Talking to Cool People w/ Jason Frazell

Jim Adams - Owner of American Landscape Structures, Business Consultant, Veteran, RV Lifestyle Connoisseur

June 09, 2022 Season 3 Episode 22
Talking to Cool People w/ Jason Frazell
Jim Adams - Owner of American Landscape Structures, Business Consultant, Veteran, RV Lifestyle Connoisseur
Show Notes Transcript



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Jason Frazell:

My guest on the show today is my friend, fellow master miner, and somebody that I've actually seen in person, very recently. We're going to talk about that today. Jim Adams. Jim is a very successful entrepreneur. He owns a company that we're going to talk about today. And I don't know how he finds the time to do this. But he also helps other entrepreneurs just like who he used to be. Understand their numbers so that they can do things with their numbers and grow their company like he's done that and knowing what I know about Jim The other thing I'm going to say is he isn't him and his wife are RV aficionados, I have not been quite that far yet. I do have family members might have no clutter, have gotten an RV in the last two years. And I know you're a big big traveler, big RV person, and somebody that I actually got to give a hug to and hang out with in person last week. So now we are here virtually again, Jim, I guess we're we didn't we didn't like wearing real pants. I guess that was the thing. It was too uncomfortable to wear jeans. So we're now back on virtual again.

Jim Adams:

So confining after sweatpants? Yeah,

Jason Frazell:

exactly. So confining. So, Jim, so good to have you here. Let us know where you're coming in from today.

Jim Adams:

So I imagine I just say Charleston, South Carolina. I'm actually in a suburb called Somerville. But everybody in the world pretty much knows about historic Charleston South Carolina.

Jason Frazell:

Yeah, I've never been but I hear some of the best food in the country. It's generally here food when I hear about Charleston food and is it also a place where there's a lot of goat like there's a lot of ghosts tourism. Is that true?

Jim Adams:

Yeah, there are there are some some ghost tours. There's a lot of a lot of history there. A lot of a lot of dead people and and yeah, so and not just like really good food, but like, you know, New York City, you can go out and get a good meal. It's like, oh, yeah, you know, nothing to spend four or 500 bucks and get a you know, same caliber restaurant for for half. So

Jason Frazell:

yeah, I need to get I need to. It's one of the great cities in America. I haven't been to and I I've been you took a list of that, like the top 30 cities in America, say Charleston is on that list for sure. I haven't been there. So I would really like to. And it's not that far away. So I need to make it a point to get down there.

Jim Adams:

Right. So we can we. Yeah, we just did a staycation there with another friend of mine, another fellow mastermind or we did a we just did a staycation there.

Jason Frazell:

That sounds like fun. Next time. That sounds like a great time. All right, Jim. So we're gonna we got a lot to talk about today. So we're going to kick it off and we're all going to I'm going to get to know you better and everybody listening is going to get to know you better. So, Jim, first things first. Is everybody my audience knows I always ask this question. And I love I still love this question. What's something you nerd out about?

Jim Adams:

Yeah, I love. I love that question. So that's one of your questions. You have these like peculiar questions. Sometimes. That's one of your questions that I like. You know, cuz you know, really honestly, what it is. I don't know about you. Did you play? Did you play Monopoly growing up here? I

Jason Frazell:

did. Oh, my junior. Oh, I played Monopoly. And I hated losing a monopoly. Yeah. I don't like losing anything. Yes. I'm a monopoly. I was a monopoly player, for sure.

Jim Adams:

Yeah, so my, my business is my Monopoly game. Not Not that I'm trying to crush everybody and put everybody out of business. But um, although you know that there's one guy in particular, that will be okay, but yeah, exactly. Um, but, um, it's just nerding out on numbers. And I do it, I do it pretty often to figure out, you know, where can I move the needle? And so it is a passion of mine. Um, you know, I, I actually, I actually enjoy it, like getting into whether it's like Google Analytics, or Google AdWords or spreadsheets or, or whatever, or, you know, we track metrics for our sales team. Getting in there and seeing where, well, we can move the needle where, you know, if you do this, this will happen. And so that is like, strangely fun for me.

Jason Frazell:

Yeah, that's definitely something that I don't love. Yeah, there's a reason I do what I do. Yeah, because I don't I'm a communicator, a podcaster. You know, I'm a coach and brand person and that's all because partially because I don't really I don't, I like simple numbers. I'm actually quite good at simple numbers, but break it. I could do it. I'd rather just hire you to do it for me. i This is not something that fills me up. So since we've Are you here? We've got your brilliance. We're going to, we're going to get the audience some wisdom from you right now. Right now. So we have entrepreneurs, business people listening. Really, anybody in business, everybody in business deals with numbers in some way? What would you have? What's the first thing? Well, let's take somebody who owns their own small business, like what you do? What's the first place, you'd have them look at where they can move the needle?

Jim Adams:

First place in their business. So I'll back up a step from there. So first of all, when you bring when you bring up the idea of knowing your numbers, or focusing on your numbers, it's like eat your vegetables. It's like, really? No, I don't want to do that. Talk to me about sales. Talk to me about efficiency, talk to me about anything. Anything at all, but numbers, and so so I feel, yeah, so what people don't see is the different ways that you can use numbers to grow your business. Because if you, if you don't know your numbers, there's a number of things that it's you're kind of handicapped. And so the it's not just, I think if it was just, you know, you asked me the other question about nerding out, it's what you can, what I can do with them. And so in, that's where the consulting arena is so fun, as that I can, you know, I can get my head wrapped around and know their like, pretty quickly and know their business better than they do and then and then explain it to them. Like, yeah, if you did this, you know, I can tell you stories, you know, if you did this, tomorrow, this will happen, or next week, this will happen. Yeah. And you would, you would have a lot more money to grow your business. And I've done that. And so, you know, when you've done that, you know, that kind of makes something that would ordinarily be be kind of, you know, dry and boring. You know, much more exciting because oh, well, yeah, you mean, I can use that. And that's going to help me sell more. I mean, who doesn't love to? Yeah, to do more sales, right? I mean, everybody, anybody in business, you know, everybody wants to do more sales? Yeah. But, but most people say, oh, yeah, you know, numbers. Yeah. Especially accounting, like that's, like, even I don't like accounting. No,

Jason Frazell:

no, but that this is where we do have in common, it's something we nerd out about, is I really like to make more money. And I like to help people make more money. That is something I definitely nerd out about. I don't like to do it through the methodology of knowing your numbers. And that's what I'm also thinking about, Jim, as you're talking about that, because we know each other, but we've never really talked about this part of what you do at length. We're gonna do a little bit of it here on the show today. That's such an easy return on investment for business owners. To have you come in, take a look at the in the methodology you do, which then we're going to talk about later today. And then be able to say, hey, here's three actionable things, boy, yeah, but what a, what a, what a easy return on investment to prove out, which is always a good thing when you're selling in a services based business.

