not sustainable. Because after a while it becomes tiring because you're not being your full authentic self. Yeah.

Jason Frazell:

I love that one of the coaching questions that will come up sometimes I'll ask when people are talking about If something is not going well in their business, especially like entrepreneurs, I'll just say like, where else is that showing up in your life? And every single technical? They'll go? Ah, yeah, like yeah, my marriage, my parenting friendships, my finances. I, what my good friend She's like, where it shows up, where it shows up in one place is where it shows it shows up everywhere like, yeah, and I can look at in my, in my business in my podcasting and I can tell you the things that I'm not super happy about in my business and I can be like, well, you can make a parallel you can make a one to one connection to some of the other areas of my life too. So I love that so keep doing what you're doing. It's a really a much needed thank you message. So Mervyn, what's the thing in your life that you're most proud of?

Mervin Budram:

You know, I would say, my kids my family. I have my you know, that might people might like oh, yeah, that's that's common. But for me, that's huge. I I never thought I would have a family. I never wanted a family. I'll be honest. I was planning on becoming this corporate tycoon and just conquer the world and voted you can't

Jason Frazell:

possibly do both.

Mervin Budram:

Nobody it was just because I you know, there was a lot of challenges in my upbringing in the background, we had some dysfunctionality in our homes. And I just didn't want that. And you know, I saw a lot of people and this this is kind of going back to eras of overcoming things I've overcome and coming into freedom, right, I saw a lot of broken homes, a lot of broken relationships, and I didn't want that and but when I was 19 this is quite interesting. I broke my foot. I was playing volleyball and I I ran to save the ball. And I didn't know this was a golf course. By the way. I didn't know there was a cliff at the end. And so I ran to see if this ball looking up, I save the ball, the game continued. And I went down and I fell about 15 to 20 feet and I landed on hard clay. I shattered my instep shattered my ankle shattered my foot. The game continued, by the way because the ball went back. And it was about five minutes later there was like where's Mervyn and a girl looked over screen saw me down there. Anyways, long story short, I had to be in a cast for nine months.

Jason Frazell:

Oh my god, I

Mervin Budram:

had to put all my bones on the steel that was in my foot. Well, um, that nine months, my pastor said, hey, it doesn't make sense for you to keep living in the house I was at because I was in a wheelchair. So they offered for me to live with them for that period. And that was the first time I got to see real family, like real family. I'm not talking about perfection. They had their issues. Every family has their issues. Sure. But they were loving. There was love, there was discipline. There was a lot of structure. And I something in me said okay, I want that. So at 19, I made that decision to say, this was 9020. I wanted, I wanted that I started that's where the discipline started in my life. I I saw a vision of what I wanted for family. And I said, okay, if I'm going to have a family, I don't want to be struggling. And so I started to save $2 Every day, and I open a bank, I open a bank account and $2 every day, and I used to drink a soda and Cheetos every day. And I said I'm going to stop do that. And I took that money and I started put it in the bank. And over time, that money built up built up. And so that's one of the things I always tell people that you know, you don't have to start with a lot a little bit adds up over time to small deposit small deposits. I was able to buy a land from that money that I saved I was when when I got married, there was money in an account that I was I didn't have to go into marriage stressed, right? So thinking about my family, my kids, that's where the discipline came into, built, I built it the type of company I got into the business I built was because I wanted to be flexible for my kids and my family I wanted, I didn't want to be out there working. And my kids need me. And so anyways, everything I did was built around the fact that I really wanted to have a good family, have loving kids be there be available for my kids. Right? So that's, that's really is one of my greatest accomplishment. And it's still one of my greatest challenge because having three girls I have three girls and no boys and I'm, I'm a guy, I'm a real guy. Yeah, and having three girls and having to learn, learn how to be loving and learn how to be caring and my words and learning how to be tender. And it's it's been. So it's my greatest accomplishment, but it also humbles me the most because I go home and I have to relate with my kids and make sure that they love me and I love them still and I like them still right so yeah, it's been a journey, but it's helped me even in business because I I found that working with my staff, my team, I've learned to be a lot more compassionate to be a lot more understanding to be a lot more aware of what they're going through in their personal life and how that impacts what happens in the business and where their work. And I'm able to get in there from a position of compassion but yet still say hey, I know you're going through this We still have these things we need to get done. How can we marry the two and serve both and that nothing fails to grow? Right. And so it's been it's been a learning journey for me from from that?

Jason Frazell:

Yeah. Nice. All right. I call this my therapy question. Ready to get vulnerable with us? Maybe,

Mervin Budram:

maybe let's get four and

Jason Frazell:

you're like, let's, let's, let's, let's see, tears. Let's go there. Mervyn, what's something that you're afraid might actually be true about you? Hmm.