Jim Adams:

Yeah, absolutely. I mean, like, literally one of the challenges that I have, is that some of the numbers that we get into, like, if I was going to tell you this, like one particular story, I mean, it just doesn't it like it doesn't even sound like like, there's just no way this guy's he's gotta be making this up. There's just no way that like, for example, the shed company could be going from, you know, from from zero to x. In just a couple of years. There's just no way. But yeah, that's where we're, it's super important to actually use your numbers. That's kind of what's missing in the whole equation, is that, you know, there's these books and resources and, and accelerator courses, and yeah, all these different things about, like, trying to teach it academically, but actually looking at what your numbers are. Now that has a little bit more zing to it. Yes. Now. And now the conversation. Well, it's a conversation and it's a conversation about you, the business owner. So I guess that's what you know, we're actually kinda has more life and know your numbers.

Jason Frazell:

Yeah. One thing before we move on here. I remember hearing somebody talking about this in the, in this space, there's a lot of courses and ways to do these things and all that. And so I think this is actually something in a mastermind, you and I were at where they were talking about, there's like, yeah, I made a million bucks, right? I hit a million dollars. And this is somebody who was more than author. Yeah, he's like, and then I sat down with my with my accountant, and I realized that I spent $910,000 to make million dollars. I remember who that was. Yeah, I do, too. I won't say his name here. But it's like, great, man. He's a public figure we could. He would like it. I think he probably wouldn't do his job. Goins, he's an author and speaker and really, really great guy. But I thought that's so interesting because all these gurus, like, I'll help you get to seven figures, and part of that methodology can be, we're going to spend, you know, 100, we're going to spend a half million dollars on Facebook, Google and Instagram and LinkedIn, like, great. So how much you're paying per lead? Who cares, right? If you're paying, if each lead cost you $1,000, and you make $1,000 100,000, not 100 $1,000 plus $100, who cares, I'll go get a full time job and just do that. So I know, you and I could nerd out about this part of it all day long. We have a lot of opinions here. But I'm going to move us along to the comfort zone questions. You know, these, I'm excited to get you a little uncomfortable, Jim, because I know that you're not used to maybe answering some of the more personal things. So Jim's Jeff is smiling here, because he knows that at some point, we're gonna go in on some personal stuff, which you're really comfortable with the business. So what's something that is inside your comfort zone that might be outside of somebody else's comfort zone? Besides looking at numbers, we know that that is not a thing that a lot of people are comfortable with? What's something else? It's inside your comfort zone?

Jim Adams:

That's inside my comfort zone? It's

Jason Frazell:

inside of your comfort zone? And you know, this is outside of other people's?

Jim Adams:

For sure. sales conversations. So my dad actually wrote a book on sales conversations, you know, kind of old school way back and on Tom Hopkins days. Yeah, I watched my dad on the phone going into people's homes. And so I've appreciated you know, the art and science of selling back from my, my, my teen years. And so even though it can be uncomfortable at times, because I'm an introvert. I can't make up my mind if I'm an introvert or an extrovert. Or maybe I'm just moody. I'm not sure. But

Jason Frazell:

that's the quote of the episode. I don't know if I'm introverted or extroverted. I might just be moody.

Jim Adams:

Yeah, yeah. Yeah, exactly. Because, like you can hear right now, like, I'm really enjoying myself, I'm into this. And then times, I'll just want to just hide up on myself, but I really do love sales conversations. Yeah. And, and making them better and, and making it easier and more comfortable for the buyer and helping them helping them with their journey, while also helping them believe. You know, I'm gonna have their back and they need to do business with me.

Jason Frazell:

Yeah, that's, that's awesome. Well, and I think we'll, we'll probably get into this after the commercial break about where you have a really successful business, which is really a fun to me, it's a really fun business, because it, it really impacts people's lives. And I can't think of any way that that wouldn't be an impactful thing. So we'll talk about that a little bit later in the episode, because I want to talk about that, because I've I don't know anybody else who does what you do. It's pretty cool. So now, Jim, maybe this is the thing that I'm excited about. And you might not be so much. But I'm gonna go here because I've asked all 120 of my other guests about this. What's something that is outside of your comfort zone? That might be inside of somebody else's?

Jim Adams:

Yeah, so this, this brings to mind the quote from Robert McNamara is actually two quotes. He's the first one is why don't know that, you know, there's some younger guests. They might not know who Robert McNamara is, yeah, he was a major major Fick figure political leadership figure during the Vietnam War here. So anyway, the first quote was, he said, you know, he says, Never, never, never say never. And the second thing he says is, he says, never answer the question you're asked. Like, a true, you're gonna really, I'm gonna, I'm gonna sounds very, very Trumpist they really does. I'm gonna, but I'm gonna go ahead and in and try to honor that question. And it is kind of that. You know, that introvert thing? Like, you know, when we were in the, in the bigger it wasn't even a mastermind group. It was almost 200 people and we're supposed to be you know, you're supposed to be talking to your friends, but you're also supposed to be trying to meet new people in and, you know, get to know new people and big crowds. And oh, I know, like, the worst for me, is a big dinner group. Like I like I like like one on one or maybe for Mac six people. Yeah. And you get a in a big group or a bar or something like that. Now, when I was drinking, I was fine with that. But yeah, you know, now that I'm sober. It's just like, oh, it just, it just, I want to I really like to. I really like to connect with people individually. And then when there's this big group of people, there's just this cacophony. That is just like I want to get at you

Jason Frazell:

Get me out of here. Yeah, this is where you and I are exactly opposite, which is also why last Thursday evening, I was out with about 30 people at 130 in the morning, and you were not there with

Jim Adams:

no care. And I, we we had one club soda and left we played, you know, because our bellies were a little empty. We had a cheese plate and we had a drink. And we laughed.

Jason Frazell:

So yeah, this is so this is interesting. And this is one of the things I love about the show. I like both of the things you just said, Actually, I just love people. So I'm a complete extrovert. I'd love to go and have dinner with you. I'd love to go have dinner with you and your wife and two other people. And I'd love to be at the bar with 100 people. I don't really care. As long as I'm, I'm just interested in good communication. I liked the cacophony. And I liked the small thing. What I don't like are boring conversations. Oh, oh, yeah. And what I find with that, yeah, I think this is yeah, right. And and what I think you and I are both fortunate in that we live in spaces where it's almost never a boring conversation. Like, right, Mike, most of the people that that we know, in kind of the same circle we run in, they either do something cool. Well, most of them do cool stuff. Like you're a good exam, I think what you do is super cool. But most of the people that we know, they're they're really interested in other people, which by definition makes the conversation interesting. I think I'm really interested other people, there's nothing more boring to me, Jim, than a conversation with a person talks out talks at you for two hours, about what they do, who they are, who they know. And I was in a conversation like that a few weeks ago, and I was just thinking about something I just don't care. I just don't care.

Jim Adams:

So yeah, no, no, I'm with you. I mean, that it was about I don't know, it was about three years ago that I kind of that I up my game personal growth wise. Yeah, that's where I started, you know, I got into mastermind on a national level. Yeah. And just started hanging out with, you know, not not putting anybody down, just started hanging out with, with smarter people, and more interesting people and people that have more awareness of what a conversation, you know, how a conversation goes. And I think one of the one of the really big things that I really like, is that people don't feel smaller. If you if you had a win, like whatever it might, yeah, that that does not make, like I can tell you, I can tell you about anything. And you're not going to feel smaller or less than or anything, you're going to do nothing but say, Man, that's, that's really awesome. Yes, and it's not bragging because I don't mean it as bragging. It's really like, I'm a little kid, and I just added three houses to the orange spaces on my Monopoly board. And I'm excited about it. I love that. Yeah, you know, or, I don't know, if you remember this, you know, I remember being at the, at the swimming pool, and being able to do, you know, being able to do a backflip, which was about all I could ever do, but it just wasn't. You know, I was raised by a single mom. And it just wasn't as cool. Unless I could get somebody to watch me. Of course, you know, ask my mom. Hey, Mom, you know, watch me do this backflip and then it was like really, really cool.

Jason Frazell:

That's great. I love that. Yeah.

Jim Adams:

Yeah, that's really fun. Yeah,

Jason Frazell:

that is fun. Let's talk about giving your speech to the world. Well, first of all, do you like speaking? Do you like public speaking?

Jim Adams:

I like the idea of it. I just don't have a lot of practice. And so the preparation part, I'm, I'm working on that. And so. So yeah, I think I will get good at it. And, and so I like I like being on stage in front of small groups where you know where it's really about them? Yeah. So that's, that's what I really like.

Jason Frazell:

Cool. So if I gave you five minutes, and I gave you a little bit bigger stage, and this stage had everybody in the world who you just everybody got to hear your message. What is it that you would talk to all of us about? And what would be your call to action at the end of your five minutes?

Jim Adams:

Yeah, so I think I think I'd have to go back to you know, something, you know, a mutual friend of ours, as far as it really is not, it's not a hard question to answer. And that is, is that a, like, what pisses you off? What breaks your heart and what problem are you trying to solve? Right? Yeah, where that came from? I'll just say it's Mike Kim that says yeah, spikes? Yeah, no brand three fellow podcast guests. Yes, yeah. Yep. mutual friend of ours. So the the first part is just, you know, content courses, accelerator courses, books that just, you know, missed the mark, when it comes to the second thing that breaks my heart, which is the business failure rate, you know, the business failure rates about 80%. That's a, you know, that's a statistic to a lot of people, but I've actually, you know, watched while somebody's stuff went to auction, and we'll, or I've actually, you know, had the conversations with the banks to buy some more time or with the vendors to, you know, please, you know, let's work this out. So you can you continue to ship us material, while we get our, you know, our cash flow back on track? Yeah. Like, I've, I've had those,

Jason Frazell:

you've been there, you've been that business owner who's had to have those conversations.

Jim Adams:

The consultant for for them, I haven't had to do that for, for my business, like, yeah, you know, not that I have, you know, done some things that got me into trouble. But for as a, as a full time consultant, I had to do that too often. You know, one thing I'd say, you know, I did some turnaround work in. And no one should ever, ever need a turnaround consultant, it's just really, really sad. Yeah. And so you know, so that's the problem I solve is that no one should ever need a turnaround consultant is if you can learn just a few, a few basic things, which I can give you in a few hours, I don't know, I might be able to pull that off with a book. But, you know, that's not written yet. But really, the the interaction in just, you know, in just a few hours, you know, if not with me with, you know, with with somebody that, you know, knows what I know, and has been where I've been to, it's just a few different things. It's just knowing more about yourself having some blind spots. No, and a big thing is knowing what area like there's a whole lot to business mastery. Like it's a huge, huge thing. There's, you know, there's accelerator courses and classes and stuff than that. But where the hell do you start? You know, if you're good, you know, like, what are you good at? Where, where do you even start it so overwhelming. And so that's one of the things that, you know, one of the problems I solve for people, like for my business, I realize, I need to start with, I was not good enough at hiring, I have made some bad hires, and I realized I needed to get better in that. So I made a massive investment, including hiring a coach and expensive coach, and getting better at hiring and it paid off like I have a I have a ninja project manager now. The Ninja project. That's cool. Yeah, he's like, amazing. So, so yeah, solving that problem as far as, as far as not just keeping them away from failure. Yeah. But actually helping them be. Be like, really have the business of their dreams, where they have, they have actual wealth and time off and things like that. So yeah, very cool.

Jason Frazell:

Very cool. Jim, we're gonna take a brief commercial break. And when we get back, we're gonna get to know you. We being me as included, we're gonna get to know some more things about you. So you got it. You got to talk about yourself more. I hope that's alright with you. Even if it's even if it's not, it's not my show. Anyway. Yeah, back after this.

Unknown:

The talking to cool people podcast is brought to you by Jason for sell coaching. Jason works with amazing people who are looking to find and develop their passion and purpose and create their journey to wherever it is they want to go. Check us out at Jason frazell.com, Facebook or on Instagram. Jason loves hearing from anyone who thinks it would be cool to connect, to be coached, or to be a guest on our show. email him at podcast at Jason frazell.com or DM him on Facebook and Instagram. And now, back to some a more amazing conversation on talking to cool people.

Jason Frazell:

And we're back, Jim. So I know I have a lot of questions for you. And I always like to restrain myself from asking those until I asked you them but big, wide open question. And have you answered this for us? And then then I'll dig in right? Where I'm curious about where I see fit. So Jim, what else do you want? All of us to know about you?