Mervin Budram:

I think you're tapped vulnerable, and I'm actually gonna tear off as I think about this, but just the whole, like, you know, am I lovable? And am I likable? I find that, um, Am I worthy, worthy of love? And am I worthy of being liked and accepted? Right? And I think that's, you know, I, I find that I do a lot, I find that I, I serve a lot. And then sometimes in the back of my mind, that that question comes up, you know, I'm doing all of these things. Am I doing this just to, for people to accept me? Am I doing this just, you know, because I maybe deep down inside, I don't feel loved. Although I'm not saying people. My wife doesn't love me. I'm not saying people aren't giving me love. But I'm not feeling it. Or I'm not. Sometimes I feel, you know, am I worthy of it? Right. And so I think that's, that's been one of my greatest struggle, and one of the things I've been really working on and it really goes as well back to my health actually, I've been, that's part of what's been coming up as I've been in the gym, and dealing with that like to like myself to like my body to like, you know, to just accept me. You know, I told my gym trainer, I walked in there and I told her, I said, you know, I realize this is the most I've looked in a mirror my entire life. Because the gym is full of mirrors all around. And I'm like, this is the most I've looked at myself in the mirror. And so it's it's been something I've been working on and still working on. Yeah.

Jason Frazell:

Excellent. Mervyn, start to wrap up here. Love to hear how you see the world. So how do you how do you see the world?

Mervin Budram:

That's a good question. I a very good question.

Jason Frazell:

Thank you.

Mervin Budram:

I mean, given what you know, I feel like I see the world several ways. One, I feel like I see the world as a, as a beautiful place. Wonderful, wonderful people, wonderful. Just awesome people. And I feel that if we can, if everyone discover who they are and, and they find their find who if they find a piece that they contribute, the world will be a beautiful place. And I feel like many times we often hold back we don't freely give what we have, we don't bring our uniqueness to the table. And so then it makes that it makes things incomplete. Right. So I see the world as a, as a beautiful puzzle that's waiting to for the pieces to be set in place. So it becomes a full the fullness of what it can be. Right? Yeah. And each person carries that a piece of the puzzle.

Jason Frazell:

Yeah, that's, that's awesome. We share a similar sentiment about the world. You You're much more articulate about. Somebody asked me this one. So bourbon, let's talk about how the audience can can how everybody can connect with you. How can people find you watch your show, listen to your podcast, check out all the cool stuff. Listen to your tunes. Yeah, love it. And everything you're about to give us is also going to go in the show notes. People find you and do all get get connected with you.

Mervin Budram:

Yeah, so So I have my website Mervyn woodrum.com. That's if you go to that site, that's more my entrepreneurship space. That's more my business space. I'm actually going to update that recently. But you can get all my email there. In fact, Mervyn with travel.com, you could find me on Facebook, Instagram, LinkedIn, just look for my name Mervyn Woodrum. And then my show the creative money show if you look go to creative money show.com You can have access to all my past episodes, archives, you can listen to the podcast. If you if you're like me, I like I when I'm exercising or doing working. I like to listen to a podcast so we have the podcast version for you to listen to. If you want to sit and actually watch the interviews, the video interviews are they're so creative Monday show.com And then my music if you love Caribbean authentic music, Soca fusion with some of the more modern contemporary stuff, you can go to MD freedom music.com Right and so that's MD freedom music.com And all my music is housed there and you can also find me on Spotify. Apple Music on all digital outlets look for Mervyn Bodrum dash MD, right and just Sweida MD people always like why does that MD No, Director, musical director, but musical doctor, my mom, my mom wanted. My mom wanted me to be a doctor. So she I was majoring in science in school and I realized in college I did not like oats. I don't like blood. Maybe it's science isn't for me. Yeah. And so but I love music and show I went to a performance and someone just said, Hey, you're the musical doctor. And I'm like, I like that. So there you go. I just started to use that Mervyn Woodrum, MD, and you could find out on all digital outlets and enjoy the music.

Jason Frazell:

Excellent. Alright, Mervyn, thank you so much for being on today. Last thing, yes, it was a true pleasure, my friend. Last thing, please leave us with some short and sweet words, the wisdom that we all can take and put into practice. What do you got for us?

Mervin Budram:

You know, I think one of the things that that's coming out for me very, to the point, take time to clarify your vision. I think that's definitely one of the things you want to spend time in. If you don't do that, you'll be all over the place. You you, you literally will be all over the place. I think taking time to get clear on your vision is very key. Consistency as well. I, one of the things I've learned this year 1% better every day has been working for me like it's easy to get overwhelmed. It's easy to look at the big picture and say, Hey, there's a lot to get done. But if you do one person like I did that with the gym, I say no, I can't say I'm going to be at the gym for this entire year. Every day. I'm just going to today I'm going to be in today I'm going to be in so everyday making that decision. Today I'm going to be 1% better than how I was yesterday, I will bring transformation to your life.

Jason Frazell:

Thank you, Marvin. I love that concept of Kaizen, right the Japanese concept of Kaizen is 1%. And yes over one day you get a you get a real compounding effect. make that better. Well thank you so much for being on congratulations on all the things you've been up to all the things you're up to all the difference you make in all the different types of places in your life that you touch. So you have the you do a lot of work with the youth you have the music that that makes a difference for music is such a healing thing for people, all the entrepreneurs you work with all the brand work you do just thank you for everything you do. And keep up the good work and we'll can't wait to have you back again on in again sometime.

Mervin Budram:

Thank you so much for having me. It was Thanks. My pleasure. Thanks