Jim Adams:

Well, I would say probably how focused I am on just just living my life with my wife. I mean, we just we spend a lot of time together. We're buddies. We're Best Friends. And, you know, that's what really matters. And so when, you know, when COVID hit, and my business blew up, like that was really, that was very challenging, because I was just so just overwhelmed with fires and, and customers and just people beat down my door, and, you know, was not able to be as present as I wanted to be. And so, you know, when I think about, you know, their mindset and personal growth and things like that, it's super, super critical about being able to be being able to be present with the people that I'm with my mind just can't be. without, without intention, my mind will be focused on, on, you know, conquering the world and the consulting business and, and writing a book and, you know, getting $2 million a year in profit. And, yeah, that's other stuff. So I have to be very intentional about, about just being being there in my home. With Kara.

Jason Frazell:

Yeah, I think now is probably a good time. For us to talk about what your business is, we've hinted at it, and you just hinted that it blew up during, during the pandemic, would you like to share? Or would you like me to share? Because I know the answer here.

Jim Adams:

I think it'd be better if you did, yeah. Yeah.

Jason Frazell:

So for everybody, for everybody here with us. Jim owns a really successful company called American landscape scrub structures, and they build these beautiful backyard pavilions, and you do it for and this is not a commercial, I'm just telling these are facts. I mean, it gets it's a commercial, these are pavilions that private owners will put in the back in their backyard, or I guess, usually the backyard, with grills under them outdoor kitchens. And you also have a commercial version of this, where you do these things for parks and more civic projects. And they're, they're stunning. They're really cool looking there. And that's interesting is when I when I met you, I met you about about a year into the pandemic. And you were telling us that you were just overwhelmed by the amount of business because everybody's at home, and they're like, you know, wouldn't it be nice, I'm sure that the conversation is, especially as you get down further south, wouldn't it be really nice to be able to work outside, and if it rains, I can still stay out here and work. So you know, congratulations on your success. And the reason that you were ready to support that business is because you had a business before that was well and well structured, and you knew your numbers. So when it came time you actually knew how to scale quickly, and keep up with the demand. That is my understanding of how it's gone for you. Anything you would add there, Jim?

Jim Adams:

Yeah, I mean, if it had just been me, when the pandemic hit, I'd have just totally, totally missed out. So yeah, so when the pandemic hit, we doubled I had, I had just hired a couple of key people. And then and then the year after that same thing, so we went from, you know, a little over a million, like two and a half million to 5,000,002 years. And, and again, I had mentioned earlier that, you know, gaining that hiring skill. And so instead of just getting average people, I got some pretty extraordinary people that could get it done and, and really look after our customers. And then we also upped our game with who, with the contractors we work with to help us with our website to make that perform better. So really just the overall area of finding better people. And in also having some just amazing, you know, amazing Amish, craftsman suppliers, closer to your neck of the woods. Yeah, in Pennsylvania. Sure. Just make it you know, make things. It provides a great opportunity for us. And of course, you know, we on the marketing side, we help keep them super, super busy.

Jason Frazell:

Absolutely. Yeah, that's that's awesome. The other thing I wanted to mention here and just call you out publicly, you haven't shared this as you're also a veteran. So thank you for your service. How I was curious about this, and we've never talked about this, but how do you see your military service helping you with everything you're up to now in the business perspective, so the Know your numbers that part of your business, the running a business, how do you see that all integrating or how has that integrated over the years for you?

Jim Adams:

Yes, I would say sense of urgency. So when I when I got out of the military in the in the late 80s and entered civilian world. The lack of intensity really rubbed me the wrong way I had and I didn't do well and I did not do well. And corporate as a 30 something year Old. Most of my work was independent. But whenever I intersected with corporate, it was not. I didn't last I last I was like eight years before getting into. But it opened up the doors and a consulting. Yeah. And so the the cool thing is about that intensity and that sense of urgency where you're commerce is life and death. You know, it's not, it's life and death, like, right. I was in the artillery where the standard is 30 seconds. Like from the time the guys on the ground call for help. To the time they get it is 30 seconds and get the actual ordinance dropped on Yeah, we will be coordinating only which which, by the way, we were in the process right now it's sending some of the howitzers over to the Ukraine that I used to work on. Some of my buddies, my buddies were joking around in a text string today that we know a few guys that know how to operate, operate those. Yeah. Anyway. So that intensity, and so one of the coolest things about the numbers that most people have no idea of is, like if you know the numbers, like the sense the different sense of urgency the the different way that you would show up, like most people just say, a typical small manufacturer construction, or just a company that's got labor and materials, okay, which is a lot of companies, not all, but a lot of companies have labor and materials. Most people have no idea. The simple, like the relatively simple math is that if you increase your business by 10%, roundabout, your profit is going to be roundabout, roughly 40% Higher. So that means you have a million dollar business. And your profit is $100,000. And you increase your business to 1,000,001. Then your profit goes from 100,000 to 140,000. And most of the idea of that, I didn't know the first thing that I do. Yeah, so the first thing I do when I show up is so that sounds kind of like what that kind of it sounds a little bit like, not only did I not know that, but it kind of sounds maybe a little bit like BS like Matt, you got to show me so the first thing I do is take somebody's financials. And I've got a tool that some project manager gave me 20 something years ago, I still use, and I dumped their numbers into this into this tool, their their profit loss statement, I dumped the numbers into this tool. And I show them their numbers and say, Okay, now these are your, you know, without getting too technical, you know, here's your, your fixed cost, here's your variable costs. And so in just a quick, what f so, you know, this is this is the like, where the magic happens? Yeah. And why I was able to, you know, get these people to invite me to stay, instead of sending me back to the airport, where I came from over and over and over again, you know, they would invite me to stay at kind of a pretty, pretty crazy rate, you know, round about 2500 bucks a day. Yeah. They would ask me to keep coming back, you know, day after day, week after week, was based upon that. Oh, wow. You know, this is what's really possible. And that sense of urgency. So once that's emergencies there, then everything. Everything changes.

Jason Frazell:

Yeah. Last thing I want to ask you here, before we move to the next section. Does that sense of urgency, in your experience? When somebody is in I'm not gonna say necessarily dire straits. Although I'm, like you said you've worked with companies that are in dire straits. Like they need some real help, right then. So they have their own sense of urgency. It's like survival urgency. So this is kind of goes back to the military thing, right? Like survival urgency like this is life or death. What about how do you help companies? Or what would you suggest people listening that own their own companies, and they're not in survival mode, but who's not going to be enticed by the pay as you increase? You get a 40% return on a 10%? You know, like a 10% increase? How do you generate that sorts of urgency? Because I'm sure you know, as a consultant, there are times people say no to you, I'm sure you say that, hey, this is not the right time. What would you recommend as soon as they can really feel a sense of urgency? What would you say to them?

Jim Adams:

So it's what is it that they really need? So what I find most of the people that I deal with? Even if they have a financial comfort level, which which they may for the time being at least Yeah. It's it's pretty common that there's that there's time issues and that there's stress issues like what if maybe they're not having a hard time paying their bills, but they're definitely having a hard time. With a with that, that focus. I mean, I'm really glad that you brought up the socket survival thing, because that's a, that's a really good point. And so that's one of the things that is really great is that if you can get out of that, that's where the creativity really opens up. And that's where you can get into, if you want, like, you, you get Pat, you actually do get past the point where, like, money's not the main thing anymore. Sure. Because Because your basic needs are met, where you're getting into the, you know, you're making hundreds of 1000s of dollars a year. And, and, and how much money do you need, but it gets more into into the time is, you know, if you have 10 or 20 people working for you, like a lot of these companies, you know, everybody reports to the owner. Yeah. And they're not empowered to make their own decisions. And so they're constantly bugging the crap out of the owner. Yeah. And so, you know, most people if they, if they like, I mean, I got, I got my business up off the ground. volume wise and money in the bank was, was as miserable as I've ever been. Because, yeah, yeah, because there was just just so much activity. And I didn't have a team that was empowered to make decisions and make things happen. versus, you know, the last few weeks, you know, going to the mastermind, where I saw you I was two weeks before that I was, you know, rambling around Wyoming and Denver with my wife. And, and like they just didn't, just just didn't need me, there was no fires, if we were able to, to enjoy ourselves. And, and, and not have to deal with fires and constantly solving problems.

Jason Frazell:

Yeah, that's beautiful. Jim, thanks for sharing all that. All right. flipping the script, you're now the podcast host. I've given you that. Podcast hosting. It's a crowd. Do I have a crown on the show? I don't know. I'm giving you the I'm giving you the the boss the boss, microphone. So Jim, what do you want to ask me that I can answer for you and for everybody listening.

Jim Adams:

So one thing actually I have actually been wanting to talk to you about is like, what is it like to be coached by Jason for Zell? Hmm.

Jason Frazell:

Oh, this is such a loaded question. Nobody's ever asked me this. This is fantastic. You're looking for? You're looking for my style, you're looking for kind of what I do. Like what what all of it? What are you looking for?

Jim Adams:

Answer the question you want me to ask? You

Jason Frazell:

know, Jim, this is what we do. As coaches, we'd answer questions with questions and annoy our clients. Now the Yeah, so there's probably some my clients listening to this episode, which is a very interesting thing. So if you have been coached by me, please email me or hit me up on Instagram and tell me if I'm way off. But I generally, what I would say is I want to, I want to do two things I want to I want to talk about who I am, right, because that's a big part of being a coach or consultant is who you are for your people. And then I'll talk about what I do, who I am thinking most people at my best, and not every session is that I'm at my best, that would be a pretty unrealistic expectation. I would love to think that's the truth, but I not completely self aware. But I understand that I'm not always my best, but I my best. I'm really, I'm the same person that you know, as a friend or as a husband, or as a parent, really connected. I'm really connected. I'm really committed to having fun. And I'm, I think this is one of the reasons you and I get along. I do come with a strong sense of urgency and a strong drive, to moving something forward. This comes from my sales background, who I was I was in athletics, and I was younger, just although, like I like to win, I'm competitive, and I like to drive things forward. Had me have a pretty successful business career. And, you know, I feel pretty successful now in what I do. The difference is that I've had to learn and this is like the other experiences I've had to learn to turn that down. Because my pace may not actually be the client's pace. This is this is a little bit of the under Yeah, totally. Totally with you on that. Yeah. Because well, and you know, I relate to you as a consultant but you're a coach too. I'm sure you ask good questions. These are not all purely Jim's gonna come in to teach you how to do this that you have to uncover things is an and you see so much for your clients sometimes. And you can't just give it to him because Then you're just another, like you said, person who's telling people how to do things or doing it giving advice, and they didn't ask for it. So the experience that people probably have with me sometimes is that they, they probably understand that I have a lot to offer. And sometimes I ask them for permission, would you like this? For me, that's been a big, that's a big thing in coach, like, the kind of coaching that I do is client permission, client chooses the path. I know a lot of stuff. But unless you asked me for it, or we have an agreement that that's taken off the peer coaching had, and I know you've done coach, coach training, as well as put on the consultant head, I'm not generally just going to give you a bunch of answers. Because a lot of the things I don't have answers to, by frankly, most of what my clients bring to me. So that's like who I am for them. The structure. And the way I'm trained and the way I generally coach is through, its client driven. So this is a International Coach Federation framework is not that I'm the expert that I'm going to tell you how to know your numbers. Or I'm going to tell you how to grow your business from seven figures, eight figures, what I am trained well in is listening to you watching for the whole of you, what you're saying, what you're not saying? What's firing you up. And that what is body language energy, what's bringing you down? Where do those things are not in alignment, people like I'm super excited, and I'm like, it doesn't feel like you're super excited. We'll get for that. And I'm looking for in listening for generally, what's not being said and getting curious about those things. And you I know you've worked with some really great coaches, that's what makes great coaches, great coaches, if they're peer coaching, is because you and I can go out and hang out together and have a fun friend conversation, I can give you a bunch of advice, you give me a bunch of advice. coaching in the way I do is like is that what you want the moment? So one of my favorite questions that I ask my clients, and this is something that when I'm doing more facilitation training, because I do a lot of that work, too. I haven't brought a lot of that to our mastermind. But I do a ton of like facilitation work and public speaking work is what would you like for me in the conversation? And people choose that? I want you to coach me, I want you to sit and listen. I want you to give me your opinion, I want you to tell me about your background and doing it that way from from choice. And then at the end of the day, the structure is we get we get a request, what are we working on? Just like you're working with inside of we would call it a project with your clients? Hey, the project is to know their numbers. And whatever that project is, is it increased sales? Is it save the company, I'm always looking to work with my clients inside of something that matters to them that's outside of the problem of the day. Because that becomes pretty arduous for both of us. And we're good coaching, in my opinion is like I look at as an improv scene. You set the stage and if you've have you ever done improv, have you ever been to an improv show? The prompt is generally Hey, what's our topic or Hey, yell out a word. And so that's the topic that I'm talking about my client. And then for the next 50 or so minutes, we're karo co creating some sort of conversation based on where the client wants to take it. And then the last 510 15 minutes is, hey, from all the insights we've generated together. And if you were my client, Jim, Jim, what are you going to do with this? What are you going to do with these insights? So this is where you get into the tangible, sometimes the SMART goals, what are the new learnings? What are the things you're going to do? This is like this is this is the really facilitative part of it is Hey, until I see you next week, or in two weeks, or next month, what are you gonna take on based on this conversation? Otherwise, at the end of the day, you can go see your therapist, and coaching is not therapy, but you know, some similarities sometimes. Or we could just have a fun friend conversation. So what are we going to move forward? I'm very I'm always looking to the future like what's next for the client? Soldier like asset? Hey, based on what we talked about today, Jim, what do you see to move forward? What what are you going to take on so when I see you I can say hey, how did that thing go? And ask it so that's in a nutshell, but not trying to be succinct here. I don't know how well I'm doing. But that's what it's like, as far as it lands for me over here. Now, I don't know that every single person would totally agree with that, but that's okay. Because it's their experience not mine. Good answer your question. I think so. Whew, that's a good one. Wow, I've never answered that before. That is a I got a little vulnerability hangover here like sharing that. With everybody. David, thank you, Jim.

Jim Adams:

I got to give you some of your own medicine. Yeah. You see what Jim is here? Yeah. Now can I share that, like we're in this other mastermind that you that you started and you ask these, like, improv type questions. And like when I just hear that, like improv thing I like get into like a mini panic attack. I didn't know if he knew that about me or not.

Jason Frazell:

Yes, I am. I am well aware watching you. When I asked, when my you know, my partner and I for that mastermind group that we run, I'm well aware when there's a question that you're not prepared to answer because I could see it, I can see it in your face.

Jim Adams:

Yeah, yeah, I have, there's a thing about me, you know, I have this like, precision and like, the meaning like, what is this really mean? So when you have ask a question, and I'm not sure I'm just, it's just like,

Jason Frazell:

Yeah, well, so that's the, I don't want to wrap with this part. And say, it's something that's really interesting, is my natural thing is when I asked those questions, I'm genuinely curious. And I don't know the answer. And that's when coaching is at its best. So I also train coaches through a coach training program called accomplishment coaching is amazing. I went through it four years ago, I'm a leader there. Now, one of the things that we train our coaches is sometimes the best coaching is when you as the coach show up as a five year old, how to five year olds ask questions, they ask questions that they don't know the answer to. So that's, like, when I'm asking some of those questions that you've heard, or I'm asking private clients, these questions. Most of the time, I genuinely don't know the answer, kind of like this podcast, I genuinely don't know the end

Jim Adams:

really, really key. I have found that and asking questions. Now I'm asking a different kind of questions that you are. But the person I'm asking the question to is super hung up on the idea that there has to be a right answer to the question. Yeah. And I'm not coming from that place at all. No, I'm asking a question to get information to find out how they what they're thinking. You know, not necessarily like, like, I already know the answer to what I'm asking. It's like it comes out of the, you know, multiple choice academic system right there like there has to be, we're going to have a whole conversation about that subject alone.

Jason Frazell:

Yeah, no, totally. That that's, that is generally the, when retraining new coaches and the lifelong journey for most coaches that I know, I know, a lot of, I know a lot of good, well trained coaches, the lifelong journey is, it's not about you, it says the same thing with speaking. And you said this, or that it's not about you, it's about the audience. It's not about me, it's about you as my client, if you're my client, and that when I'm asking leading questions, or questions that I know the answer to that's about me, because that's my ego boost of I already know the answer to this question. When I asked you these things, subconsciously, usually, the reason you're doing that is so that I can feel right. Usually not always. And so well, so elicits

Jim Adams:

a level of suspicion. So it doesn't really doesn't really. And I've been guilty, I've realized, Oh, well guilty of that. Yeah,

Jason Frazell:

I say this, let me be very clear about this. I say this not from a high horse at all, I say this from a 20 year salesperson who asked almost every question of my own agenda attached to it. And that's to close the deal. Because that's how you're like, that's how I was trained in sales is you lead the customer on a path and there's nothing wrong with it, because that's what we're trained to do. But this is no high horse or soapbox over here. This is me, pointing them you know, like holding up the mirror myself, me like I am. I'm still super guilty of this. Not really as a coach anymore. But man, I'm good at leading the witness. I'm good at like,

Jim Adams:

and I'm just now realizing, as you're saying that how much I hate that. Yeah. I mean, somebody can even ask you, you probably heard this before, when you got a telemarketing call. Like how are you doing today? It could be something that's simple. Yeah. And, and, yeah, you know, because it's not authentic. You just, it's just asked the wrong way.

Jason Frazell:

I want to give you two things on this for a get back to you that one. One of the things I learned from one of my coach mentors, she's an amazing coach Christine. She has this thing when we're trading in the room and people will say something, and I use it sometimes, or I think it's sometimes I don't tell people say Jim, what was your intention in speaking? And it will usually knock people right on their ass. Because when you actually think about it, like oh, it and she'll, and there's a million ways we speak things, but most of them are self serving. Like I want to persuade somebody I want to be right. I want to get my point across I want to be heard. All those things. There's nothing wrong with those are human needs and the training that is hard for coaches and still hard for me is my intention in speaking is to have you explore something to have you generate something for yourself. So that's number one. Number two, and this is now me to get on my soapbox about one of my biggest pet peeves is when people go, and this is more in a public setting, hey, I have a question. And then they proceeded to tell you all their opinions. This happened last week at the conference, you probably didn't notice it. But this is like a big trigger for me. They proceed to tell you all their opinions on how things should be or all the ways that they sound smart. And at the end of it, the question is, either Is that right, or would you agree? With it's really just a small, it's not really a question. I mean, it is a question, but it's not actually the thing. Now you be looking for this, because people do this all the time. Data, data, data, data, data, data, data, metadata, here's my opinion, my expertise. My opinion, is here's all the things. Jim, would you agree? And that's the fun part. Especially when you're training people, like, Do you have any anybody have any questions that are better? Here's my expertise. Would you agree? That's the question is, would you agree with me on what I just said, because I want to sound smart or sound right. And they might be. But thank you for the question. That's really a thoughtful question that had me. It really you really flipped the script on me there. And with that, I'm yanking it back. I'm done. I'm done. Here. Yeah,

Jim Adams:

I hear you. Yeah. So

Jason Frazell:

Jim, what are you passionate about?

Jim Adams:

The first thing that comes to mind is fun. I had a My dad left when I was really, really young when I was five. But you know, we saw him every year that he was fun dad, like we had a lot of fun. We used to go up in your neck of the woods. He lived in Long Island we used to get all different kind of racecar tracks and and you know buds, sprint cars, stock cars, used to go to the lake up on Lake Ontario, my grandparents had a place and, and so today sounds a little bit selfish, but I just just right off the top of my head. I really like to have fun. I've getting ready to. Let's see two weeks. We're moving the RV down to right near. People are familiar with Hilton Head. Yeah, Hilton. And yeah, they're moving the RV near Hilton Head where 15 minutes from where the RV is being parked. Is an indoor electric go kart track. And I intend at 61 years old to to to start winning. Yeah. Does that track better kart track?

Jason Frazell:

track record? Yeah, that's amazing. I guess one of the reasons that you and I got along immediately. I don't we haven't talked too much about fun. But fun is actually since I've ran started running my own business is actually the governing is actually the governing principle of how I'm doing in my business. Because I know that the more fun I'm having, the more my business takes off, actually share this at a networking meeting. And the thing that I generally have is, if it ain't funny doing it, because I can choose all the things I do. And just to be really clear, for everybody listening. There are things I do that are not fun. I don't like preparing for taxes, I don't like certain other things I have to do. But generally, the level of enjoyment and fun and a half of my life generally goes right alongside with my income, which is a very big shift for me in sales where I thought I had to grind, hustle my ass off, burn myself out in order to make the money. And so it's been a really fun thing. It's been no pun intended a really fun thing for me to explore. And if you're not having fun, what's the point? That's it? I mean, at least for me, like what's the point here? Now?

Jim Adams:

I've done both? Both. I've been Oh, yeah. Drive Mode, which is really just another form of survival. Yeah, it's a form of flight mode. I've been there and it's not fun. And then I've also been where it is literally, like right now today. It's my Monopoly game.

Jason Frazell:

It's so good.

Jim Adams:

It's, you know, how do I you know, each time the analogy I use is that anybody any master of monopoly knows that it's the light orange spaces, it's going to get you the game, right? That's where the biggest ROI is anybody that's like really consistently crushes a monopoly, you'll do whatever you can do to barter, to bargain to get those light orange spaces,

Jason Frazell:

not Boardwalk and Park Place, right? Not Boardwalk and Park Place. It's too expensive to start. Yeah,

Jim Adams:

that's right. And so it's constantly changing in the business, like where you focus, where you focus your learning, and where you focus, your attention is constantly changing. And so that's my, you know, somewhat more complicated. You know, it's a combination of, you know, monopoly and chess I love it in Texas and Texas Hold'em.

Jason Frazell:

There you go. Yeah cuz in business you never know what the river card is or the flop right. You just don't you just don't know. But if you're you played but this is perfect. The whole point the whole point I love Texas Hold'em to start to wrap up this episode because the whole point is know your numbers. Based on what you had the two cards, your hand and the three cards on, on on the table. What are my statistical probability of winning this based on? What I believe I have? That's, I mean, poker is all about, you just got to know your numbers and know the probability. And then there's gonna be some luck of what comes out of the river. What comes out of the flop. I love it. Let's cut we'll have to come back on and talk about games because I like Monopoly. I like chess. And I like Texas Hold'em. I love Texas Hold'em. So Jim, what's the thing that you're most proud of?

Jim Adams:

So I would say, I would say the first is the same name keeps is coming up, right, wrong or different. But Mike's the first time I heard myself on a, like a professionally produced podcast that just like, I'm so excited about, about getting into this arena. This is I don't know this about my sixth guest appearance on a podcast, but I just absolutely, absolutely love it. I know that I know that I've got a message inside of me that people really need to hear. And so the first time I heard that, it was just it just blew my mind. So that's so cool. Yeah. And I also do want to say I am, I'm really, really proud of the team that I have that, that, you know, me and, you know, me and God have put together here, there's, uh, some parents, you know, some single dads and single single mom that, you know, get to be with their kids because they have a virtual job working at home, making, you know, making really good money. We pay people really well we take care of them. And really, very proud of that.

Jason Frazell:

Yeah, I'm gonna, I'm going to add something to this that I think you're gonna like, let's add your wife to that team as well.

Jim Adams:

Yeah, absolutely. She She is on the team. She's my encourager. She does some work in the business. But you know, she's when she feels like it. She's my CEO when she feels like it.

Jason Frazell:

When she feels like that's a nice place to be. You're like today I want to be the boss. But tomorrow, and I really want to that's all good.

Jim Adams:

Yes, the CEO without any responsibility.

Jason Frazell:

Your employees know who's really running stuff over their job. Let's be honest. They know. They know. Yeah. All right. So Jim. Yeah. So Jim, what's something that you're afraid might be true about you?

Jim Adams:

I think I think most of us have to deal with the imposter syndrome. Like there's just the authenticity is so important to me. I have a like a hidden, insidious little fear that somehow I'm going to just not be real and not be genuine.

Jason Frazell:

What do you do to compensate for that?

Jim Adams:

I mean, I do think I kind of I kind of do, if you will overcompensate for it to be that's I'm not sure. I just think I just, I just go out of my way to Well, I'm gonna go. So now I'm going to do a Robert McNamara. I was talking to somebody else about he brought up this issue that, you know, Jim, I think somewhere in your history, someone you care about was taken advantage of. And so I think, no, I'm not concerned so much about me. But that's something really deep down that I care about when I'm working with a customer. Is that uh, you know, I don't want them to be taken advantage of. Yeah.

Jason Frazell:

Yeah. Well, I think that's that that might be a compensation, but I think that also makes it it makes you who you are.

Jim Adams:

Yeah, it's not a bad thing. You know. It just swings me to extreme sometimes. Yeah, like, yeah, sometimes it will make me reactive because I'll get hyper protective. Yeah. Which can get scary.

Jason Frazell:

Well, thanks for sharing that and being vulnerable with us. about that specifically, and just want to say my, we are not customers of yours because we don't live in New York. So we don't have a lot of outdoor pavilions in New York City. I don't know if you know that. But that's not like a thing. Little, it's

Unknown:

a little cramped.

Jason Frazell:

It's a little cramped, not a lot of green space. But my guess is that if I was going to interview some of your customers, they would say it was a pleasure doing business with your company, based on what you just said, feels fair feels right, the prices for the quality and all those things. So congratulations on that again. So Jim, as we wrap up here for today, your world philosophy. So how is it that you see the world here at the ripe age of 61, as you've already outed yourself, so I'm not outing you at this point. You've had your military service, you've had a lot of success in business, you've had some downtimes. What how do you see the world today, here in April of 2022.

Jim Adams:

So I would say this has been a relatively recent realization of mine is you want to call it the world, the universe, God, in my case, is that God has my back. You know, I have had some, you know, definitely had bouts of fear, anxiety, whatever you want to call it. And when I look back on my life, and all the scrapes I've had, and the crazy, you know, make good decisions. I've made crazy decisions and all the scrapes I've had. I've always come out the other side. You know, mysteriously, miraculously, whatever. I've always. I've always come out the other side no matter what. Yeah. And that's amazing. Like, if you knew some of the stuff that I've done, and still do. You know, I think I share with you. I'm going to go here next month with a friend of mine, and go to a three day Racing School going like 150 miles an hour and a circuit. Yeah. Anyway, the world has my back.

Jason Frazell:

Yeah, that's cool. That's a great philosophy. Yeah, it builds a lot of trust. That it's not just on you. And that there's Yeah, so Jim. Yeah,

Jim Adams:

not a good place. That's not it. That's where I was, is Yeah, I was. I went from a Make It Happen guy to help it happen. Guy. That's probably the best summary right there. That's the bomb. I'm helping. Yeah.

Jason Frazell:

I love that. And probably no surprise that your business has taken off in your life and you have more joy and fun than you've ever had, and also get to make a lot of money while doing it. Not surprising. Not surprising. That's nice, Jim. Well, so everybody listening, how can they find you connect with you learn more about what you do and all the different areas maybe come to the RV park down by Hilton Head and have a small dinner? Let's be very clear, just a couple of you to time and make some have some good deep conversation not not boring conversation. Jim, how can people connect with you?

Jim Adams:

So one thing I have right now I've been I've worked really hard on it when I can, because these days American landscape structures takes currently still takes most of my attention. But I put together this piece that I think is really is really super helpful based on all my experience working with, with so many people and my own personal experience, is I've got this piece on my website called four types of business owners. So I'm sure you'll put that in the show notes. Absolutely. That'll be in the show notes. Basically, just real quick, it's the the Gunslinger, the mechanic, the goalie and the unicorn. And like, that's all I really have to say like you can kind of stay who you are just based on that alone. Yeah, and so there's really some gold, some gold buried in there that I've already mentioned in terms of terms of mastery, know what your blind spots are, know what you need to focus on, in hitting the ground running, you know, when we do our, our diagnostics with our clients, really, and really being able to really hit the ground running, you know, in, in most of these businesses, you know, they're not run by a board or a big management team and lots of middle management. It is all about that, that business owner. Yeah.

Jason Frazell:

I have to ask, Which one do you most identify with of your column? What CEO avatar framework, which would identify with?

Jim Adams:

Yeah, I'm a gunslinger, 100% you know, very, very capable at sales. very impulsive. You know, that's like my big blind spot. And, you know, even though I was a numbers guy, I really had to change and be more responsible. All about be more, be more detailed, be more detailed. So gunslingers are not are not. Not. Not detailed. Yeah.

Jason Frazell:

I think I'm a gunslinger.

Jim Adams:

Yeah, probably So,

Jason Frazell:

probably

Jim Adams:

a lot of entrepreneurs are a lot of MCATs. Not too many, not too many goalies. Yeah, cuz it's just, you know, being in business for yourself is just too risky. Yeah, it's funny. You out there, are you out there?

Jason Frazell:

Well, it's funny you say that as we, as we wrap up for today, before we get some words of wisdom for you to, to lead us out. I've taught you know, you know, this I do. I do brand strategy work at a company called brand builders group mazing. It's personal brand strategy. So all my clients, there are people like you or people like me that have their own personal brand. They have podcasts and books and speaking and all that from all walks of life, right, like, all different entrepreneurial things. Some of them are, like accountants and all sorts of things. And it's funny because we asked them when they come in to fill out spreadsheets. And depending on your relationship with spreadsheets, people are like, Ah, I'm just not detail oriented. And I say, yeah, that's why you're here. Because if you knew, because these things and marketing and sales is not rocket science. But the reason that people come to brandbuilders and pay to be in brandbuilders, or pay for a coach is usually because they're entrepreneurs. And by definition entrepreneurs are most of the entrepreneurs. I know, I coach, a lot of them. They're innovators. They're Ideator. They're visionaries, and they're not so concerned with the details because the details if you get, I call it bogged down. Some people love the details. I consider details bogging you can never get your ideas off the ground. You end up like and also, you know this say this to us as entrepreneurs, it's there's no such thing as perfection. There's no There's no right. There's no right way to do it. As much as there's certain resources out there will tell you the exact right way to do it. If there was one right way to do it, I would go read that book. And so would you and all of us, then that author would be a multimillionaire and we'd all know exactly how to do it. But the truth is, there is no one right way to do it. Spoken like a true Gunslinger,

Jim Adams:

right. Yeah, absolutely. Absolutely. Well, Jim, I

Jason Frazell:

want to thank you for being on I learned a lot more about you than I needed before. I really appreciate your friendship, and what you're doing in all areas of all areas of your business and in your life, and your commitment to fun. I love that I didn't know you were as committed. I didn't we never talked specifically about fun. And so last thing for us, take us out with some patented Jim Adams words of wisdom and keep it short and sweet.

Jim Adams:

So I would say that, as far as a business owner, you know, we put too much on ourselves. And we've got to find a way to build a team. And that's much easier said than done is like that detail oriented like this. My project manager Joel like literally saved my life. Yeah. That, you know, he is just super, super detail oriented. And then now I've contracted with an outsourced CFO company to do not the financial management part, but to do the actual accounting. Because accounting sucks, and I have to save my opinions first about CPAs for another episode, but

Jason Frazell:

that's great, Jim. Well, thank you so much. Have a great trip down near Hilton Head and keep doing what you're doing. It's a pleasure to have you on we'll have you back on again soon.

Jim Adams:

Yes, sir. Thanks a lot, Jason. Have a great one. Thanks, Jim.

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